Nashville Concert Calendar

Aug
28
Fri
Frist Fridays : Those Darlins @ Frist Center
Aug 28 @ 6:00 PM – 9:00 PM

The Frist Center’s popular summer concert series Frist Fridays kicks off Friday, June 26, and will feature musical acts that celebrate personal style in conjunction with the summer exhibition Italian Style: Fashion since 1945. Now in its thirteenth season, Frist Fridays take place on the final Friday of June, July and August from 6:00 to 9:00 p.m. in the Center’s Turner Courtyard. Patrons are invited to enjoy an evening of live music, light snacks and beverages as well as the diverse exhibitions on view in the Frist Center’s galleries. Frist Fridays take place rain or shine.

2015 FRIST FRIDAYS LINE UP*:
August 28   Those Darlins 
Those Darlins are edgy and seductive, both in sound and personal style. The fashion- and attitude-forward Nashville trio has released three albums since their formation in 2006, the most recent of which, Blur The Line (2013), received widespread praise and the “Best Live Act of 2014” award from Paste magazine. Members Jessi Zazu, Nikki Kvarnes, and Linwood Regensburg blend rock and roll, alt-country, and garage rock to create a sound that is sensual and often spiked. Those Darlins have toured with rock acts, including Dan Auerbach of the Black Keys, Drive-by Truckers, JEFF the Brotherhood, and have been featured by NPR, SPIN Magazine, and Pitchfork.

 

ADMISSION
Admission to each Frist Fridays concert is free for Frist Center members and to visitors 18 years and younger. General adult admission is $12.00 for not-yet-members, $9.00 for seniors and college students with ID and $7.00 for military.

Frist Fridays feature a special selection of economically priced snack food items in the Frist Center Café.  The selections will vary for each event and will include such items as chicken wings, sliders, corn dogs and soft pretzels and will range in price from $2.50 to $4.50.

Keb ‘Mo @ Ryman Auditorium
Aug 28 @ 7:00 PM – 11:00 PM

Keb’ Mo’

Friday, August 28, 2015, 8:00 p.m.

SCHERMERHORN SYMPHONY CENTER

BUY TICKETS

PERFORMER
Keb’ Mo’
Presented without orchestra

Three-time GRAMMY®-winning contemporary bluesman Keb’ Mo’ makes his very first appearance at the Schermerhorn. Over the past two decades, Keb has emerged as a visionary interpreter of American roots music, with unforgettable original tunes like “Am I Wrong,” “Every Morning” and “Life Is Beautiful,” along with new classics on his latest Billboard chart-topping album, BLUESAmericana. This master musician will light up the room with his joyful presence and poignant, down-to-earth songs.

Old Crow Medicine Show @ Ascend Amphitheater
Aug 28 @ 7:30 PM – 11:00 PM

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Get tickets on May 09 at 10:00 AM CDT.

Aug
29
Sat
Social Distortion with Nikki Lane @ Ryman Auditorium
Aug 29 @ 7:00 PM – 11:00 PM

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Social Distortion

with Nikki Lane and Drag the River
Saturday, August 29, 2015
8:00 PM
$37.50 & $32.50
On sale Friday, April 24 at Noon
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If purchasing tickets in person at the Ryman Box Office or any Ticketmaster outlet, your spot in line will be determined by a lottery. For details, click here
Under the Sun Tour: Sugar Ray, Uncle Kracker, Better Than Ezra, Eve 6 @ Ascend Amphitheater
Aug 29 @ 7:30 PM – 11:00 PM

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Get tickets on May 08 at 10:00 AM CDT.

Aug
30
Sun
Nashville Sunday Night Presents: Rayland Baxter @ 3rd and Lindsley
Aug 30 @ 8:00 PM – 10:00 PM

Artist

Itʼs hard to pinpoint the moment that songs are born, the day casual hummers become singers or scribblers become songwriters. Rayland Baxter certainly canʼt, and he wouldnʼt want to. Though he grew up in Nashville to the sounds of his fatherʼs pedal steel, he didnʼt dream of being a rock star. He loved music, of course, but he liked other things, too: being outside, playing sports, working at the bait shop to make spare change. Heʼd always just let things settle into place naturally, following his gut from Tennessee to Colorado to Israel and back again, not knowing that when he returned home heʼd have a handful of songs and the knowledge that, at the end of the day, he didnʼt want to do anything else but make music. He leads a life without reigns, his work always echoing the ease in which it came to be.

Growing up, Baxterʼs father Bucky (a multi-instrumentalist for Bob Dylan, Steve Earle and Ryan Adams, among others) made sure music was just a natural part of life, a soundtrack to childhood. “I grew up around pedal steel melodies,” Baxter says, “not knowing how later in life it would shape me and how I sing or place lyrics in a song.” Heʼd met Dylan and become friends with a young Justin Townes Earle—back then, they were just two kids who knew their dads were gone frequently. One day, while out on a motorcycle trip, Bucky bought his son a guitar: a used, blue electric one. He was in elementary school, no older than third grade. “I played it,” Baxter says. “But I also played Nintendo.”

After a relationship in Paris went sour (though would later inspire the song “oLivia) he took his fatherʼs old friend up on an offer to spend some time at his home in Ashkelon, Israel. “I was supposed to be there for two weeks,” he says. “I ended up staying for six months.”

He began recording his full-length in January 2011, produced by Skylar Wilson (Justin Townes Earle, Caitlin Rose) and supported by his friends, including Eric Masse (producer/engineer), Jacquire King (mix) and instrumentals by his father, Bucky. The songs range from the solemn, steel guitar and harmonica anchored “marjoria”; to the locomotive, du-wop of “driveway meLody”; to the stark, Middle Eastern tinge of “wiLLow.” Each is thickly emotional, raw but supremely balanced, pulling reference not only from musical idols but from love had and lost, roads traveled and trials awaiting back at home. And, when you strip it all away, these are songs that could exist with just Baxterʼs voice and guitar alone, timeless.

His songs are a calming force for anyone looking for change, for love, or wanting to walk in a different direction—because it was his own quest for all those things that motivated the music. “I had nothing to write about until I was 25. I had to live through a lot,” he says, “and I when I sing I donʼt hold back. Iʼll cry on stage if I came to it. Itʼs an emotional release for me, and thereʼs no makeup on it. It puts me at ease, and thatʼs what I hope it will do for those who listen.” Down the mountains and the valleys, like the breeze.

Sep
1
Tue
ZZ Top with Blackberry Smoke @ Ascend Amphiteahter
Sep 1 @ 7:30 PM – 11:00 PM

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Get tickets on May 08 at 10:00 AM CDT.

Sep
3
Thu
Lightning 100’s Live On The Green Music Festival: HEADLINER TBA, THE DELTA SAINTS, GREG HOLDEN @ Public Square Park
Sep 3 @ 5:00 PM – 11:00 PM
Dwight Yoakam @ Ryman Auditorium
Sep 3 @ 7:00 PM – 11:00 PM

Dwight Yoakam

Thursday, September 3, 2015
7:30 PM
$62.25, $52.25 & $42.25
On Sale Saturday, April 25 at 10 AM
Share page with AddThis

Tickets for this show will be available ONLINE ONLY.

Each ticket order also includes a physical CD of Dwight’s latest album Second Hand Heart out on April 14th.


Few entertainers have attained the iconic status of Dwight Yoakam.  Perhaps that is because so few have consistently and repeatedly met the high standard of excellence delivered by the Kentucky native no matter what his endeavor. His name immediately conjures up compelling, provocative images: A pale cowboy hat with the brim pulled low; poured-on blue jeans; intricate, catchy melodies paired with poignant, brilliant lyrics that mesmerize with their indelible imprint.  Then there’s Yoakam the actor, who seemingly melts into his roles, impressively standing toe-to-toe with some of the world’s top thespians: Jodie Foster, Tommy Lee Jones, Forest Whitaker, Nicholas Cage. Add to that Yoakam the entrepreneur and you have a singular talent without peer.

Much has been made that the Kentucky-born, Ohio-raised Yoakam was too country for Nashville when he first sought out his musical fortune in the mid-80s, but the truth is his music has always been too unique, too ruggedly individualistic to fit neatly into any one box. Like the icons he so admires –Elvis, Merle, Buck– Yoakam is one of a kind. He has taken his influences and filtered them into his own potent blend of country and rock that honors his musical predecessors and yet creates something beautifully new. As Vanity Fair declared, “Yoakam strides the divide between rock’s lust and country’s lament.”

He has 12 gold albums and nine platinum or multi-platinum albums, including the triple-platinum “This Time”.  Five of those albums have topped Billboard’s Country Albums chart with another 14 landing in the Top 10.  More than 30 singles have charted, with 22 going Top 20, including the incomparable hits “Honky Tonk Man,”  “Please Please Baby,” “Little Ways,” “I Sang Dixie,” “It Only Hurts When I Cry,” “Fast as You” and “Thousand Miles from Nowhere.” He’s won two Grammys and earned a staggering 21 nominations.

Live On The Green After Party @ ACME Feed and Seed
Sep 3 @ 11:00 PM

good-life4-big

Event Details: 21+ / Free / 11:00pm – 2:00am

Genre: Dance / After-Party

Come party on the 1st floor with us and DJ Rate after LOTG

Sep
4
Fri
Dwight Yoakam @ Ryman Auditorium
Sep 4 @ 7:00 PM – 11:00 PM

Dwight Yoakam

Thursday, September 3, 2015
7:30 PM
$62.25, $52.25 & $42.25
On Sale Saturday, April 25 at 10 AM
Share page with AddThis

Tickets for this show will be available ONLINE ONLY.

Each ticket order also includes a physical CD of Dwight’s latest album Second Hand Heart out on April 14th.


Few entertainers have attained the iconic status of Dwight Yoakam.  Perhaps that is because so few have consistently and repeatedly met the high standard of excellence delivered by the Kentucky native no matter what his endeavor. His name immediately conjures up compelling, provocative images: A pale cowboy hat with the brim pulled low; poured-on blue jeans; intricate, catchy melodies paired with poignant, brilliant lyrics that mesmerize with their indelible imprint.  Then there’s Yoakam the actor, who seemingly melts into his roles, impressively standing toe-to-toe with some of the world’s top thespians: Jodie Foster, Tommy Lee Jones, Forest Whitaker, Nicholas Cage. Add to that Yoakam the entrepreneur and you have a singular talent without peer.

Much has been made that the Kentucky-born, Ohio-raised Yoakam was too country for Nashville when he first sought out his musical fortune in the mid-80s, but the truth is his music has always been too unique, too ruggedly individualistic to fit neatly into any one box. Like the icons he so admires –Elvis, Merle, Buck– Yoakam is one of a kind. He has taken his influences and filtered them into his own potent blend of country and rock that honors his musical predecessors and yet creates something beautifully new. As Vanity Fair declared, “Yoakam strides the divide between rock’s lust and country’s lament.”

He has 12 gold albums and nine platinum or multi-platinum albums, including the triple-platinum “This Time”.  Five of those albums have topped Billboard’s Country Albums chart with another 14 landing in the Top 10.  More than 30 singles have charted, with 22 going Top 20, including the incomparable hits “Honky Tonk Man,”  “Please Please Baby,” “Little Ways,” “I Sang Dixie,” “It Only Hurts When I Cry,” “Fast as You” and “Thousand Miles from Nowhere.” He’s won two Grammys and earned a staggering 21 nominations.

Jonny Lang @ Schermerhorn Symphony Center
Sep 4 @ 7:00 PM – 10:00 PM

JonnyLang-600x100

Phenomenal blues-rock guitarist Jonny Lang returns to perform scorching tunes from hit albums like Lie to Me, Wander This World and Long Time Coming, along with his powerful new release, Fight for My Soul. This amazing musician and charismatic presence has shared the stage with The Rolling Stones, B.B. King, Aerosmith, Sting, Buddy Guy and more. Hear him as he rocks the Schermerhorn for one night only.

Lightning 100 Presents ZZ Ward LOVE & WAR TOUR @ Marathon Music Works
Sep 4 @ 8:00 PM – 11:45 PM

ZZ Ward LOVE & WAR TOUR

FRI, SEPTEMBER 4, 2015

DOORS: 7:00 PM / SHOW: 8:00 PM

MARATHON MUSIC WORKS

NASHVILLE, TN

$22.00 – $27.00

ON SALE FRI 5/29 10:00 AM CDT

THIS EVENT IS 18 AND OVER

ABSOLUTELY NO REFUNDS – NO EXCEPTIONS. LINEUPS AND TIMES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE.
GOV’T ISSUED ID REQUIRED. NO RE-ENTRY.

ZZ Ward

ZZ Ward

I was born in Pennsylvania and raised in Oregon, in a small town called Roseburg. I grew up listening to my Dad write and sing the blues and started performing with him in his blues bands when I was a kid. I fell in love with the sincerity of Etta, the soul of Muddy and the power of Big Mama. When I got older I started writing hooks for and performing with local rappers from Eugene. I fell in love with hip-hop, with it’s authenticity. Now I’m married to em both. DIRTY SHINE!
Sep
5
Sat
Musicians Corner: Marc Broussard The McCrary Sisters​ ​ Matthew Perryman Jones Castro
Sep 5 all-day

Our Fall 2015 Season takes place September 5 to October 31.

Musicians Corner, a program of The Conservancy for the Parthenon and Centennial Park, presents free weekly lawn parties in Nashville’s Centennial Park on Saturday afternoons in May, June, September and October.

Follow us on Twitter: @muscornernash
Follow us on Instagram: /MusCornerNash
Learn more and get performance schedules at www.musicianscornernashville.com

Musicians Corner is a program of The Conservancy for the Parthenon and Centennial Park, a 5019c)(3) nonprofit organization.

Widespread Panic @ Ascend Amphitheater
Sep 5 @ 7:30 PM – 11:00 PM

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Get tickets on June 05 at 10:00 AM CDT.

Bloodkin @ Exit/In
Sep 5 @ 9:00 PM

Bloodkin
LINKS
Bloodkin
Daniel Hutchens and Eric Carter met each other when they were eight years old. They solidified their early friendship based on a mutual love of baseball, comic books, and rock n roll music. They grew up in West Virginia; much time during their high school years was spent on Skull Run Road, where Eric’s family lived, a few miles outside Ravenswood. The boys recall that road as being the site of their first garage band practices. After high school, they started getting a little more serious about their blossoming songwriting partnership. Their road wound through Huntington, WV, and eventually on to Athens, GA, which they soon came to call home. They continued to concentrate on their songwriting, and by the early 90’s they had a catalogue of over 300 compositions. By this time Hutchens and Carter had given their musical collaboration a “band name”: Bloodkin.

Sep
6
Sun
Widespread Panic @ Ascend Amphitheater
Sep 6 @ 7:30 PM – 11:00 PM

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Get tickets on June 05 at 10:00 AM CDT.

Nashville Sunday Night Presents: The Dead Deads with Hillbilly Casino @ 3rd and Lindsley
Sep 6 @ 8:00 PM – 10:00 PM

Artist

A supergroup formed from members of The Wolf Sisters, PRIM! and Catfight in the summer of 2013, this powerhouse of live performance is based in Nashville, Tennessee. The musical influences of the group vary from girl to girl, but the common thread is drum-based rock bands like The Melvins, The Foo Fighters and Torche. Audiences may be curious as they see five girls with X’s over their eyes set up amps and tune guitars, but once the wall of sound washes over them, they forget who they were there to see and are spirited away into the dark and magical world of The Dead Deads.

The Dead Deads live show is high-energy, dark and fun. Pink smoke (when allowed by venue) floats from the stage as metal riffs are blended with doo-wop harmonies and classic pop sensibilities to create a new brand of rock–brutal, silly and sublime. The Dead Deads are for fans of everything from 90’s girl bands like The Breeders to modern metal bands like Mastadon, to alternative rock bands like The Foo Fighters or even Weezer.  The Dead Deads bring the rock, in its many forms, and live music fans are jumping on the bandwagon in droves.

In December 2014 they wrapped their first national tour with Halestorm, dramatically growing their fanbase through their wild live show and insidious charm at meet and greets. Their debut full-length record “Rainbeau” produced by Brian Carter at Paradox and mixed by Matt Mahaffey/sElf was recorded live to tape in three days and released in November to rave reviews calling the album, “the weirdest wonderland of accessible punk and rock you’ve heard in awhile,” and “one of the better albums of the year.”

Spring 2015 finds the girls hard at work on a new record, with a scheduled teaser EP release in summer 2015, and the full album slated for the end of 2015.  Look for The Dead Deads on the road this summer or on the high seas where they will be ripping alongside their heroes on Motorhead’s Motorboat, and the ShipRocked Cruise in January 2016.

WSP Night Two Afterparty feat. Sam Holt @ Exit/In
Sep 6 @ 9:00 PM

WSP Night Two Afterparty feat.

Sam Holt

SUN, SEPTEMBER 6, 2015

DOORS: 9:00 PM / SHOW: 10:00 PM

EXIT/IN

NASHVILLE, TN

$10.00

THIS EVENT IS 18 AND OVER

Absolutely no refunds – no exceptions. Lineups and times are subject to change.
Gov’t issued ID required. No re-entry.

Sam Holt

Sam Holt

After the 2002 passing of forty-year-old Widespread Panic guitarist Michael Houser, Sam Holt, Houser’s guitar tech, experienced this moment of clarity as he realized the critical need to make the most of his time. “There were many times he [Houser] told me, ‘I want you to go do your own thing. You need to quit teching and go play music,’ says Holt.

“And [after he died] that really hit home for me.” It was Houser’s death that served as the catalyst for Sam Holt to dedicate himself to Outformation.

Although it’s clear his more-than-seven-year tenure with Widespread Panic has been instrumental in Holt forming and pursing Outformation, the story really begins with Holt’s old friend, bass player and singer Grady Upchurch. “Grady and I go way back and we share a lot of history,” explains Holt, “and to be able to make music with someone and connect like that and then also have that shared background is pretty special.”

Regardless of whether Holt developed his confident, “hypnotic” style by touring with Outformation, learning at the foot of Michael Houser, sitting in numerous times with Widespread Panic, or by simply tapping into the music in his head, it’s a driving factor to the Outformation sound. Having already played for packed stadiums with tens of thousands of screaming fans, Holt is ready to lead Outformation to the masses.

Sep
8
Tue
Purity Ring: Another Eternity Tour @ Marathon Music Works
Sep 8 @ 8:00 PM – 11:45 PM

Purity Ring
Links
Purity Ring
After sixty-five fortnights, Purity Ring have returned with their super-tight second album Another Eternity. The pair ventured home to the frozen industrial landscapes of their birthplace Edmonton, Alberta to document much of what was to become the album. For the first time, vocalist Megan James and producer Corin Roddick were able to create a record in the same room.

Purity Ring’s first album Shrines was recorded separately in Montreal and Halifax, where Corin and Megan were respectively living at the time. Despite being a thousand kilometers apart and barely talking, Shrines was a cohesive, beguiling and wholly unique universe of what the band called ‘Future Pop’. At the center of the amniotic swirl of Shrines was an undeniable nucleus of crystalline pop which presciently suggested both indie and popular music to come. Critics were psyched: ‘Best New Music’ from Pitchfork and praise from The New York Times, Rolling Stone, and NPR, among others. They quickly amassed a rabid fanbase, toured relentlessly and sold out shows worldwide.

On Another Eternity, Purity Ring trade the gorgeously claustrophobic atmospheres of Shrines for wide-open, muscular vistas of sound and luminous, up-front vocals. Crafting a lyrical universe of “sweat and dreams” populated by seacastles, rattling spines, and weeping drawers, Megan James wields concrete imagery and metaphor with increasingly direct, startling resonance. Corin Roddick’s gifts for evocative melody remain intact, but his drum work and use of space have been completely reforged: immaculately built and focused in service of the song.

“begin again” rouses Purity Ring’s brooding balladry into a sky-reaching anthem while retaining its distinctive shape. “bodyache” is the kind of devastatingly infectious single that their previous work only gestured at. “stillness in woe” features a frozen, manipulated piano, dovetailing with Megan’s time suspending narrative. “repetition” finds surreal, love-lorn lyricism soaring over delicately woven synths. The emotional geography of Another Eternity is wider than ever: gloomy valleys and gleaming peaks in even measure.

Though they are now working at a higher resolution, Purity Ring remain hands-on with every aspect of their project. As usual, the band produced and recorded Another Eternity entirely themselves. The pair worked to develop an innovative new live performance, and Megan designed the band’s onstage and video fashion.

Another Eternity revels in its upfront melody, clarity, and confidence. With every step forward they take, Purity Ring actualize their vision while sounding utterly and undeniably like themselves.

Sep
10
Thu
Lightning 100’s Live On The Green Music Festival: RODRIGO Y GABRIELA, JD MCPHERSON, HUMMING HOUSE, DELTA RAE, KOPECKY, CIVIL TWILIGHT @ Public Square Park
Sep 10 @ 5:00 PM – 11:00 PM
Live On The Green After Party @ ACME Feed and Seed
Sep 10 @ 11:00 PM

good-life4-big

Event Details: 21+ / Free / 11:00pm – 2:00am

Genre: Dance / After-Party

Come party on the 1st floor with us and DJ Rate after LOTG

Sep
11
Fri
Lightning 100’s Live On The Green Music Festival: PASSION PIT, BIG DATA, ZELLA DAY, MUSIC CITY MAYHEM WINNER TBA, TURBO FRUITS, ARTIST TBA, ARTIST TBA @ Public Square Park
Sep 11 @ 5:00 PM – 11:00 PM
Earphunk with Main Squeeze @ Exit/In
Sep 11 @ 8:00 PM

Earphunk

Main Squeeze

FRI, SEPTEMBER 11, 2015

DOORS: 8:00 PM / SHOW: 9:00 PM

EXIT/IN

NASHVILLE, TN

$12.00 – $14.00

THIS EVENT IS 18 AND OVER

Absolutely no refunds – no exceptions. Lineups and times are subject to change.
Gov’t issued ID required. No re-entry.

Earphunk

Earphunk

200 shows, three trips across the United States and appearances at Electric Forest Festival, Bear Creek Music and Art Festival, and Wakarusa Music Festival. It’s been a busy 24 months for Earphunk who have seen their efforts propel them from small club stages to packed clubs and theaters across the country. The New Orleans born-and-bred quintet shows no sign of letting off the gas, and now, with the band’s third studio album release of Sweet Nasty, the band has captured the energy that has won over a rapidly growing fanbase of loyal listeners.

Recorded at the storied Studio in the Country in rural Louisiana while on break between tour stints, Sweet Nasty is Earphunk’s boldest release to date. “When you hear the album it sounds like a live show, and that’s how it should feel,” explains lead guitarist Paul Provosty, who also handled mixing duties for the record. “We wanted it to sound big – a true representation of our live show.” The Studio’s hallowed halls provided the proper backdrop for the band’s uniquely organic balance of heavy-pocket funk and reckless prog-driven guitar explosions, or “prog-funk”, as the band refers to it.

The band’s early rehearsals saw Provosty, Mark Hempe (vocals/guitar), Michael Matthews (drums), Michael Comeaux (Bass), and Christian Galle (keyboards/organ) as college students around New Orleans and Baton Rouge, LA in 2009 — there were no expectations of national tours and sold out dates. But as things quickly progressed, the option to pursue a full-time career as musicians drove the band to hit the road. “After the first few tours, we were fully vested in this together,” Hempe muses, “and when people are coming to the shows, and appreciating what we’re doing, it gives us the drive to want to step up our game, to be as tight as we can be.”
Years later, the unit’s tireless touring ethic continues to fortify their commitment. “It’s tough leaving New Orleans; this is our home. We don’t get much time back here now, but luckily as we’ve toured, fans have spread,” explains Provosty. “To do this right, you have to keep visiting every market every three or four months, and we’re committed to that. When the shows are selling out, we know our music is resonating. It’s just a matter of continuing to give this thing the room it needs to grow.”

Part of finding the room to grow is recognizing when to reach out to a few helping hands. Saxophonist and close friend Khris Royal (Rebelution, Dark Matter) had contributed his services to past Earphunk records, but for Sweet Nasty, the band was looking to create a larger section. “Everyone in New Orleans, they play with each other. Everyone sits in with one another. It’s a natural thing and that’s the vibe we wanted on the record,” says Provosty.

There are worse places to be than New Orleans when in need of a horn player, and the band had to look no further than Eric “Benny” Bloom (Lettuce, Pretty Lights). “We had been out on the road with Lettuce for a few dates in the Southeast and got to know the guys pretty well,” recalls Galle. “When Eric moved to New Orleans, it was a no brainer. We needed him on the record with Khris.” Bloom and Royal unite with the five-piece in stellar fashion, bringing a proper funk authenticity to high-energy tracks like the Zapp and Roger inspired “Phine” and foot stomping title track “Sweet Nasty.” As George Clinton once mused about the band – “Y’all ain’t your average white band!”

Although the album was recorded, the work was not yet complete. In an age where digital releases and distribution models leave artists with more questions than answers, the band sought for an alternative. The solution was found in a partnership with the emerging publisher platform BitTorrent Bundle. BitTorrent Inc, the company behind the revolutionary peer-to-peer protocol with over 170 million monthly users, describes Bundle as “a revolutionary file format that’s designed to restore digital media to its experiential core.” That’s precisely the type of treatment Earphunk was looking for with the release of Sweet Nasty, which will debut exclusively on BitTorrent Bundle on August 18th. The Sweet Nasty Bundle will be loaded up with exclusive videos, live sets, and artwork to accompany the new album to enrich the fans’ experience.

Sweet Nasty showcases an emerging band with something to prove; yet who are prepared, willing, and ready to define themselves as a premiere national act. And with it’s release locked and loaded, the next step is a familiar one for Earphunk. As the band loads the trailer for their next national trek to support the album’s release, dates and festivals are already being booked for 2015. There are no plans to deviate from this strategy; after all, it’s worked out thus far. “Our fans have done so much for us already on this journey,” explains Hempe. “We just feel beyond fortunate to have this audience and we’re just going to continue working how we’ve been working, so they can feel proud to support us.”

Live On The Green After Party @ ACME Feed and Seed
Sep 11 @ 11:00 PM

good-life4-big

Event Details: 21+ / Free / 11:00pm – 2:00am

Genre: Dance / After-Party

Come party on the 1st floor with us and DJ Rate after LOTG

Sep
12
Sat
Musicians Corner : Dr. Ralph Stanley and The Clinch Mountain Boys, Jonathan Tyler, Darnell Levine, Aubrie Sellers @ Centennial Park
Sep 12 all-day

Our Fall 2015 Season takes place September 5 to October 31.

Musicians Corner, a program of The Conservancy for the Parthenon and Centennial Park, presents free weekly lawn parties in Nashville’s Centennial Park on Saturday afternoons in May, June, September and October.

Follow us on Twitter: @muscornernash
Follow us on Instagram: /MusCornerNash
Learn more and get performance schedules at www.musicianscornernashville.com

Musicians Corner is a program of The Conservancy for the Parthenon and Centennial Park, a 5019c)(3) nonprofit organization.

Tennessee Volkfest @ Nashville Farmers Market
Sep 12 – Sep 13 all-day
web-poster
Tennessee Volksfest @ Nashville Farmers Market for 2 Weekends.
September 12th & 13th & 19th & 20th. Gates @ 11am
FREE
Kid & Dog Friendly
The Tennessee Volksfest is back, and excited to return for not one but TWO big weekends at the Nashville Farmers Market. Come out and enjoy Nashville’s only true Munich style Oktoberfest. Enjoy half liters of German beers, bratwurst, hot pretzels, and a variety of great German foods. Plus, there will be live music, games, and fun for all ages.
http://www.tennesseevolksfest.com/
Lightning 100’s Live On The Green Music Festival: BEN FOLDS, HEADLINER TBA, ARTIST TBA, ELLE KING, ALL THEM WITCHES, LENNON & MAISY, THE DISTRICTS, ANDERSON EAST, KALEO, FUTURE THIEVES, ARTIST TBA, MR. STEVE, @ Public Square Park
Sep 12 @ 5:00 PM – 11:00 PM
Live On The Green After Party @ ACME Feed and Seed
Sep 12 @ 11:00 PM

good-life4-big

Event Details: 21+ / Free / 11:00pm – 2:00am

Genre: Dance / After-Party

Come party on the 1st floor with us and DJ Rate after LOTG

Sep
15
Tue
Lightning 100 Presents: Best Coast @ Exit/In
Sep 15 @ 8:00 PM – 11:30 PM
Best Coast

Best Coast

Best Coast – singer/songwriter/guitarist Bethany Cosentino and guitarist Bobb Bruno – will release their third full-length album, entitled California Nights, out now on Harvest Records.

California Nights is a brighter, more sparkly, more sophisticated, more psychedelic Best Coast album across the board, embodying the rich lightness and stinging darkness of a California state of mind. The love stories Bethany spins on California Nights all detail the highs and the lows of relationships, similar to the juxtaposition of a the band’s native Los Angeles – a place tinted by candy-colored palm trees and pale blue skies while existing within the loneliness and desperation of waterless place. More than that, there is a literal meaning to the record’s title – Cosentino is a well-documented insomniac whose creativity spirals out in the early hours of the morning, allowing her to write, undisturbed, the finest album Best Coast has made to date.

Says Bethany about California Nights:

“If you have ever lived in California, you know what nighttime here feels like. You know what the sky looks like when those epic sunsets begin, and you understand that feeling and the way things change when the sun finally sets. In LA, or maybe just personally to me, when the sun sets – I feel like there is a large sense of calmness in the air, and I feel like everything that happened to me prior in the day, whether crappy experiences or good ones, at night, it all goes away and I sink deep into this different kind of ‘world.’

It also ties in with the idea that, in LA, there’s a real darkness that you don’t see unless you know where to look. That’s a theme we very consciously decided to explore and play with when making this record. We related to the idea that things may LOOK or SOUND fun and upbeat, but they may not actually always BE that way – much like our songs. A lot of the writing for this record consisted of me getting to know myself again and remembering where Bethany ended and Best Coast began. I took a much needed step back and I was able to breathe deep for a moment and really focus on what I was doing. The end result of all of that, is California Nights. It’s about a journey, accepting the things you have no control over; it’s about dealing with life like an adult, and at the end of the day, reminding yourself that there really is no reason to be sad, and you have every right to feel okay.”

Sep
19
Sat
Musicians Corner : Les Paul Tribute with Artists To Be Announced Angaleena Presley Joseph LeMay Daniel Martin Moore @ Centennial Park
Sep 19 all-day

Our Fall 2015 Season takes place September 5 to October 31.

Musicians Corner, a program of The Conservancy for the Parthenon and Centennial Park, presents free weekly lawn parties in Nashville’s Centennial Park on Saturday afternoons in May, June, September and October.

Follow us on Twitter: @muscornernash
Follow us on Instagram: /MusCornerNash
Learn more and get performance schedules at www.musicianscornernashville.com

Musicians Corner is a program of The Conservancy for the Parthenon and Centennial Park, a 5019c)(3) nonprofit organization.

Tennessee Volkfest @ Nashville Farmers Market
Sep 19 – Sep 20 all-day
web-poster
Tennessee Volksfest @ Nashville Farmers Market for 2 Weekends.
September 12th & 13th & 19th & 20th. Gates @ 11am
FREE
Kid & Dog Friendly
The Tennessee Volksfest is back, and excited to return for not one but TWO big weekends at the Nashville Farmers Market. Come out and enjoy Nashville’s only true Munich style Oktoberfest. Enjoy half liters of German beers, bratwurst, hot pretzels, and a variety of great German foods. Plus, there will be live music, games, and fun for all ages.
http://www.tennesseevolksfest.com/
Sep
20
Sun
Nashville Sunday Night Presents: Jay Farrar performing songs from Son Volt’s “Trace” plus special guest: Parker Millsap @ 3rd and Lindsley
Sep 20 @ 8:00 PM – 10:00 PM

Artist

As a founder of alternative country pioneers Uncle Tupelo, as a solo artist, and as the leader of Son Volt, Jay Farrar’s work often seeks out the ghosts of America’s discordant or forgotten past, converses at length with them, and writes songs that stake a claim to a better future. Most recently, Farrar has added One Fast Move Or I’m Gone: Music From Kerouac’s Big Sur (F-Stop/Atlantic), a collaboration project with Benjamin Gibbard of Death Cab For Cutie, to his long list of critically acclaimed albums.

For many years, Farrar’s songwriting has been inspired and influenced by Kerouac’s compositional style. He called upon this inspiration when writing the songs for One Fast Move Or I’m Gone by pulling passages directly from the Kerouac’s Big Sur and putting them to music with Gibbard. These songs were then used in the documentary about Kerouac of the same name.

Son Volt’s most recent release, American Central Dust (Rounder), marks the apotheosis of both the Son Volt dynamic and the rigorous aesthetic that distinguishes Farrar’s entire body of work, in which classic and contemporary elements are fashioned into arresting new shapes. In the classic sense, the new album exhilaratingly carries on the tradition of the Byrds, the Flying Burrito Brothers, Little Feat circa Sailin’ Shoes, the Rolling Stones of Exile on Main Street and early R.E.M.

“The approach was to get back to more fundamental themes, both lyrically and musically, to make a more focused record,” Farrar explains. “The Search was more about expanding the scope in terms of song structures and instrumentation. This time around, I was going for a kind of simplicity, even in the structure of the songs. I probably learned that from listening to Tom Waits, where simplicity can be a virtue.”

These songs are the modern-day aural equivalent of the photographs of Walker Evans, Robert Frank and William Eggleston: sharply observed yet compassionate images of the telling details of everyday life during hard times. Several of them play out as psychological travelogues, as Farrar captures moods in motion. “I suppose I gather ideas for my songs while on the road,” he says, “but there’s also always the consciousness there that the songs are gonna be played on the road, so it’s intertwined.”

Sep
22
Tue
Indigo Girls @ Ryman Auditorium
Sep 22 @ 7:30 PM – 11:00 PM
Sep
23
Wed
Kacey Musgraves – SOLD OUT @ Ryman Auditorium
Sep 23 @ 7:00 PM – 11:00 PM
LIVE AT THE RYMAN

Kacey Musgraves

2nd Show Added by Popular Demand!
Thursday, September 24, 2015
7:30 PM
$45, $35 & $25
Share page with AddThis

Two decades ago — long before Same Trailer Different Park turned her into a Grammy-winning country star with sold-out tours and Top 10 hits — Kacey Musgraves participated in her first (and only) beauty pageant.

“My hometown is pretty famous for its sweet potatoes,” she says, “and every year, they hold the Golden Sweet Potato Festival. They crown a Sweet Potato Queen and a Little Miss Tater Tot for little girls. I only competed for Little Miss Tater Tot once, when I was about three, and lost miserably to a girl in a sparklier dress.”

The pageant world, with its fake smiles and sky-high hairdos, wasn’t the best match for Musgraves. She was more interested in songwriting, finishing her very first tune at 9 years old and learning her first instrument, the mandolin, as a pre-teen. Years later, though, the peculiarities of daily life in a small town — along with the places she’s visited (and people she’s met) since moving away— are back on her mind.

It’s been years since Musgraves lived in Golden, Texas, her childhood home of roughly 600 people, but the whirlwind that followed Same Trailer Different Park — a debut album that topped the country charts, took home two Grammy Awards (including Country Album of the Year) and sent Musgraves halfway across the world on tour — made her think hard about where she came from. Pageant Material, her second album, pays tribute to those Bible Belt roots, shining a light on a hometown girl who’s grown up, expanded her worldview and done a lot of livin’ since skipping town. It’s an album about where she’s from and where she’s going, full of autobiographical details that are humorous one minute and heartwarming the next.

“I really wanted this album to have a classic feel, like a lot of the records I know and love,” says Musgraves, who name-checks artists like Willie Nelson, Glen Campbell and Ronnie Milsap as influences on Pageant Material’s easygoing stride. “I intended on it having a laid-back yet lush, slightly kitschy, western vibe. And most of all, I wanted it to feel like me.”

Appropriately, all thirteen of the album’s songs were co-written by Musgraves, who teamed up with the same group of songwriters who’d helped bring Same Trailer Different Park to life several years earlier. Those names may be familiar — Brandy Clark, Luke Laird, Shane McAnally and Josh Osborne, along with additions like Natalie Hemby and Ashley Arrison — but the songs are new, dreamt up during a songwriter’s retreat in West Texas as well a handful of sessions back home in Nashville.

During the gorgeous “Late to the Party,” Musgraves lingers with her boyfriend before a big get-together, knowing that he, not the party, is the real destination. She kicks back and enjoys life at a slower speed with “High Time,” whose twangy chorus — punctuated by a whistled riff worthy of a high-lonesome cowboy — doubles as a nod to the childhood years Musgraves spent performing western swing music. On “Dimestore Cowgirl,” she breezes through some of the more surreal highlights of her days on the road, from an early-morning European boat ride that took her band past the White Cliffs of Dover to a night spent in the same middle-of-nowhere motel where Gram Parsons spent his final hours.  “I’m still the girl from Golden,” she admits during the song’s chorus, a reminder that no matter how big her career gets, she’ll always be a small-town native. Later, with “This Town,” she stresses the importance of staying pleasant in a cozy town where everyone knows you, and during “Biscuits” — a song inspired by her mother’s advice to “kill ’em with kindness” — she explains some simple, yet important, things she’s learned her 26 years.

Musgraves recorded Pageant Material in a unique way, capturing the songs during a series of live studio sessions. The goal was to harness the energy of her concerts, rather than build a record track-by-track and overdub-by-overdub. To lighten the mood, she decorated Nashville’s historic RCA Studio A with fluorescent, life-size cacti and served fresh biscuits during breaks. She also brought a handful of plastic beauty pageant crowns into the studio and handed them out to her band, which included members of her touring lineup as well as pedal steel player Paul Franklin, drummer Fred Eltringham, and other top-tier players from the Nashville community. Musgraves pulled triple duty during the recording sessions, serving as singer, songwriter and co-producer on every track.

Since Pageant Material is such a personal project, it’s only appropriate that several family members contributed to the album’s creation. “This Town” begins with the voice of Musgraves’ beloved Memaw — grandmother Barbara Taylor — who worked as an ER nurse in Texas until her passing in December 2013.

“We always loved to get her going, telling stories about the crazy stuff she’d seen lately at work,” Musgraves remembers. “One night a couple years ago, we were all sittin’ around her in the living room and made her tell stories. I secretly pressed record on my phone. I just thought for some reason I should, never thinking I’d end up using it. This particular part of the record has been a source of sadness and happiness at the same time. I really miss her, but it makes me smile knowing that her voice has literally become embedded in my musical legacy.”

Likewise, Musgraves’ little sister, Kelly Christine Sutton, shot the photographs for the album, including the throwback cover art. On a record that deals so heavily with Musgraves’ roots — where she came from, how she grew up, and what her small hometown looks like from afar — the presence of her relatives adds an authentic touch.

“Pageant Material lives in a western-tinged world, and the songs are like little stories,” Musgraves says. “They set a vibe and a tone, and all make sense living in the same space. I think I’ll always be affected by growing up in a small town, so it still inspires a lot of my writing. But there are some viewpoints on this record that I hadn’t written from yet. More than anything, it’s life and society, making mistakes and my relationships that continue to inspire me.”

Nikki Mitchell Foundation Presents Jamey Johnson & Friends @ Marathon Music Works
Sep 23 @ 8:00 PM – 11:00 PM

NIKKI MITCHELL FOUNDATION PRESENTS “PLAY WHAT YOU WANT”

Jamey Johnson

Jerrod Niemann, Shooter Jennings, Jessi Colter, Alyssa Bonagura, Chris Hennessee, Waylon Payne, Whiskey Myers, Carters Chord, Kevin “Frenchie” Sciou

WED, SEPTEMBER 23, 2015

DOORS: 7:00 PM / SHOW: 8:00 PM

MARATHON MUSIC WORKS

NASHVILLE, TN

$28.00

THIS EVENT IS 21 AND OVER

ABSOLUTELY NO REFUNDS – NO EXCEPTIONS. LINEUPS AND TIMES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE.
GOV’T ISSUED ID REQUIRED. NO RE-ENTRY.

 

PLATINUM-SELLING COUNTRY ARTIST JAMEY JOHNSON WILL BE HEADLINING AN UNFORGETTABLE NIGHT OF MUSIC BENEFITTING THE NIKKI MITCHELL FOUNDATION. THE LINE UP WILL INCLUDE SPECIAL PERFORMANCES FROM THE TALENTED JERROD NIEMANN, SHOOTER JENNINGS, JESSI COLTER, ALYSSA BONAGURA, CHRIS HENNESSEE, WAYLON PAYNE, WHISKEY MYERS, CARTERS CHORD AND KEVIN “FRENCHIE” SCIOU ALONG WITH OTHERS TBA.

FOR THE 3RD YEAR IN A ROW, THE NIKKI MITCHELL FOUNDATION BRINGS A DIVERSE LINE UP OF MUSIC’S LEGENDARY ARTISTS, OUTLAW-COUNTRY PERFORMERS, AND RISING STARS TOGETHER ON ONE STAGE, IN HONOR OF NIKKI MITCHELL, THEIR DEAR FRIEND AND PRESIDENT/CEO OF WAYLON JENNINGS MUSIC FOR 23 YEARS, WHO PASSED AWAY FROM PANCREATIC CANCER IN 2013.

Sep
24
Thu
Kacey Musgraves @ Ryman Auditorium
Sep 24 @ 7:00 PM – 11:00 PM
LIVE AT THE RYMAN

Kacey Musgraves

2nd Show Added by Popular Demand!
Thursday, September 24, 2015
7:30 PM
$45, $35 & $25
Share page with AddThis

Two decades ago — long before Same Trailer Different Park turned her into a Grammy-winning country star with sold-out tours and Top 10 hits — Kacey Musgraves participated in her first (and only) beauty pageant.

“My hometown is pretty famous for its sweet potatoes,” she says, “and every year, they hold the Golden Sweet Potato Festival. They crown a Sweet Potato Queen and a Little Miss Tater Tot for little girls. I only competed for Little Miss Tater Tot once, when I was about three, and lost miserably to a girl in a sparklier dress.”

The pageant world, with its fake smiles and sky-high hairdos, wasn’t the best match for Musgraves. She was more interested in songwriting, finishing her very first tune at 9 years old and learning her first instrument, the mandolin, as a pre-teen. Years later, though, the peculiarities of daily life in a small town — along with the places she’s visited (and people she’s met) since moving away— are back on her mind.

It’s been years since Musgraves lived in Golden, Texas, her childhood home of roughly 600 people, but the whirlwind that followed Same Trailer Different Park — a debut album that topped the country charts, took home two Grammy Awards (including Country Album of the Year) and sent Musgraves halfway across the world on tour — made her think hard about where she came from. Pageant Material, her second album, pays tribute to those Bible Belt roots, shining a light on a hometown girl who’s grown up, expanded her worldview and done a lot of livin’ since skipping town. It’s an album about where she’s from and where she’s going, full of autobiographical details that are humorous one minute and heartwarming the next.

“I really wanted this album to have a classic feel, like a lot of the records I know and love,” says Musgraves, who name-checks artists like Willie Nelson, Glen Campbell and Ronnie Milsap as influences on Pageant Material’s easygoing stride. “I intended on it having a laid-back yet lush, slightly kitschy, western vibe. And most of all, I wanted it to feel like me.”

Appropriately, all thirteen of the album’s songs were co-written by Musgraves, who teamed up with the same group of songwriters who’d helped bring Same Trailer Different Park to life several years earlier. Those names may be familiar — Brandy Clark, Luke Laird, Shane McAnally and Josh Osborne, along with additions like Natalie Hemby and Ashley Arrison — but the songs are new, dreamt up during a songwriter’s retreat in West Texas as well a handful of sessions back home in Nashville.

During the gorgeous “Late to the Party,” Musgraves lingers with her boyfriend before a big get-together, knowing that he, not the party, is the real destination. She kicks back and enjoys life at a slower speed with “High Time,” whose twangy chorus — punctuated by a whistled riff worthy of a high-lonesome cowboy — doubles as a nod to the childhood years Musgraves spent performing western swing music. On “Dimestore Cowgirl,” she breezes through some of the more surreal highlights of her days on the road, from an early-morning European boat ride that took her band past the White Cliffs of Dover to a night spent in the same middle-of-nowhere motel where Gram Parsons spent his final hours.  “I’m still the girl from Golden,” she admits during the song’s chorus, a reminder that no matter how big her career gets, she’ll always be a small-town native. Later, with “This Town,” she stresses the importance of staying pleasant in a cozy town where everyone knows you, and during “Biscuits” — a song inspired by her mother’s advice to “kill ’em with kindness” — she explains some simple, yet important, things she’s learned her 26 years.

Musgraves recorded Pageant Material in a unique way, capturing the songs during a series of live studio sessions. The goal was to harness the energy of her concerts, rather than build a record track-by-track and overdub-by-overdub. To lighten the mood, she decorated Nashville’s historic RCA Studio A with fluorescent, life-size cacti and served fresh biscuits during breaks. She also brought a handful of plastic beauty pageant crowns into the studio and handed them out to her band, which included members of her touring lineup as well as pedal steel player Paul Franklin, drummer Fred Eltringham, and other top-tier players from the Nashville community. Musgraves pulled triple duty during the recording sessions, serving as singer, songwriter and co-producer on every track.

Since Pageant Material is such a personal project, it’s only appropriate that several family members contributed to the album’s creation. “This Town” begins with the voice of Musgraves’ beloved Memaw — grandmother Barbara Taylor — who worked as an ER nurse in Texas until her passing in December 2013.

“We always loved to get her going, telling stories about the crazy stuff she’d seen lately at work,” Musgraves remembers. “One night a couple years ago, we were all sittin’ around her in the living room and made her tell stories. I secretly pressed record on my phone. I just thought for some reason I should, never thinking I’d end up using it. This particular part of the record has been a source of sadness and happiness at the same time. I really miss her, but it makes me smile knowing that her voice has literally become embedded in my musical legacy.”

Likewise, Musgraves’ little sister, Kelly Christine Sutton, shot the photographs for the album, including the throwback cover art. On a record that deals so heavily with Musgraves’ roots — where she came from, how she grew up, and what her small hometown looks like from afar — the presence of her relatives adds an authentic touch.

“Pageant Material lives in a western-tinged world, and the songs are like little stories,” Musgraves says. “They set a vibe and a tone, and all make sense living in the same space. I think I’ll always be affected by growing up in a small town, so it still inspires a lot of my writing. But there are some viewpoints on this record that I hadn’t written from yet. More than anything, it’s life and society, making mistakes and my relationships that continue to inspire me.”

Sep
25
Fri
The Neighbourhood with Bad Suns and Hunny @ Ryman Auditorium
Sep 25 @ 8:00 PM – 11:00 PM

The Neighbourhood

with Bad Suns and Hunny
Friday, September 25, 2015
8:00 PM
Click here to enter to win a limited edition Hatch Show Print.

Praised for their “moody, atmospheric rock tracks” by Rolling Stone, The Neighbourhood enjoyed multiple successful tours and major festival appearances in 2013/2014 in support of their breakout debut album I Love You.  The 11-track debut spawned the band’s influential, double-platinum hit single “Sweater Weather,” which ruled radio and video platforms for months with one of the longest runs in 2013. Among other memorable songs on I Love You is follow-up single “Afraid,” commended by Billboard for its “edgy, subtle hooks,” which reached the top 5 at Alternative Radio. The album itself was widely acclaimed for its soaring textures and atmospheric themes, touted by Billboard as a “darkly moody album [that] aptly culls together indie rock and R&B.” In November 2014, the band also released a surprise rap-inspired mixtape, #000000 & #FFFFFF (the HTML color codes for black & white), which featured a host of notable guests including YG, French Montana, Raury and more.

Sep
26
Sat
Musicians Corner :Artist To Be Announced, Jeffrey James, Daphne Willis, Kirsten Arian, Jamie Kent @ Centennial Park
Sep 26 all-day

Our Fall 2015 Season takes place September 5 to October 31.

Musicians Corner, a program of The Conservancy for the Parthenon and Centennial Park, presents free weekly lawn parties in Nashville’s Centennial Park on Saturday afternoons in May, June, September and October.

Follow us on Twitter: @muscornernash
Follow us on Instagram: /MusCornerNash
Learn more and get performance schedules at www.musicianscornernashville.com

Musicians Corner is a program of The Conservancy for the Parthenon and Centennial Park, a 5019c)(3) nonprofit organization.

Pilgrimage Music and Cultural Festival @ Franklin, TN
Sep 26 all-day


WILCO * WILLIE NELSON * WEEZER
CAGE THE ELEPHANT * THE DECEMBERISTS * SHERYL CROW
BAND OF HORSES * DR. JOHN * JIMMY CLIFF * DAWES
CHRIS STAPLETON * PUNCH BROTHERS * IRON & WINE * NEKO CASE
TRAMPLED BY TURTLES * ST. PAUL & THE BROKEN BONES
THE LONE BELLOW * LUCIUS * PRESERVATION HALL JAZZ BAND
WILL HOGE * SAINT MOTEL * NIKKI LANE
CHARLES BRADLEY & HIS EXTRAORDINAIRES * JOHN & JACOB
HOLLY WILLIAMS * MADISEN WARD AND THE MAMA BEAR
BIG SAM’S FUNKY NATION * THE GRAND SOUTHERN * NAWASKINGFISH

THE EXPERIENCE OF PILGRIMAGE MUSIC & CULTURAL FESTIVAL

Like most great ideas, Pilgrimage Music & Cultural Festival was inspired by friendship, history, and the desire to create a meaningful experience. Two years ago, Musician and Franklin, TN resident Kevin Griffin was on a September morning jog through The Park at Harlinsdale, a century-old horse farm recently purchased by the City of Franklin. Kevin was so taken by the rolling hills, natural amphitheaters, and breathtaking vistas of the 230-acre farm, he envisioned it as a natural fit for a music festival venue. Considering Franklin’s place, Kevin wanted people to understand the beauty and rustic quality of Middle Tennessee in the fall, and with the blessing of the City, began to dream up a music festival to do it justice.

Partnered with lifelong buddies W. Brandt Wood and Michael Whelan, the trio aspired to highlight the diversity and community spirit of the New Orleans Jazz Fest, tailoring the best elements to Franklin– a richly historic town just 20 minutes south of Nashville. Like Jazz Fest, Pilgrimage will take place during the day, and offer a diverse yet renowned lineup of rock and roll, alt-country, bluegrass, jazz, indie, gospel and more. Performing on patina-clad stages reflecting the area’s aesthetic, many bands will “crank it down” and give a partly acoustic set specifically tailored to the day. Moreover, the fest will boast “Pilgri-mashups,” pairing artists together for special one-time collaborations on stage. The Little Pilgrims Stage will be more than a kids’ play area; it will feature a line-up of talented young musicians in their own right, to inspire and entertain kids and adults alike.

The region’s best food and drink will be on display at the Kitchen and Sippin’ stages at scheduled times throughout the weekend, and carefully selected food and merchant vendors will be featured in the Bazaar. When performances wrap at 7:30pm each day, guests can conveniently head back into the heart of downtown Franklin, within walking distance from the Park at Harlinsdale, to imbibe the best of the town’s restaurants, shops, and great weekend lineup of nighttime shows.

Ultimately, Pilgrimage Music & Cultural Festival invites folks of all ages on a journey to experience a myriad of musical styles, a bevy of food and beverages, and the rich regional spirit of Franklin, TN.

Sep
27
Sun
Pilgrimage Music and Cultural Festival @ Franklin, TN
Sep 27 all-day


WILCO * WILLIE NELSON * WEEZER
CAGE THE ELEPHANT * THE DECEMBERISTS * SHERYL CROW
BAND OF HORSES * DR. JOHN * JIMMY CLIFF * DAWES
CHRIS STAPLETON * PUNCH BROTHERS * IRON & WINE * NEKO CASE
TRAMPLED BY TURTLES * ST. PAUL & THE BROKEN BONES
THE LONE BELLOW * LUCIUS * PRESERVATION HALL JAZZ BAND
WILL HOGE * SAINT MOTEL * NIKKI LANE
CHARLES BRADLEY & HIS EXTRAORDINAIRES * JOHN & JACOB
HOLLY WILLIAMS * MADISEN WARD AND THE MAMA BEAR
BIG SAM’S FUNKY NATION * THE GRAND SOUTHERN * NAWASKINGFISH

THE EXPERIENCE OF PILGRIMAGE MUSIC & CULTURAL FESTIVAL

Like most great ideas, Pilgrimage Music & Cultural Festival was inspired by friendship, history, and the desire to create a meaningful experience. Two years ago, Musician and Franklin, TN resident Kevin Griffin was on a September morning jog through The Park at Harlinsdale, a century-old horse farm recently purchased by the City of Franklin. Kevin was so taken by the rolling hills, natural amphitheaters, and breathtaking vistas of the 230-acre farm, he envisioned it as a natural fit for a music festival venue. Considering Franklin’s place, Kevin wanted people to understand the beauty and rustic quality of Middle Tennessee in the fall, and with the blessing of the City, began to dream up a music festival to do it justice.

Partnered with lifelong buddies W. Brandt Wood and Michael Whelan, the trio aspired to highlight the diversity and community spirit of the New Orleans Jazz Fest, tailoring the best elements to Franklin– a richly historic town just 20 minutes south of Nashville. Like Jazz Fest, Pilgrimage will take place during the day, and offer a diverse yet renowned lineup of rock and roll, alt-country, bluegrass, jazz, indie, gospel and more. Performing on patina-clad stages reflecting the area’s aesthetic, many bands will “crank it down” and give a partly acoustic set specifically tailored to the day. Moreover, the fest will boast “Pilgri-mashups,” pairing artists together for special one-time collaborations on stage. The Little Pilgrims Stage will be more than a kids’ play area; it will feature a line-up of talented young musicians in their own right, to inspire and entertain kids and adults alike.

The region’s best food and drink will be on display at the Kitchen and Sippin’ stages at scheduled times throughout the weekend, and carefully selected food and merchant vendors will be featured in the Bazaar. When performances wrap at 7:30pm each day, guests can conveniently head back into the heart of downtown Franklin, within walking distance from the Park at Harlinsdale, to imbibe the best of the town’s restaurants, shops, and great weekend lineup of nighttime shows.

Ultimately, Pilgrimage Music & Cultural Festival invites folks of all ages on a journey to experience a myriad of musical styles, a bevy of food and beverages, and the rich regional spirit of Franklin, TN.

Nashville Sunday Night Presents: The Damnwells @ 3rd and Lindsley
Sep 27 @ 8:00 PM – 10:00 PM

Artist

Indie rock band The Damnwells came together 15 years ago in a downtown New York City storage unit hastily repurposed as a rehearsal room and imploded onstage at what should have been a career pinnacle: a live appearance to promote the release of a documentary about the band and its journey. Now, for the first time since 2006, the founding members have reconvened to release the band’s most definitive album, appropriately titled, The Damnwells.

The Damnwells are Alex Dezen lead vocals, guitar, piano; David Chernis, lead guitar; Ted Hudson bass; and Steven Terry drums/percussion. The band has released five studio albums, been the subject of a documentary, Golden Days, had a top 20 Triple A charting song, and toured relentlessly, sharing stages with The Fray, the Dixie Chicks, Old 97s, Cheap Trick, and Bob Dylan, among others.

At the core of the band is the bond of Alex Dezen and bassist Ted Hudson. The two met at Bard College in 1996 and have remained the band nucleus since its inception. The original lineup also includes drummer Steven Terry, who formerly played with Ryan Adams’ critically acclaimed band Whiskeytown, and seasoned vet lead guitarist David Chernis.

Steven and David left The Damnwells disillusioned with the music industry, and focused their post band life on starting families. Alex and Ted remained musically active, soldiering for two more Damnwells albums with varied accomplished musicians from their inner creative circle. Alex also released a highly personal solo project consisting of four EPs. Most significantly, in his time away from the band being a full-time entity, Alex emerged a formidable professional songwriter, working with such diverse artists as Justin Bieber, The Dixie Chicks, Dave Grohl, Gary Louris of The Jayhawks, Jason Derulo, Christina Perri, Genevieve Schatz of Company of Thieves, and Kelly Clarkson.

The Damnwells official final gig was in Phoenix at the band’s documentary release party. What was supposed to be a celebratory time was anything but—members of the band were weary of the road and the fickle and ever-changing music industry, and tired of each other. A smashed guitar and icy tensions remain stinging memories from that gig.

“That last show felt like we were playing our funeral,” Alex recalls. After that final gig, the band members didn’t speak for years. It was album producer Salim Nourallah (Old 97s) who first suggested the reunion.  “When we first played together, I was scared, but when we started going through old songs it was epiphanic,” Alex says.

The resulting self-titled album is the band’s most sharply focused collection of literate, heartfelt, and hook-laden Americana. The lead-off single, “Lost,” is blissful melancholia about trying to find your way in a post breakup landscape. The raucous and rootsy “Kentexas” ponders the mischievous wonders of being aimless after the demise of a relationship. On “Kill Me,” The Damnwells finally document the band’s wry sense of humor with witty pop culture commentary blasted within euphoric power-pop. The 11-song album concludes with the stately folk of the heartbreaking “None Of These Things.”

Sep
30
Wed
George Ezra @ Ryman Auditorium
Sep 30 @ 7:30 PM – 11:00 PM
LIVE AT THE RYMAN

George Ezra

Wednesday, September 30, 2015
7:30 PM
$30 & $25
Share page with AddThis
Oct
1
Thu
An Evening with Lucero @ The Cannery Ballroom
Oct 1 @ 7:30 PM – 11:00 PM

Sailor Jerry presents: An Evening with Lucero

Lucero

→ Official Site

LUCERO: ALL A MAN SHOULD DO – By Brian Venable

You could say we were one of the lucky ones, starting this band in April of ’98 without a clue as to what we were doing. We were getting tired of the steady punk rock and metal diet and we wanted to try our hand at country songs, or do our best Tom Waits/Pogues impersonation.

The trick there was that we couldn’t really play our instruments! I had never played guitar before and Ben Nichols (lead singer, guitar) had only played bass in other bands. Finding Roy Berry (drummer) and John C. Stubblefield (bassist) solidified the line up and being hidden away in Memphis allowed us to woodshed, experiment with different sounds and create one that was ours alone.

Eventually we got out of town, and playing 250 shows year not only made us tight as a band but as a family as well. We are still one of the few bands out there with the original line up from almost the beginning, and it shows.

Picking up Rick Steff on keys allowed us to expand the sound and grow musically. Being able to play whatever we could think up in our heads and having the music we loved and grew up on motivate and inspire us to try new things and take chances. We realized that if you added some horns to Ben’s lyrics that it took it to the next step, from sad bastard country rock to soul and R&B and we realized we were a Memphis band and came by it honest. We have always brought Memphis with us wherever we went and this just proved it.

We came out screaming on 1372 Overton Park. Big sound, bigger horns – like a kid with a new toy we put them on everything and loved it! This record was a marked departure from the previous sound and announcement of way things we’re gonna be now!

While 1372 Overton Park was written and the horns added after the fact, Women & Work was written with the horns in mind so it was a little less gung ho and was starting to settle in nicely. Women & Work is one of the best modern Southern rock records in my opinion and the song “On My Way Downtown” has almost surpassed “Tears Don’t Matter Much” as the crowd favorite… almost!

This brings us to the new record. All A Man Should Do contains some of the most resonant lyrics Ben Nichols has ever written, lyrics that read like chapters from his life on the duality of relationships, getting older, finding where you want to be in this world, and musically we are broadening our sound. Working with producer Ted Hutt for a third time at the famous Ardent Studios, we felt comfortable enough to take some chances with a palette of new tones that sound understated yet powerful, bringing life to the stories behind the lyrics without overshadowing them.

It’s also the first time we’ve ever put a cover song on a record, with a full band version of big star’s “I Fell in Love with a Girl”, and having Jody from Big Star sing back-up vocals makes it that more special and amazing. This is a Memphis record in the greatest sense and a perfect finish to the three-part love letter to a city that brought us up and made us what we are today.

“I was 15 years old in 1989. This record sounds like the record I wanted to make when I was 15. It just took 25 years of mistakes to get it done.”  – Ben Nichols

 

“Having Big Star actually sing on your cover of a Big Star song that you’re recording at Ardent Studios – it doesn’t get much more exciting than that.” – Ben Nichols

Oct
2
Fri
Austin City Limits
Oct 2 all-day

941478_10151428348818030_846021407_n
Taking place at Zilker Park in Austin, TX, ACL Festival has grown to 2 weekends, 8 stages and over 130 bands. Lineup, Tickets + more: www.aclfestival.com

Oct
3
Sat
Austin City Limits
Oct 3 all-day

941478_10151428348818030_846021407_n
Taking place at Zilker Park in Austin, TX, ACL Festival has grown to 2 weekends, 8 stages and over 130 bands. Lineup, Tickets + more: www.aclfestival.com

Musicians Corner : Jessie Baylin, Artist To Be Announced, The Howlin’ Brothers, MYZICA, Emoni Wilkins @ Centennial Park
Oct 3 all-day

Our Fall 2015 Season takes place September 5 to October 31.

Musicians Corner, a program of The Conservancy for the Parthenon and Centennial Park, presents free weekly lawn parties in Nashville’s Centennial Park on Saturday afternoons in May, June, September and October.

Follow us on Twitter: @muscornernash
Follow us on Instagram: /MusCornerNash
Learn more and get performance schedules at www.musicianscornernashville.com

Musicians Corner is a program of The Conservancy for the Parthenon and Centennial Park, a 5019c)(3) nonprofit organization.

Lightning 100 Presents Brandi Carlile @ Ryman Auditorium
Oct 3 @ 7:00 PM – 11:00 PM
LIVE AT THE RYMAN

Brandi Carlile

Saturday, October 3, 2015
8:00 PM
$66, $40.50 & $33.50
On Sale Friday, June 19 at 10 AM
Share page with AddThis
If purchasing tickets in person at the Ryman Box Office or any Ticketmaster outlet, your spot in line will be determined by a lottery. For details, click here
Oct
4
Sun
Austin City Limits
Oct 4 all-day

941478_10151428348818030_846021407_n
Taking place at Zilker Park in Austin, TX, ACL Festival has grown to 2 weekends, 8 stages and over 130 bands. Lineup, Tickets + more: www.aclfestival.com

Beach House with Jessica Pratt @ Ryman Auditorium
Oct 4 @ 7:30 PM – 11:00 PM

Beach House

with Jessica Pratt
Sunday, October 4, 2015
7:30 PM
$28.50 • $35 Day of Show
Share page with AddThis
Click here to enter to win a limited edition Hatch Show Print.

Beach House is Victoria Legrand and Alex Scally. We have been a band for over a decade living and working in Baltimore, MD. Depression Cherry is our fifth full-length record. This record follows the release of our self-titled album in 2006, Devotion in 2008, Teen Dream in 2010, and Bloom in 2012. Depression Cherry was recorded at Studio in the Country in Bogalusa, Louisiana from November ’14 through January ’15. This time period crossed the anniversaries of both John Lennon’s and Roy Orbison’s death.

In general, this record shows a return to simplicity, with songs structured around a melody and a few instruments, with live drums playing a far lesser role. With the growing success of Teen Dream and Bloom, the larger stages and bigger rooms naturally drove us towards a louder, more aggressive place; a place farther from our natural tendencies. Here, we continue to let ourselves evolve while fully ignoring the commercial context in which we exist.

Nashville Sunday Night Presents: Kodaline with Good Old War @ 3rd and Lindsley
Oct 4 @ 8:00 PM – 10:00 PM
Artist
That Kodaline are ready to release their second album has still to sink in with the men who made it. The Dublin quartet didn’t plan to follow up last year’s 350,000-selling In A Perfect World so promptly. In fact, they didn’t plan at all. Sparked by an experiment that inspired them to shake up their sound, the band started recording and couldn’t stop. Just eight weeks later, Coming Up For Air was complete.Kodaline were still on tour in support of their debut – which went Top 3 in Britain, spent nine weeks at No.1 in their native Ireland and made inroads in Europe and the States – when they received an invitation to spend a week in L.A. with producer Jacknife Lee.“We didn’t regard it as an album session,” insists guitarist Mark Prendergast. “We thought we’d have some fun and see what happened. Jacknife is Irish and his track record is unbelievable. We weren’t about to turn that down.”What Kodaline didn’t expect was to leave L.A. with an entirely new approach to making music, an affection for synths and their second album’s epic first single, Honest, already written.

“Jacknife opened our eyes to different ways of working,” explains bassist Jason Boland. “He gave us a lesson in experimentation. The way he records is amazing. He has everything in the studio turned on, synths all over the place, instruments everywhere. If you want to play something, you pick it up.”

“He asked if we felt out of our comfort zone,” continues drummer Vinny May. “Yes? Then you’re on the right track. We didn’t set out to make any electronic music. We’ve always had synths in the studio; this time, we chose to use them. We put strange sounds in places we weren’t sure would work, then listened back a day later and discovered they were key to the song.”

Back in Britain, as soon as festival season finished, an inspired Kodaline set to work on the album they were itching to make. Electronics played a key part, adding depth, new dimensions and a harder edge to the band’s trademark soaring choruses and widescreen sound.

Coming Up For Air’s sense of adventure stems from its lack of planning. Nothing was set in stone. Every song dictated its own direction. When Play The Game suggested a gospel singer, it got one (Christina Matovu). When the gorgeous, acoustic guitar-backed Better called out for strings, they come courtesy of an orchestra in Prague.

Coming Up For Air may be a sonic step on, but at its core remains Kodaline’s ability to connect instantly with an audience, to share the emotions in their songs and to pull the listener in to their world. It’s a smart, sharp, sophisticated album, by a band only just discovering what they’re capable of.

 

Oct
5
Mon
Foo Fighters with Gary Clark Jr. @ Bridgestone Arena
Oct 5 @ 8:00 PM – 11:00 PM

 

foo fighters nashville bridgestone

DATE

Oct 5 , 2015

TICKET PRICES

$75.00, $55.00, $35.00

AVAILABILITY

On Sale 12.05.14 10:00 am

 

In the wake of Sonic Highways’ climb into the top 3 of charts worldwide and the announcement of the band’s first ever U.S. stadium dates, Foo Fighters have now unveiled a full North American stadium/arena/amphitheater assault for summer/fall 2015. This most massive North American on the road undertaking in FF history will see Dave Grohl, Taylor Hawkins, Nate Mendel, Chris Shiflett and Pat Smear headline multiple historic U.S. venues for the first time.

Beat the Bots: Box Office Only Presale this Saturday, November 22nd at 10am.

Tickets for the Foo Fighters will first go on sale via the BEAT THE BOTS: BOX OFFICE ONLY PRE-SALE beginning this Saturday, November 22nd at 10am at the Bridgestone Arena box office and will end at 3pm (while supplies last).  Line up begins at 9am that morning on the Bridgestone Arena plaza at the corner of 5th Ave and Broadway.  Ticket limit for this presale: (2) Floor Tickets or (4) Seated Tickets per person.

Oct
7
Wed
Of Monsters and Men with Amason @ Ryman Auditorium
Oct 7 @ 7:00 PM – 11:00 PM

Of Monsters and Men

with Amason
Wednesday, October 7, 2015
7:30 PM
SOLD OUT!
Share page with AddThis
Click here to enter to win a limited edition Hatch Show Print.

OF MONSTERS AND MEN have come a long way from their native Iceland. They quickly became a phenomenon in 2011 with the quadruple-platinum “Little Talks” and their chart-topping debut, My Head Is An Animal, which has since moved 2 million copies worldwide. Since then, the group have delivered rapturous performances at festivals such as  Lollapalooza, Bonnaroo, Coachella, Newport Folk Festival, Osheaga, Glastonbury, Reading and Leeds, Pukkelpop, and Splendour in the Grass as well as at countless sold out headline shows the world over. They have charmed TV audiences with appearances on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, Late Night with Jimmy Fallon, The Graham Norton Show, and Saturday Night Live. In the midst of it all, they lent the single “Dirty Paws” to a trailer for The Secret Life of Walter Mitty and the iPhone 5 introduction video, while “Silhouettes” was featured on The Hunger Games: Catching Fire soundtrack.

LIGHTNING 100 PRESENTS: Rhiannon Giddens @ Marathon Music Works
Oct 7 @ 8:00 PM – 11:45 PM
Rhiannon Giddens

Rhiannon Giddens

It was toward the end of the T Bone Burnett–curated September 2013 Another Day, Another Time concert at New York City’s Town Hall—a celebration of the early ’60s folk revival that had inspired the Joel and Ethan Coen film Inside Llewyn Davis—when singer Rhiannon Giddens indisputably stole the show. Performing Odetta’s “Water Boy” with, as the New York Times put it, “the fervor of a spiritual, the yips of a folk holler, and the sultry insinuation of the blues,” Giddens brought the star-studded audience to its feet. She was the talk of the lobby during intermission as those attendees unfamiliar with her Grammy Award–winning work as a member of African-American folk interpreters Carolina Chocolate Drops wondered who exactly Rhiannon Giddens was, with her elegant bearing, prodigious voice, and fierce spirit.

Backstage, Burnett already knew the answer and was immediately moved to ask if she was ready to make her own record. “It was clear the first time I heard her at rehearsal that Rhiannon is next in a long line of singers that includes Marian Anderson, Ethel Waters, Rosetta Tharp, Odetta, Mahalia Jackson, Nina Simone,” Burnett says. “We need that person in our culture. She is, in fact, that person in our culture.”

On her Nonesuch solo debut Tomorrow Is My Turn, Giddens and Burnett revisit “Water Boy,” its Odetta-arranged work-song rhythm serving as both provocation and a statement of power. Giddens delivers an equally thunderous rendition, one made all the more striking when placed between a gentle, ruminative interpretation of Dolly Parton’s “Don’t Let It Trouble Your Mind” and a version of Hank Cochran’s “She’s Got You,” popularized by Patsy Cline, that Giddens imbues with “an old-timey R&B vibe,” abetted by Carolina Chocolate Drops band-mate Hubby Jenkins. The breadth of musical vision on Tomorrow Is My Turn fulfills the promise of that brief but stunning star turn at Town Hall. The album incorporates gospel, jazz, blues, and country, plus a hint of proto-rock and roll, and Giddens displays an emotional range to match her dazzling vocal prowess throughout.

Reviving, interpreting, and recasting traditional material from a variety of sources has been central to Giddens’ career, especially in her groundbreaking work with the Carolina Chocolate Drops (CCDs). With their two Nonesuch albums, the CCDs have investigated and promoted the foundational role African-American performers and songwriters have played in folk-music history, while making recordings that are vital, contemporary, and exuberant.

With Tomorrow Is My Turn, Giddens has embarked on a more personal sort of journey, but with a nod towards history as well. She’s chosen from a broad array of songs associated with the female artists who are her musical and spiritual forebears and fashioned an album that serves both as patchwork autobiography and as a subtle tribute to these artists and their often hard-won legacies.

Giddens charts a clear path through Tomorrow Is My Turn: “We start off with the unknown and end up with the specific.” Opening track “Last Kind Words” dates back to a rare 1930 78 “race record” and a largely unknown singer named Geeshie Wiley. To Giddens, “The timbre of the singer’s voice, the uniqueness of the chord structure…it reminds me of my grandmother and that era.”

Though she had recorded more songs than could fit on the final album, Giddens and Burnett spent considerable time pondering a track sequence could best help tell the story Giddens was constructing. It wasn’t until they decided at the 11th hour to cut “Last Kind Words”—a song they’d come across independent of each other—that they found the focus they’d been searching for. As Giddens explains, “I made the record with the idea of these songs either written or performed by American women. It’s sort of a survey. We know a lot about most of the people represented on the record, but I thought it would be really cool to open up with ‘Last Kind Words’ because most people have no idea who Geeshie was or what she did; it kind of represents every woman from her time, every unknown black woman toiling away. I really liked that idea. Who knows how many more were making incredible music, and writing incredible songs like that, living these lives?”

Her take on the traditional “Round About the Mountain,” inspired by African-American mezzo-soprano Florence Quivar’s recording, combines gospel fervor with operatic intensity. A version of Sister Rosetta Tharpe’s “Up Above My Head,” underscored by fuzz-toned rockabilly guitar, is, conversely, joyful call-and-response testifying. “O Love Is Teasin’,” popularized by the Kentucky-reared “mother of folk” Jean Ritchie, has a melancholic Celtic air, while her updating of “Black Is the Color” swaps somber for seductive. Its yearning lyric, largely rewritten by Giddens and propelled by a practically club-worthy R&B swing, is autobiographical—recast from a tribute to a departed partner into a love song for her very-much-alive Irish husband. (“He’s a ginger, but otherwise it’s pretty accurate,” quips Giddens in her album liner notes.)

The life that Giddens explores at the climax of Tomorrow Is My Turn is her own creative one, on the lilting, self-penned ballad “Angel City.” Though she regards herself far more as singer than songwriter, “Angel City,” composed in the course of a single night during the recording of the Burnett-helmed The New Basement Tapes project, fits perfectly at the close of the set, gently paying homage to the elder artists whose work comprise the rest of the album. “It was these women, these artists, who had helped me, who had come with me on this journey, and here are lyrics that represented that.”

Giddens’ journey, in a larger sense, began in the Piedmont region of North Carolina, where she was raised—an area with a rich legacy of old-time music, black and white, that Giddens would explore in depth after college. Much like the classically trained Odetta, she originally envisioned a career in opera and earned a degree in vocal performance at Oberlin Conservatory. A side interest in contra-dance calling led her towards old-time music. That became her overarching passion when she returned to the Greensboro area. She met her soon-to-be band members at 2005’s Black Banjo Gathering in Boone, North Carolina, and got schooled in the Piedmont’s traditional music by Joe Thompson, an elderly African-American fiddle player who passed on to Giddens and her cohorts many of the songs that would comprise their early repertoire.

As they began discussing a solo record, Burnett told Giddens, “Now is your time. Why don’t you just make the record you’ve always dreamed of?” And she had, in fact, been mentally preparing a rundown of songs she wanted to interpret and artists she wanted to acknowledge. Giddens found further inspiration via the choreographer Twyla Tharp, when Tharp was developing Cornbread Duet, a dance piece set to a suite of songs by CCDs that had its world premiere this past April at the Brooklyn Academy of Music. Among the tracks Tharp had selected was the brash “Ruby, Are You Mad at Your Man?,” from CCDs’ second Nonesuch album, Leaving Eden. Giddens was explaining to Tharp that CCDs was in flux, its lineup changing, its next move undecided. They were listening to “Ruby” and, Giddens recounts, “It’s a really cool, strong, woman’s song, and Twyla asked ‘Who’s Ruby? I want to know who Ruby is. I think that’s what you should do: you should find Ruby.’ And that idea stayed with me.

“I had already started putting together a list of songs that didn’t really fit into the Chocolate Drops world,” Giddens explains. “I had this short list and at the top was ‘Tomorrow Is My Turn’ [co-written by Charles Aznanour but immortalized by Nina Simone]. Seeing Nina do it is revelatory. I was checking her out for some reason, to get a little deeper into what she did, and I stumbled across this YouTube video of her singing it live. I knew she’d gone through a lot of hard times, as so many people did in that time period. Watching her sing this song, with the words ‘tomorrow is my turn,’ I began to think about the struggle of her and women like her. It really hit me.” The significance of this song led Giddens to make it the title of the album as well. “Other songs started getting on my list and they were all by women or interpreted by women,” she says.

When Giddens sent the list to T Bone, he said, “Great, let’s do it all.” Well, almost all of it. He suggested Giddens swap out one Dolly Parton song she’d selected in favor of Parton’s lovely “Don’t Let It Trouble Your Mind.” Says Giddens, “That is where T Bone’s encyclopedic knowledge of music came in handy. He said, ‘I always wanted someone to do this song and no one has done it since Dolly.’ I had to go find it and listen. T Bone is so good at setting the table. He sets the table with a fine linen tablecloth, beautiful dishes, silver urns, everything is top notch, but you have to bring the food. You have to bring the meat of it, and he will take care of the rest. It’s a very cool way of doing things.”

Tomorrow Is My Turn was recorded in Los Angeles and Nashville, with a multi-generational group of players whom Burnett assembled. Among them are fiddle player Gabe Witcher and double bassist Paul Kowert of label-mates Punch Brothers; percussionist Jack Ashford of Motown’s renowned Funk Brothers; inventive drummer and Burnett stalwart Jay Bellerose; veteran folk-blues guitarist Colin Linden; legendary backup singer Tata Vega; and Nashville session great, bassist Dennis Crouch. Giddens enthuses, “We had Dennis and Paul on stand-up bass at the same time on some of these tracks. They are all ‘musicians’ musicians’ and they did cool stuff they don’t always get the opportunity to play. It was a bit of a challenge for them too, all these different kinds of music; every day was something new. We’d start the day by watching the original inspiration for the song on YouTube, and then we would go cut it. They were a diverse group of people, but it felt like a real band.” Giddens’ bandmates from the Drops—multi-instrumentalist Hubby Jenkins, cellist Malcolm Parson, and multi-instrumentalist Rowan Corbett—are part of her touring band for Tomorrow Is My Turn.

Through the process of creating this album with such a disparate set of musicians and practically a century’s worth of songs, she also illustrates the democratic way American music has taken shape and evolved: “The strength of American music is in bringing all these things together—Celtic, gospel, jazz, folk—all these things that make American music great. Putting them side by side and having a production that pulls it all into a cohesive whole shows how related all these things are.”

The songs here, says Giddens, “are all facets of the human condition.” Taken together, they answer the question Twyla Tharp posed at the beginning of Giddens’ solo adventure. Tomorrow Is My Turn is a composite portrait of “Ruby,” of America, and of Giddens herself, whose turn is clearly right now.

—Michael Hill

Oct
9
Fri
Austin City Limits
Oct 9 all-day

941478_10151428348818030_846021407_n
Taking place at Zilker Park in Austin, TX, ACL Festival has grown to 2 weekends, 8 stages and over 130 bands. Lineup, Tickets + more: www.aclfestival.com

Florence and the Machine @ Ascend Amphitheater
Oct 9 @ 7:00 PM – 11:00 PM
More Info AboutFlorence and the Machine

Florence and the Machine

Ascend Amphitheater,  Nashville, TN

FriOct 9, 2015 07:00 PM

Please Note: **All events are Rain or Shine** Box Office is only open on event days.
Ben Rector with Judah & the Lion @ Ryman Auditorium
Oct 9 @ 8:00 PM – 11:00 PM
LIVE AT THE RYMAN

Ben Rector

with Judah & the Lion
Friday, October 9, 2015
8:00 PM
$35 & $25
On Sale Thursday, July 23 at 10 AM
Share page with AddThis
If purchasing tickets in person at the Ryman Box Office or any Ticketmaster outlet, your spot in line will be determined by a lottery. For details, click here

Eight years after he began touring while at the University of Arkansas and two years after his first entry into the Top Twenty on the Billboard Album Chart, Ben Rector is back with a new album and is feeling Brand New (August 28, Aptly Named Recordings).
The singer-songwriter’s newest album marks a return to the spirit of his youth, when he was a music-crazed teenager playing guitar in his Tulsa bedroom. At that time, every new song was a discovery, and turning those songs into a career was just a dream. Since then, the twenty-eight year old has made that dream a reality, independently selling over 250,000 albums and 2,000,000 downloads. His four studio albums and 2014’s Live In Denver have repeatedly put him on top of the iTunes charts, leading to sold-out shows to fans who sing along with every word in theaters across the country. Rector has written hundreds of songs and played thousands of bills in his young career, but in the writing and recording of Brand New, he re-discovered the energy of his early days, with songs that have all the punch, power and promise of a debut record. Filled with rich string arrangements, percussion, pounding piano chords and effortless melodies, Brand New sounds anthemic. At the same time, its message is both sincere and humble, anchored by songs that are honest and meaningful. It’s pop music with a purpose.

Oct
10
Sat
Austin City Limits
Oct 10 all-day

941478_10151428348818030_846021407_n
Taking place at Zilker Park in Austin, TX, ACL Festival has grown to 2 weekends, 8 stages and over 130 bands. Lineup, Tickets + more: www.aclfestival.com

Lightning 100 Presents Green River Ordinance with Lucie Silvas @ Exit / In
Oct 10 all-day

Lightning 100 Presents:

Green River Ordinance

Lucie Silvas

SAT, OCTOBER 10, 2015

DOORS: 8:00 PM / SHOW: 9:00 PM

EXIT/IN

NASHVILLE, TN

$15.00 – $18.00

THIS EVENT IS 18 AND OVER

Absolutely no refunds – no exceptions. Lineups and times are subject to change.
Gov’t issued ID required. No re-entry.

Green River Ordinance

Green River Ordinance

OVER THE DECADE-LONG JOURNEY FROM THEIR FIRST INCARNATION AS 13 AND 14 YEAR OLD KIDS IN FORT WORTH, TEXAS TO THE UPCOMING RELEASE OF THEIR LATEST EP, “CHASING DOWN THE WIND,” GREEN RIVER ORDINANCE HAS EVOLVED STEADILY. “CHASING DOWN THE WIND” FEATURES THE CONTINUED GROWTH OF GREEN RIVER ORDINANCE’S HONEST, HOPEFUL SONGWRITING, AND SOARING HARMONIES. WRITTEN ON THE BANKS OF THE CANEY FORK RIVER IN RURAL TENNESSEE, THEIR NEW EP CAPTURES THE SPIRIT AND FREEDOM THAT COMES FROM ESCAPING THE RUSH OF THE BIG CITY AND REDISCOVERING THE SIMPLE THINGS IN LIFE. RELEASED ON 6.18.13, “CHASING DOWN THE WIND” DEBUTED AT #15 ON ITUNES OVERALL, #1 ON THE SINGER-SONGWRITER CHART, IN THE BILLBOARD TOP 100, #6 ON THE BILLBOARD FOLK CHART, #26 ON BILLBOARD ROCK, AND WAS THE #88 MOST SOLD ALBUM IN THE COUNTRY.

GRO’S INTENSITY AND STRONG FAN CONNECTION PROMPTED EMI TO SIGN THEM TO CAPITOL RECORDS AND IN 2009, THE BAND’S DEBUT ALBUM, “OUT OF MY HANDS,” SHOT TO THE TOP OF THE BILLBOARD CHARTS AND CATAPULTED THEIR TWO SINGLES “COME ON” AND “ON YOUR OWN” INTO THE TOP 40. GRO HAS SHARED STAGES WITH ACTS LIKE BON JOVI, TRAIN, NEEDTOBREATHE, ZAC BROWN, COUNTING CROWS, AND THE GOO GOO DOLLS AMONG MANY OTHERS. GRO HAS HAD THEIR MUSIC PLAYED ON 56 NETWORK AND CABLE SHOWS, IN THREE FILMS, AND HAD THEIR VIDEOS FEATURED ON MTV, VH1 & CMT. GRO’S INDEPENDENT FOLLOW UP RECORD, UNDER FIRE, PROPELLED BY THE SUCCESS OF THE SINGLES “DANCING SHOES” AND “HEART OF ME” IN BOTH COUNTRY & HOT AC FORMATS, CONTINUED TO PUSH THE BAND’S NATIONAL SUCCESS REACHING THE BILLBOARD TOP 100 CHART.

WALKING THE LINES OF COUNTRY, ROCK, POP, AND FOLK, GREEN RIVER ORDINANCE IS A BAND THAT CONSTANTLY CHALLENGES THE BORDERS OF GENRE. HOWEVER AS THEIR MUSIC CONTINUES TO MATURE AND CHANGE, GRO STILL HOLDS TRUE TO THE PURSUIT OF MUSIC THAT SPEAKS TO THE SOUL AND MOVES YOUR FEET.

Lucie Silvas
Born in the UK and raised part of her life in New Zealand by her Kiwi Dad and Scottish Mother… Lucie Silvas grew up listening to her parents favourites from Ray Charles to Nat king Cole to James Taylor and Roberta Flack. She started playing the piano and writing songs at age 10 but wasn’t exposed to the music industry until she was 17 when she went out on the road as a backing singer for British singer/songwriter Judie Tzuke. A few years later she released her debut album “Breathe In” and toured extensively around Europe for the following years with both her debut and second album. Lucie has worked and duetted with many artists including Jamie Cullum, Elton John, Lionel Richie and Jamiroquai. After selling over a million albums in Europe alone and achieving success for both her own music and songs she had written for other artists, Lucie moved to Nashville where she performed with various artists including Kacey Musgraves. Lucie recently returned from a run of shows opening for the legendary Tom Jones, performing at notable venues such as The Ryman Auditorium and the Atlantic Symphony Hall. Amongst performing and songwriting this year, Lucie finished recording her much anticipated and long overdue album featuring her newest single, “Letters To Ghosts,” which was just released on iTunes. All the songs were co-written and co-produced by Lucie and the track “Roots” was featured on the US TV show THE CLIENT LIST.
Musicians Corner : Tyler Bryant & The Shakedown, Liz Longley, Artist To Be Announced, Matt Brown @ Centennial Park
Oct 10 all-day

Our Fall 2015 Season takes place September 5 to October 31.

Musicians Corner, a program of The Conservancy for the Parthenon and Centennial Park, presents free weekly lawn parties in Nashville’s Centennial Park on Saturday afternoons in May, June, September and October.

Follow us on Twitter: @muscornernash
Follow us on Instagram: /MusCornerNash
Learn more and get performance schedules at www.musicianscornernashville.com

Musicians Corner is a program of The Conservancy for the Parthenon and Centennial Park, a 5019c)(3) nonprofit organization.

Grace Potter and the Nocturnals with Lake Street Drive @ Ascend Amphitheater
Oct 10 @ 7:30 PM – 11:00 PM

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Get tickets on May 08 at 12:00 PM CDT.

Ben Rector with Judah & the Lion @ Ryman Auditorium
Oct 10 @ 8:00 PM – 11:00 PM

Ben Rector

with Judah & the Lion
Saturday, October 10, 2015
8:00 PM
$35 & $25
Share page with AddThis

Eight years after he began touring while at the University of Arkansas and two years after his first entry into the Top Twenty on the Billboard Album Chart, Ben Rector is back with a new album and is feeling Brand New (August 28, Aptly Named Recordings).

The singer-songwriter’s newest album marks a return to the spirit of his youth, when he was a music-crazed teenager playing guitar in his Tulsa bedroom. At that time, every new song was a discovery, and turning those songs into a career was just a dream. Since then, the twenty-eight year old has made that dream a reality, independently selling over 250,000 albums and 2,000,000 downloads. His four studio albums and 2014’s Live In Denver have repeatedly put him on top of the iTunes charts, leading to sold-out shows to fans who sing along with every word in theaters across the country. Rector has written hundreds of songs and played thousands of bills in his young career, but in the writing and recording of Brand New, he re-discovered the energy of his early days, with songs that have all the punch, power and promise of a debut record. Filled with rich string arrangements, percussion, pounding piano chords and effortless melodies, Brand New sounds anthemic. At the same time, its message is both sincere and humble, anchored by songs that are honest and meaningful. It’s pop music with a purpose.

Oct
11
Sun
Austin City Limits
Oct 11 all-day

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Taking place at Zilker Park in Austin, TX, ACL Festival has grown to 2 weekends, 8 stages and over 130 bands. Lineup, Tickets + more: www.aclfestival.com

Nashville Sunday Night Presents: HoneyHoney @ 3rd and Lindsley
Oct 11 @ 8:00 PM – 10:00 PM

Artist

The third full-length effort from L.A.-based duo HONEYHONEY, 3 is an album born from fascination with the sweet and the sleazy, light and dark, danger and magic. Working with Dave Cobb (the producer behind Jason Isbell’s Southeastern and Sturgill Simpson’s Metamodern Sounds in Country Music), lead singer/banjo player/violinist Suzanne Santo and vocalist/guitarist Ben Jaffe twist their gritty, harmony-driven brand of Southern-flavored rock & roll through tales of lost souls, broken boys, girls with gold in their spit. Equal parts inward-looking and endlessly curious, the two songwriters also take a mirror to their own experience in lust and heartache and never shy away from revealing the messy truth. And whether they rattle or soothe or joyfully inspire, HONEYHONEY instill each song with a straight-from-the-gut honesty and elegance of storytelling that make both cathartic and electrifying.

For HONEYHONEY, the balance of sophistication and heart that the duo strikes onhas much to do with their closeness as songwriting collaborators. “Writing is about trust—trust in yourself and trust in your partner—and with us there’s a level of trust that you can only get from knowing someone for years and years,” says Jaffe. Forming the band in 2006, Santo and Jaffe first crossed paths at a costume party (she was a cheetah, he was Ralph Macchio in The Karate Kid), felt an instant creative connection, and soon started making music together. Although Jaffe learned to play violin and drums as a little kid in western Massachusetts and joined a local jazz band in high school, the Ohio-bred Santo initially pursued work in acting and didn’t think of music as a possible path until early adulthood. “I was new to L.A. and I’d just broken up with my first love,” she recalls. “I started writing these awful songs but I just kept going with it, and after a while it hit me that this was what I was supposed to do with my life.” Making their full-length debut with 2008’s First Rodeo, HONEYHONEY saw their sophomore album Billy Jack climb to #15 on Billboard’s Folk Albums chart and soon began earning praise from the likes of The Onion’s A.V. Club and LA Weekly.

Though Santo and Jaffe consider their continued growth as songwriters to be the lifeblood of the band, their live show also makes for a major element of the HONEYHONEY experience. “The reason we write songs is to express something real, and being able to engage with people directly the way we do onstage is a really important part of that,” Jaffe says. Fueled by their easy chemistry and between-song banter, the duo’s stage presence adds a whole new level of spirit and passion to their sound. “If there’s any kind of goal to what we’re doing, it’s to shake things up for the people listening,” says Santo. “Whether they need to dance or get happy or get angry or whatever, we can make that happen for them. We’ll make you cry and then make you laugh in under ten minutes.”

Oct
13
Tue
Modest Mouse @ War Memorial Auditorium
Oct 13 @ 7:00 PM – 11:00 PM

Modest Mouse will be at War Memorial Auditorium – October 13 through October 14, 2015

General Admission is Standing Room only. All seating in the Tier and Balcony is reserved seating for this event. Each seating area is separate from the other and moving between the two areas is not allowed.

Modest Mouse’s first new album in eight years, “Strangers to Ourselves” (Epic), debuted at #3 on the Billboard 200, and at #1 on the Rock, Alternative, Vinyl, and Internet charts the week it was released. The band also earned a career-high debut on the UK Official Albums chart.

“Strangers to Ourselves” has earned accolades in Entertainment Weekly, Rolling Stone, Time Magazine, NME, USA Today, and more. Modest Mouse was also the first band to perform for the launch of The Late Late Show with James Corden, when they performed “Be Brave.”

Recently, the band debuted their single “Lampshades on Fire” on The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon, played two sold-out shows at Webster Hall, and performed other new songs on CBS This Morning.

For more information, visit: Modest Mouse.com

Lightning 100 Presents Warren Haynes with Gill Landry @ Ryman Auditorium
Oct 13 @ 7:30 PM – 11:00 PM

Warren Haynes

with Gill Landry
Tuesday, October 13, 2015
7:30 PM
$45 & $37
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GRAMMY ® Award-winning artist, Warren Haynes is set to bring his rootsy/Americana soundscape back to Nashville on October 13 at historic Ryman Auditorium. In support of only the third studio album Haynes has ever released under his own name, Ashes and Dust, he puts fourth one of his most gorgeous, musically rich and personal albums to date. Throughout his prolific career as part of three of the greatest live groups in rock history – Allman Brothers Band, Gov’t Mule and the Dead – his virtuosic artistry has led to thousands of unforgettable performances.

Opening the show will be Gill Landry from Old Crow Medicine Show.

LIGHTNING 100 PRESENTS: Leon Bridges with Kali Uchis @ Marathon Music Works
Oct 13 @ 7:30 PM – 11:30 PM

LIGHTNING 100 PRESENTS:

Leon Bridges

Kali Uchis

TUE, OCTOBER 13, 2015

DOORS: 7:30 PM / SHOW: 8:30 PM

MARATHON MUSIC WORKS

NASHVILLE, TN

$22.00 – $25.00

ON SALE FRI 6/19 12:00 PM CDT

THIS EVENT IS 18 AND OVER

ABSOLUTELY NO REFUNDS – NO EXCEPTIONS. LINEUPS AND TIMES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE.
GOV’T ISSUED ID REQUIRED. NO RE-ENTRY.

Leon Bridges

Leon Bridges

The river of soul music flows on deep and strong, and 25-year-old Leon Bridges is immersed in its life-giving current. The Forth Worth, Texas native and Columbia Records artist is currently preparing his debut album for release in the summer of 2015. “I’m not saying I can hold a candle to any soul musician from the ’50s and ’60s,” Bridges says, “but I want to carry the torch.”Humility aside, Bridges’ light is burning bright. Following the October, 2014 release of two tunes that set the on-line world aflame, and accompanied by intimate solo shows from London to Los Angeles and Nashville to New York, the singer and songwriter has proved himself a rare talent who can do smoldering ballads and elemental rock’n’roll with equal aplomb. While he appears to have emerged cut from the cloth and fully formed, Bridges explains in his dulcet voice how he came to be here now.

“As a kid I grew fascinated with modern R&B. In high school I’d try singing songs by Ginuwine and Usher,” he explains, “and I thought well, maybe they weren’t in my range.” Instead, a lithe, nimble physicality led Leon to study dance at Tarrant County College in Fort Worth. “I’d been doing hip-hop dance since I was 11 years old,” he says. “I knew there was a dance program there, and I started diving into ballet and jazz and modern technique and learning choreography. I thought that’s what I wanted to do.”

Native inspiration soon diverted his path. “A friend of mine brought his keyboard to school every day, and we’d have these little jam sessions, improvising, and I started to find my voice.” One day a female friend asked Bridges to look after her guitar while she went to class. “I asked her to show me a couple chords first. And she did: A-minor and E-minor. I fell in love with their sound, and that’s when I started writing songs, from those two chords.”

That Bridges compositional bedrock began in a minor mode is revealing. At a moment when popular music seems in thrall to major chord sing-alongs, the blue hues of Bridges’ tunes embrace a subtlety that feels wholly refreshing. “Based on my innocence on guitar and my lack of knowledge of the technical side, my songwriting is something I have to make on-point with melody and delivery to make it shine,” he explains.

With a few early compositions tucked under his belt, a seeming dichotomy surfaced: Bridges’ tunes sounded less like the modern R&B he’d grown up loving than a style he was, in fact, not very familiar with: classic soul. Furthermore, Bridges’ sleek, fastidious fashion sensibility dovetailed with the songs he was writing. He began a tenderfoot period of apprenticeship playing coffeehouses in and around Fort Worth, slowly finding and refining his voice.

A turning point soon came via a pair of selvedge trousers. One night at an Austin bar Bridges was approached by a young woman who complimented him on his snazzy Wrangler’s and said that he should meet her boyfriend, a fellow with a comparable sense of style. Her boyfriend turned out to be Austin Jenkins of the band White Denim. “I hadn’t heard of White Denim at the time,” Bridges says, “but I went and looked them up and thought yeah, that’s interesting music.” After Jenkins and his bandmate Joshua Block subsequently peeped Bridges perform at a low-key local show, they insisted Leon enter the studio to cut a few tracks on their burgeoning bank of vintage equipment.

That initial three-day session, with Jenkins and Block producing, yielded the recordings that set Bridges at the center of rapturous attention from aficionados and labels alike. The buttery, seductive “Coming Home” and the piston-driven, doo-wop flavored “Better Man” demonstrated Bridges’ versatility. Inking with Columbia Records, whose roster includes a certain hero named Bob Dylan, was the outcome of courtship and deliberation. “Columbia has artists I look up to like Adele and Pharrell, as well as Raphael Saadiq and John Legend,” says Bridges. “They way they value artistry makes it feel like home.”

The early 2015 release of another new song, “Lisa Sawyer,” has further burnished Bridges’ promise. With its brushed snares and glowing brass, “Lisa Sawyer” is a remarkably assured offering from so young a talent. The song, about Bridges’ mother, a woman “with the complexion of a sweet praline,” has the flavor of one of Allen Toussaint’s productions for the great Lee Dorsey. Connecting the sacred and the secular, “Lisa Sawyer” feels natural considering Bridges’ churchgoing childhood. And by writing with specificity about his own family, Bridges is creating resonant work about the African-American experience.

“I have a lot of insecurities because I don’t have a big powerhouse voice,” he admits. “I’m not a shouter. I rely on phrasing to get my feeling across.” Bridges’ delivery exudes strength through tenderness. “I guess that’s why I connected with Sam Cooke.”

The name Sam Cooke has appeared frequently in Bridges’ early notices in the press. The point of comparison is apt, but not initially intentional. “When I wrote ‘Lisa Sawyer’ I didn’t know anything about old soul music,” Leon says. “I was asked ‘Is Sam Cooke one of your inspirations?’ I had to say no, because I only knew Sam Cooke’s ‘A Change Is Gonna Come’ from the movie Malcolm X, which I’d watched with my father. But from being asked about Sam Cooke and Otis Redding I started digging deeper into soul music from the ’50 and ’60s and realizing this is really the root of what I’m doing.”

What to make of the fact that Bridges is working in a tradition whose existence he was initially only vaguely aware of? “It speaks to the gift God placed in me,” Leon says, choosing his words carefully. “It humbles and wows me to think I was pulling from something I didn’t really know about.”

In the striking black-and-white images that have accompanied Leon’s emergence, one photograph stands out. It depicts Bridges sauntering down a sunlit sidewalk, his shadow falling not behind him but stretching out in the direction of his forward stride. The implication is that Bridges is not walking away from the past, but moving forward with both family history and the tradition of soul music in full view. His ancestors and antecedents walk with him. “They’re with me at all times,” affirms Bridges. Steeped in tradition, drenched with intention and desire, Leon Bridges’ soul music is happening here and now.

Kali Uchis

Kali Uchis

The Colombian born and Virginia raised singer released her first studio-recorded EP, Por Vida, on February 3rd this year and has collaborated with artists/producers including Tyler The Creator, Snoop Dogg, Diplo, and Rick Rubin. Her first studio release has already garnered praise from the likes of Billboard, Pitchfork, Noisey, and The Fader (see links below). With a sound that mirrors Amy Winehouse and 60s soul, Kali makes the old sound new again with a funky twist. She is on the way to becoming a household name.
Oct
14
Wed
Modest Mouse @ War Memorial Auditorium
Oct 14 @ 7:00 PM – 11:00 PM

Modest Mouse will be at War Memorial Auditorium – October 13 through October 14, 2015

General Admission is Standing Room only. All seating in the Tier and Balcony is reserved seating for this event. Each seating area is separate from the other and moving between the two areas is not allowed.

Modest Mouse’s first new album in eight years, “Strangers to Ourselves” (Epic), debuted at #3 on the Billboard 200, and at #1 on the Rock, Alternative, Vinyl, and Internet charts the week it was released. The band also earned a career-high debut on the UK Official Albums chart.

“Strangers to Ourselves” has earned accolades in Entertainment Weekly, Rolling Stone, Time Magazine, NME, USA Today, and more. Modest Mouse was also the first band to perform for the launch of The Late Late Show with James Corden, when they performed “Be Brave.”

Recently, the band debuted their single “Lampshades on Fire” on The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon, played two sold-out shows at Webster Hall, and performed other new songs on CBS This Morning.

For more information, visit: Modest Mouse.com

Patty Griffin with Darlingside @ Ryman Auditorium
Oct 14 @ 7:30 PM – 11:00 PM

Patty Griffin

with Darlingside
Wednesday, October 14, 2015
7:30 PM
$45.50, $39.50 & $32.50
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Click here to enter to win a limited edition Hatch Show Print.

Patty Griffin is a Grammy-Award winning artist who has achieved great acclaim for her songwriting as well as her powerful voice. Her first two albums, Living With Ghosts and Flaming Red are considered seminal albums in the singer-songwriter genre, while Children Running Though won Best Album and led to her being named Best Artist at the 2007 Americana Music Awards. She won the Grammy for Downtown Church, her 2010 gospel album. Her songs have been covered by a myriad of artists including Emmylou Harris, The Dixie Chicks, Joan Baez and Bette Midler. She was born in Old Town, Maine and resides in Austin, Texas.

Lightning 100 Presents: Waxahatchee with Weyes Blood and Try The Pie @ Exit/In
Oct 14 @ 8:00 PM – 11:45 PM
Waxahatchee

Waxahatchee

Katie Crutchfield’s southern roots are undeniable. The name of her solo musical project Waxahatchee comes from a creek not far from her childhood home in Alabama and seems to represent both where she came from and where she’s going. Since leaving home, Crutchfield has drifted between New York and Philadelphia but chose to return to Alabama to write her first two albums: American Weekend, her debut filled with powerful lo-fi acoustic tracks full of lament, and Cerulean Salt, a more developed and solid narrative about growing up. Both are representations of a youthful struggle with unresolved issues and unrequited feelings.

Waxhatchee’s latest record, Ivy Tripp, drifts confidently from these previous albums and brings forth a more informed and powerful recognition of where Crutchfield has currently found herself. The lament and grieving for her youth seem to have been replaced with control and sheer self-honesty. “My life has changed a lot in the last two years, and it’s been hard for me to process my feelings other than by writing songs,” says Crutchfield. “I think a running theme [of Ivy Tripp] is steadying yourself on shaky ground and reminding yourself that you have control in situations that seem overwhelming, or just being cognizant in moments of deep confusion or sadness, and learning to really feel emotions and to grow from that.”

Recorded and engineered by Kyle Gilbride of Wherever Audio at Crutchfield’s home on New York’s Long Island—with drums recorded in the gym of a local elementary school—Ivy Tripp presents a more developed and aged version of Waxahatchee. “The title Ivy Tripp is really just a term I made up for directionless-ness, specifically of the 20-something, 30-something, 40-something of today, lacking regard for the complaisant life path of our parents and grandparents. I have thought of it like this: Cerulean Salt is a solid and Ivy Tripp is a gas.”

Crutchfield is accompanied by both Gilbride and Keith Spencer on Ivy Tripp, and the record was produced by all three of them. With the addition of more guitar work, piano, drum machines, and Crutchfield’s vocals in full bloom, we are given a record that feels more emphatic and pronounced. Ivy Tripp opens with “Breathless,” filled with only a distorted keyboard and layers of vocals, showcasing Waxahatchee’s pension for quiet, personal reflection. The record then opens up into “Under a Rock,” a quicker guitar-driven song that lays the foundation for the rest of the album, which as a whole resonates with strong, self-aware lyrics, energetic ballads, and powerfully hushed moments of solitude. Crutchfield’s voice is certainly the guiding force behind Ivy Tripp—commanding and voluminous in the rock song “Poison,” candied and pure in the frolicking “La Loose”—gripping you tightly and then softly releasing you into the wilds of emotion.

As far as her goals with Ivy Tripp, Crutchfield says, “I heard someone say that you have to be the change you want to see. I just want to be the kind of musician I want to see in the world. I want to present myself in a way that reflects that.”

Weyes Blood

Weyes Blood

There exists a terrifying film called The Innocents, starring Deborah Kerr, released in 1961. It’s based on a play of the same name, which in turn was an adaptation of Henry James’ novella The Turn Of The Screw. All versions involve a governess hired to care for two young children, who may or may not be possessed by the ghosts of the couple who looked after them in the past, a couple whose deviant nature destroyed the lives around them (including their own).

Those who’ve had occasion to watch the film version haven’t easily forgotten the opening credits: as you sit in complete darkness (or some reasonable facsimile thereof … c’mon, work with us), and well before the studio logo is displayed, you hear a little girl’s voice, unaccompanied, singing these words:

We lay, my love and I, beneath the weeping willow.

But now alone I lie and weep beside the tree.

Singing “O Willow Waly” by the tree that weeps with me.

Singing “O Willow Waly” till my lover return to me.

We lay, my love and I, beneath the weeping willow.

A broken heart have I.

O willow, I die…

O willow, I die.

The film’s credits roll on, screen right, as the image of Ms. Kerr, praying and sobbing, is superimposed on the left. That sequence puts you on the back foot and keeps you there, even as you begin to doubt the events of the story that follows, lingering on like mist, heavy and earthbound.

Henry James would’ve wanted it that way. Tired of the ways in which authors had depicted the supernatural, the author extrapolated their evil nature out of elements you’d never expect, or in his own words, “the strange and sinister embroidered on … the normal and easy.” And his notions of how to represent these tropes have since fed into our familiar understanding of how suspense works as a narrative device in the centuries that followed. James made us all more suspicious; where we find beauty and sadness, we often assume that it has been influenced by some spectre whose bent will keeps its presence lingering from beyond the grave, whose sorrows have curdled into vengeance. We walk alone in wintery woods, past the frozen lake, wind whipping through the bare branches, and we cannot help but wonder if we are truly alone, if there is any creature that could take us down with it every time we hear the dead leaves rustle or the snapping of a dried branch, or if it’s all in our minds.

The Innocents is the name of the second album by Natalie Mering, who performs as Weyes Blood. Its ten songs confront us with their truths. There is the beauty of Ms. Mering’s voice, whose strength across two vocal registers reveals a vulnerability belied by some of her lyrics. On all but one of the songs on The Innocents, her voice is the dominant quality, tracked in multi-part harmonies with herself. There is the semblance of training in her voice to get her to where she can sing today, or any number of devices we as listeners impose upon her, because most of us are not privy to a vocalist of such rare choral purity.

Then there is the truth of the words she sings on The Innocents, words so clear that they cannot be misinterpreted. It’s not unintentional that Weyes Blood is a colloquialism referring to Flannery O’Connor, though Mering doesn’t mince for words. Forget similes and metaphors: when you are confronted with lyrics like those found on “Some Winters” (“I’m as broken/as a woman can be” … “Go on, leave me for the last time”), lyrics that are so emotionally unflinching that they could pierce stone, the notion of any other interpretations seem trivial. And yet, you will try. As you sift through her words, you’ll feel something, and you’ll associate those feeling with past experiences that may cause you to associate them with something more, something that affects your own emotional state.

Finally, there is the truth of the music. Rooted in American and British folk, Weyes Blood pulls and stretches the style at its fringes, like a sweater that’s just begun to unravel. Traditional instruments (guitar, piano, drums) are set against electronics and tape effects, collages and the melodic qualities of delay, that bridge an older world of songcraft into the future, creating a synthesis between all the best of the 20th century and those that came before. A song like the melancholy ballad “Bad Magic” possesses infinite beauty in its sadness and how it releases those sentiments, but it’s even more beautiful in relief to all the other material on The Innocents. Never once does she repeat herself. Each song is a variant on the styles present in the record, and each is unmistakably her own.

Not dissimilar to the work of Henry James, Weyes Blood presents a series of musical interludes, free for you to interpret but poised to elicit a raw emotional response. Does her music sound haunted to you, then, because it evokes memories that trigger our own fears, or do you honestly believe that there is a ghost dictating her every turn? As Mering stated in a recent interview, her work’s “creepiness … is only as intentional as you think it is.” To her, this is the only form of expression: laid bare, deeply connected to the past, and miles away from anything else you’re likely to hear in music today.

Try The Pie
Oct
16
Fri
Walk The Moon With HOLYCHILD (SOLD OUT) @ Ryman Auditorium
Oct 16 @ 7:00 PM

“We’re venturing into unmarked regions of the map with these songs,” says guitarist Eli Maiman, “but we’re leaving breadcrumbs along the way so people can follow us.”

WALK THE MOON’s new album, ‘TALKING IS HARD’, is a bold statement from the band known for their blissful, quirky brand of rock and roll.   Fueled by years on the road and now emerging from months in the studio, WALK THE MOON are clearly unafraid to bear their hearts and their ambition.

Formed in Cincinnati by singer/keyboardist Nicholas Petricca, WALK THE MOON built up a devoted following on the strength of their ecstatic live show and their undeniably infectious single “Anna Sun.”  A relentless touring machine with an ever-snowballing family of fans, the band quickly graduated from Ohio club scene favorites to an international force to be reckoned with. They hit the late-night TV circuit with performances on Letterman, Fallon, Conan, and Carson, played for massive crowds at Bonnaroo and Lollapalooza, and joined the likes of fun., Pink, Panic! At The Disco, and Fitz and the Tantrums on the road in the US, UK, and Europe.

In concert, it’s clear that WALK THE MOON’s live show is not a spectator sport.  Instead, it’s an interactive celebration of life and love, a communal commitment to joy and living in the moment. Onstage, Petricca leads audiences in a mass exorcism of the things that bring them down, casting out the demons of doubt and insecurity with hands raised to the sky.

But when the band finished touring in support of their self-titled 2012 RCA debut, Petricca found something entirely new on his hands: time.

“We went from three years of constant movement on the road to having six weeks where we could set everything else aside and focus strictly on writing,” he explains.

The band holed up in a repurposed Masonic Lodge in Dayton, KY, which housed graffiti artists, screen printers, and photography, not to mention secret rooms, ghosts, and taxidermy.

“It was like an art-commune-rock-and-roll-b&b,” says drummer Sean Waugaman. “There were old artifacts the Masons left behind.  The place looked like something out of ‘Eyes Wide Shut.'”

Setting up directly beneath a massive spotlight that had once shone down on a ceremonial altar, WALK THE MOON launched into writing an entire album from scratch for the very first time as a band.  Clocking in 14-hour days for weeks on end, the band pushed themselves beyond any previous creative limits with an audacious sense of abandon.

“We’d never had an opportunity like this before,” bassist Kevin Ray points out.  “We were able to live and work in a really creative space – just the four of us.”

After six weeks of these marathon writing sessions, the band relocated to North Hollywood, where they entered the studio with producer Tim Pagnotta (Neon Trees, Tokyo Police Club).  What followed was more than two solid months of recording, the band eager to reach new heights with the album’s production.

“The drive to do something special was so intense that we actually started a song at 6pm our last day of tracking,” remembers Maiman. “We ended up working through the night because everyone felt like what we were doing was so important.  We didn’t leave the studio until after the sun came up.”

The results speak for themselves.  Lead single “Shut Up And Dance” is an undeniable pop-rock anthem.  An ode to freeing yourself from the shackles of self-consciousness and embracing the present, it’s already a live favorite, with a sing-along chorus that works audiences up into a frenzy.

But, as the band warns, listeners who delve deeper into ‘TALKING IS HARD’ will find themselves in wild, uncharted territory.  Raw vocal performances, heavy rock riffs, new wave quirks, and stylish percussion make for a futuristic marriage with lyrical themes of self-empowerment, growth, and survival.  “Work This Body” howls defiantly for physical and mental relentlessness with Mercury-like flamboyance, while “Down In The Dumps” shouts “tough love!” in the face of depression on a careening robot-rock runaway train.  Meanwhile, in a hushed voice, “Aquaman” tenderly tells the story of a reluctant, victorious romance.  Finally, on “Up 2 U,” perhaps the band’s most adventurous – and ferocious – song to date, Petricca examines a non-romantic relationship:  ours with the planet.

“What we’ve ended up with is a bunch of really committed, confident shouts into the darkness,” says Petricca.

As they return to the road, WALK THE MOON is finding that the darkness is full of eager fans and soon-to-be-converts, all shouting back, singing along until the lights come up.

VINTAGE TROUBLE @ Cannery Ballroom
Oct 16 @ 9:00 PM – 11:45 PM

 

Vintage Trouble

Vintage Trouble
(Pop)

Over the past few years, Vintage Trouble have wowed audiences across the globe by opening for The Rolling Stones in London’s Hyde Park, touring with legends like The Who and AC/DC, and playing sold-out headline shows worldwide. Now, on their first album for Blue Note Records, the Los Angeles- based foursome — singer Ty Taylor, guitarist Nalle Colt, bassist Rick Barrio Dill, and drummer Richard Danielson — channel the vitality and passion of their live show into a fresh and urgent take on guitar-powered rhythm & blues. Produced by Blue Note president and three-time Grammy Award-winner Don Was, 1 Hopeful Rd. finds Vintage Trouble building off the groove-fueled sound that Yahoo! once painted as “James Brown singing lead for Led Zeppelin” and blending blues, soul, and riff-heavy rock & roll with joyfully gritty abandon. As heard on lead single “Run Like the River,” 1 Hopeful Rd. matches Vintage Trouble’s emotional intensity with a raw yet sophisticated musicianship that’s prompted the New York Times to name the band modern-day answer to Otis Redding and BBC Radio 6 to anoint them “the heirs of rhythm and blues.”

Oct
17
Sat
@ Centiennial Park
Oct 17 all-day

Blue Water Music is pleased to welcome The Flaming Lips, Allen Stone and The Weeks to SoundHarvest Music Festival, a music and arts event to take place on the Parthenon Lawn at Centennial Park on Saturday, October 17th. VIP and GA tickets available now, click here!
SoundHarvest Music Fest : The Flaming Lips, Allen Stone, and The Weeks @ Centennial Park
Oct 17 all-day

SoundHarvest Music Festival Welcomes Allen Stone & The Weeks to Lineup 

Bluewater Music creates festival to celebrate the city’s diverse musical taste at 

Centennial Park on October 17

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – August 5, 2015 – Bluewater Music is pleased to welcome Allen Stone and The Weeks to SoundHarvest Music Festival, a music and arts event to take place on the Parthenon Lawn at Centennial Park on Saturday, October 17. Doors for this all-ages event will open at 11 a.m., with nonstop music on two stages until 11 p.m..

 

Allen Stone has released three full-length records, the most recent being Radius, an uncompromisingly soulful album that transcends all pop convention, of which NPR’s Ann Powers says is, “meant for those of us who like our R&B slightly unkempt and exceedingly feelingful”. The 28-year old from Chewelah, Washington effortlessly blends edgy soul-pop and earthy folk-rock with throwback R&B and Parliament-inspired funk.

 

Hailing from Florence, MS, The Weeks have staked a claim as heirs to the timeless tradition of Southern rock. In 2013 the band released the critically acclaimed record,

Dear Bo Jackson, on Kings of Leon’s label, Serpents and Snakes Records. Since the 2013 release, they’ve been touring non-stop, notably joining Kings of Leon on a UK/European arena tour and playing key festivals including Voodoo Music + Arts Experience and Austin City Limits. The band is currently in the studio preparing for a new record.

 

Festival Director, Monica Copciac, says of the event, “We noticed the changing music scene in Nashville and realized the city didn’t have a unique festival focused around rock and pop. Thus, SoundHarvest was born.” The Flaming Lips are confirmed as the headliner, with more great bands to be announced in the coming weeks. Soundharvest is also committed to showcasing Nashville’s best by featuring local bands on both stages, as well as a vendor area with Nashville restaurants and artisans.

 

“SoundHarvest Music Festival is a great addition to our live music scene, and I welcome them to Nashville,” Mayor Karl Dean said. “I always say you can never have too much live music in Music City, and it’s always great to see a diversity of genres represented. I know that festival goers will enjoy themselves in our beautiful Centennial Park.”

 

SoundHarvest is sponsored in part by Lighting 100, Musician’s Corner, Sarah and David Ingram, Ticketfly, D&D Events, The Nashville Scene and Do615. Thistle Farms and

The Cumberland River Compact will be onsite as part of SoundHarvest’s local non-profit spotlight.

 

Tickets are $45 in advance and $55 at the door and are available for purchase now via Ticketfly or  www.soundharvest.com. There will also be a limited number of $100 advance /$150 door VIP tickets available that include a private viewing area with catering, exclusive bar, and private restrooms.

 

Bluewater Music, founded in 1985 by Brownlee Ferguson, is a premiere independent music publisher, copyright administrator, and artist management firm located in Nashville, TN that prides itself on adding value to the songwriters and publishers they represent.
Visit www.soundharvest.com and follow SoundHarvest on Facebook for more information and lineup additions.

 

Walk The Moon With HOLYCHILD @ Ryman Auditorium
Oct 17 @ 7:00 PM

“We’re venturing into unmarked regions of the map with these songs,” says guitarist Eli Maiman, “but we’re leaving breadcrumbs along the way so people can follow us.”

WALK THE MOON’s new album, ‘TALKING IS HARD’, is a bold statement from the band known for their blissful, quirky brand of rock and roll.   Fueled by years on the road and now emerging from months in the studio, WALK THE MOON are clearly unafraid to bear their hearts and their ambition.

Formed in Cincinnati by singer/keyboardist Nicholas Petricca, WALK THE MOON built up a devoted following on the strength of their ecstatic live show and their undeniably infectious single “Anna Sun.”  A relentless touring machine with an ever-snowballing family of fans, the band quickly graduated from Ohio club scene favorites to an international force to be reckoned with. They hit the late-night TV circuit with performances on Letterman, Fallon, Conan, and Carson, played for massive crowds at Bonnaroo and Lollapalooza, and joined the likes of fun., Pink, Panic! At The Disco, and Fitz and the Tantrums on the road in the US, UK, and Europe.

In concert, it’s clear that WALK THE MOON’s live show is not a spectator sport.  Instead, it’s an interactive celebration of life and love, a communal commitment to joy and living in the moment. Onstage, Petricca leads audiences in a mass exorcism of the things that bring them down, casting out the demons of doubt and insecurity with hands raised to the sky.

But when the band finished touring in support of their self-titled 2012 RCA debut, Petricca found something entirely new on his hands: time.

“We went from three years of constant movement on the road to having six weeks where we could set everything else aside and focus strictly on writing,” he explains.

The band holed up in a repurposed Masonic Lodge in Dayton, KY, which housed graffiti artists, screen printers, and photography, not to mention secret rooms, ghosts, and taxidermy.

“It was like an art-commune-rock-and-roll-b&b,” says drummer Sean Waugaman. “There were old artifacts the Masons left behind.  The place looked like something out of ‘Eyes Wide Shut.'”

Setting up directly beneath a massive spotlight that had once shone down on a ceremonial altar, WALK THE MOON launched into writing an entire album from scratch for the very first time as a band.  Clocking in 14-hour days for weeks on end, the band pushed themselves beyond any previous creative limits with an audacious sense of abandon.

“We’d never had an opportunity like this before,” bassist Kevin Ray points out.  “We were able to live and work in a really creative space – just the four of us.”

After six weeks of these marathon writing sessions, the band relocated to North Hollywood, where they entered the studio with producer Tim Pagnotta (Neon Trees, Tokyo Police Club).  What followed was more than two solid months of recording, the band eager to reach new heights with the album’s production.

“The drive to do something special was so intense that we actually started a song at 6pm our last day of tracking,” remembers Maiman. “We ended up working through the night because everyone felt like what we were doing was so important.  We didn’t leave the studio until after the sun came up.”

The results speak for themselves.  Lead single “Shut Up And Dance” is an undeniable pop-rock anthem.  An ode to freeing yourself from the shackles of self-consciousness and embracing the present, it’s already a live favorite, with a sing-along chorus that works audiences up into a frenzy.

But, as the band warns, listeners who delve deeper into ‘TALKING IS HARD’ will find themselves in wild, uncharted territory.  Raw vocal performances, heavy rock riffs, new wave quirks, and stylish percussion make for a futuristic marriage with lyrical themes of self-empowerment, growth, and survival.  “Work This Body” howls defiantly for physical and mental relentlessness with Mercury-like flamboyance, while “Down In The Dumps” shouts “tough love!” in the face of depression on a careening robot-rock runaway train.  Meanwhile, in a hushed voice, “Aquaman” tenderly tells the story of a reluctant, victorious romance.  Finally, on “Up 2 U,” perhaps the band’s most adventurous – and ferocious – song to date, Petricca examines a non-romantic relationship:  ours with the planet.

“What we’ve ended up with is a bunch of really committed, confident shouts into the darkness,” says Petricca.

As they return to the road, WALK THE MOON is finding that the darkness is full of eager fans and soon-to-be-converts, all shouting back, singing along until the lights come up.

Oct
18
Sun
Musicians Corner : Band of Heathens, The Suffers, Sarah Potenza, Centennial jamBands @ Centennial Park
Oct 18 all-day

Our Fall 2015 Season takes place September 5 to October 31.

Musicians Corner, a program of The Conservancy for the Parthenon and Centennial Park, presents free weekly lawn parties in Nashville’s Centennial Park on Saturday afternoons in May, June, September and October.

Follow us on Twitter: @muscornernash
Follow us on Instagram: /MusCornerNash
Learn more and get performance schedules at www.musicianscornernashville.com

Musicians Corner is a program of The Conservancy for the Parthenon and Centennial Park, a 5019c)(3) nonprofit organization.

Lightning 100 Presents Blizten Trapper @ Exit/In
Oct 18 @ 8:00 PM

Lightning 100 Presents:

Blitzen Trapper

SUN, OCTOBER 18, 2015

DOORS: 8:00 PM / SHOW: 9:00 PM

EXIT/IN

NASHVILLE, TN

$18.00 – $20.00

THIS EVENT IS 18 AND OVER

Absolutely no refunds – no exceptions. Lineups and times are subject to change.
Gov’t issued ID required. No re-entry.

Blitzen Trapper

Blitzen Trapper

Over the course of 15 years and seven full-length albums, Blitzen Trapper has crafted one of the more compelling and varied catalogs in contemporary rock and roll. Indeed, singer and guitarist Eric Earley, who is also the Portland, Oregon-based band’s primary songwriter, is possessed of a musical and lyrical sensibility that is remarkably deep and wide; big ideas and universal emotions are wrung from the seemingly plainspoken details of small-screen and often highly personal stories, and set to music that reaches way, way back to old-timey folk and bluegrass, travels through everything from country, psychedelia and soul to prog, garage and metal, indulges gloriously in the classic rock of the 70s and 80s, and makes occasional side trips into hip-hop, skewed pop and noisey freakouts.
Even while continuing to explore broad stylistic territory, Blitzen Trapper’s eighth studio album, a 10-song collection titled All Across This Land, stands as an exceptionally focused and immediate effort. Though it follows 2013’s somewhat experimental VII, a futuristic hip-hop/country-rock hybrid, All Across This Land, in contrast, is a top-down, tightly defined piece of classic rock and roll, full of big riffs, bigger hooks and compelling, instantly relatable lyrics. In sound and scope it recalls two of the band’s more beloved albums, 2008’s breakthrough fourth effort, Furr, and 2011’s landmark American Goldwing. “I think it’s a return to the sort of more ‘classic’ Blitzen Trapper thing, for sure,” Earley says.
It also follows something of a pattern. “It seems to be that every other album goes this way,” Earley continues. “After Furr we did [2010’s] Destroyer of the Void, where we were exploring all these different things. Then came American Goldwing. After that, VII. Now we’re back to that rock thing again.”
Something else All Across This Land shares with Furr and American Goldwing: the fact that these new songs came quick, and in a very concentrated period of time. “Those two albums, I wrote all the songs at once and they all hang together. But the records that came in between, they were written over the course of a year-and-a-half or so,” Earley says. For All Across This Land, he continues, “I had all the songs written and demoed in a three or four month span. And I think they work together because everything came in such a short period.”
And yet, for a record characterized by its focus, there is still plenty of musical and lyrical ground covered within its ten songs. Gentle, almost folksy moments–the lilting, pedal steel-inflected “Love Grow Cold”; the fingerpicked closer “Across the River”; the acoustic-guitar-and-harmonica-led “Lonesome Angel”–abound, even if, for the most part, All Across This Land is defined by its more upbeat rock-and-roll numbers. To that end, Earley says it’s the record that perhaps best represents what Blitzen Trapper is as a live act. “It’s funny, because I think with this band, there’s two different ways people see us,” he says. “People who just hear the music somewhere, they tend to think of us as this, like, indie-folk act. But people who come to the shows know that we’re actually a hard rock band. And who knows? Maybe all that some people really want from us is folk music. But what we like to do is play rock music.”
On All Across This Land, they certainly do. The album kicks off with “All Across This Land,” a slice of sun-drenched rock propelled by a stabbing and syncopated guitar riff and full-voiced chords, accented by some euphoric “hoo hoo” backing vocals. When Earley’s vocal enters, it’s with a greeting of sorts: “Welcome to earth my son you’re here just in time / So much to learn so many ways you can shine.” The song is, at its core, a celebration of life, in particular of one that is just beginning. “One of the members of our band, Mike [Van Pelt] had just had his second boy, and I was thinking a lot about that,” Earley says. From there, he also began to look back on his relationship with his own father, a bluegrass and folk musician. “I was remembering how my father taught me to play music, There’s just so much potential in that relationship you have with a new life.”
From here, the record moves into “Rock and Roll Was Made for You,” another celebration of sorts, this one for music itself. Over a driving, percussive guitar riff, Earley testifies about its sometimes otherworldly powers: “Rock and roll gonna make you shout / It’s for shooting down planes after blacking out.”
Music also serves as the inspiration behind the record’s third track, the pulsing and atmospheric “Mystery and Wonder.” “In a lot of ways this one is me reminiscing about the songs I’ve written in the past and my reasons for writing them,” Earley says. “And it also looks at how we got into playing music as a band. Because we all came from much smaller places and then we moved to the city, which was Portland. Now, Portland isn’t really that big a place, but to us it was. And that’s where it all started.” Another cut, “Nights Were Made For Love” finds Earley examining his life and band from a more nostalgic perspective. Over a quick-paced but laidback country-rock rhythm, he sings about being “stupid, strange and young at heart / and all we wanted was to rock and roll.” “It’s looking back at our high school days–going to football games, playing music,” he says. “In certain ways, it’s sort of the story of the journey of our band.”
Earley’s childhood comes into play in a much different way on the dark and driving “Cadillac Road.” “That song is about a small mill town in the mountains outside of where we all grew up,” the singer explains. “Around ’83 or ’84, they shut down the mill and everyone was told to pack up and leave. And everyone did–but one guy stayed. People said he lived in the woods, and that if you listened you could hear him at night. It was this odd story that stuck with me, and I felt like I should tell that story.” But in telling the tale of one man, Earley manages to touch on much larger themes of loss, regret and perseverance in the face of a shifting American landscape. “Gotta change with the times,” he sings at one point, “but I dont have the heart.”
The album ends with another big statement, “Across the River,” a rumination on life and death that Earley sees as something of a bookend to opener “All Across This Land.” “I feel like they tie in together, because the first song is about new life, and the last one is almost a near-death experience,” he says. “I’m crossing a river to another place that’s something like the afterlife–it’s heaven, but it’s not. And then my father shows up and he says, ‘You’re not supposed to be here yet. You’ve got more stuff to do.’ ”
Earley’s father comes up often in the context of his lyrics, which is understandable–the elder Earley has cast a long shadow over his son’s musical life. “My dad and my grandfather both played instruments–guitars, banjos…my grandfather was a harmonica virtuoso,” Earley says. “So there was a lot of music around me as a child. And it was old-timey stuff. Like mountain music–the kinds of songs where no one knows who wrote them, basically.”
Earley’s childhood was so rooted in this music that he didn’t get turned on to rock and roll until much later, when he was already in high school. “So to me,” he says, “the 80s is kind of my foundation for rock. A lot of my influence is from the Replacements, R.E.M., that kind of stuff. Even Pavement in the early 90s.” As a result, on All Across This Land, “when I’m thinking of rock and roll, I’m thinking of Paul Westerberg, to be honest,” Earley admits with a laugh. In addition to Westerberg, he also cites Joe Walsh as one of his main rock influences: “He’s always been one of my favorite guitar players, and you can hear it on the album. The riffs and chords on ‘All Across This Land,’ that’s straight from Joe Walsh.”
That love of a particular type of rock and roll helped guide Blitzen Trapper’s approach on All Across This Land. “We recorded it specifically to be a two guitar, bass, drums and piano record,” Earley says. “Every song is a band song, and arranged just how we’d play it onstage. Because at this point, we’ve made tons of records and we’ve played tons of shows. And the people who come out to see us, they understand what we’re doing and they don’t care about genres or anything like that. They’re more interested in our actual specific unique personality as a band.”
As for what that specific personality is? “I think there’s two kinds of songs I love to write,” Earley says. “I love songs that rock hard and that just make you feel good, and then I love songs that are sad and introspective and touch you in a very deep place.”
Which, in essence, is exactly what Blitzen Trapper puts forth on All Across This Land. “I was trying to distill everything down to those two things,” Earley explains. And if, in doing so, the band happens to pick up a host of different sounds and styles along the way, so be it. “We’re never going to be a band that plays the same song over and over again,” he says. “We like to explore. And sometimes that’s not so easy for people to deal with. But we’re going to just keep on doing what we do.”
Nashville Sunday Night Presents: The Black Lillies @ 3rd and Lindsley
Oct 18 @ 8:00 PM – 10:00 PM

Artist

“The Black Lillies are fronted by the best-matched male-female vocal duo since Gram Parsons and Emmylou Harris,” says News OK. It sounds like an overstatement – unless you’ve heard the Black Lillies. Then it sounds like a reasonable claim.

The Black Lillies are a band for the ages, not the slick, soulless music that seems to get most of the radio airplay, but rich, rootsy tunes performed with as much heart as technical virtuosity. This commitment to authenticity has earned them accolades from outlets as diverse as Rolling Stone Magazine, who calls them one of “the most buzzworthy new acts in country and Americana,” and the Wall Street Journal, who praised their “rootsy flair … a winsome hybrid traditional enough to appeal to an Opry crowd and expansive enough to ensnare a broader audience.”

Their third and latest album, Runaway Freeway Blues, is a beautiful ode to restless spirits and rambling hearts – rooted in the mud-rutted switchbacks of Appalachia; it is the sound of a band that’s becoming something of a phenomenon across the country. That album conquered the Billboard Top 200 country charts and dominated Americana radio, spending three months in the top 5 on the radio charts and claiming the #18 spot on the Americana Music Association’s Top 100 Albums of 2013 (based on radio airplay). It was selected for dozens of Best of 2013 lists and caught the attention of NPR, CMT, Vanity Fair, American Songwriter, Guitar World, Garden & Gun and more for whatEntertainment Weekly calls “strong roots-folk songwriting, sweet harmonies, and charismatic indie spirit.”

They’ve enthralled audiences at festivals ranging from Bonnaroo and South by Southwest to CMA Fan Fair and Stagecoach, won two Independent Music Awards, and played the Grand Ole Opry more than any other independent band.

The music is breakneck, brazen and beautiful; gentle Laurel Canyon folk, the honky-tonk heartache of classic country, winding jams and flat-out rock’n’roll … but full of the spirit of the open road, heading down the highway and not about to stop anytime soon!

Oct
23
Fri
Lightning 100 Presents Jason Isbell with special guest Amanda Shires @ Ryman Auditorium
Oct 23 @ 7:00 PM – 11:00 PM

jasonisbell_lg_0

Jason Isbell

with special guest Amanda Shires
Friday, October 23, 2015
8:00 PM
$35
On sale Friday, April 24 at 10 AM
Share page with AddThis
Click here to enter to win a limited edition Hatch Show Print.

Tickets will be available online ONLY.


Acclaimed, award-winning artist Jason Isbell will release Something More Than Free, his highly anticipated fifth album, on July 17 via Southeastern Records. Something More Than Free features Isbell’s Southern-inspired vignettes of working class men, women and traditions that permeate these 11 new songs. The pure honesty and authenticity of Isbell’s poetic lyrics and soulful vocals have connected deeply with so many, and they shine as brightly as ever on Something More Than Free.

Something More Than Free is Isbell’s most sonically diverse album to date. The opening track, “If It Takes A Lifetime” exudes a classic country tone, while “24 Frames” flows effortlessly with its easy, Laurel Canyon vibe. The wistful folk balladry of “Flagship”, along with the bluesy Southern rock timbre of “Palmetto Rose” and epic “Children Of Children” prove that Jason Isbell is an artist whose creative pinnacle has yet to be within sight.

Something More Than Free is the follow up to Isbell’s 2013 celebrated breakthrough album Southeastern, which received overwhelming support from the press and went on to sell over 150,000 copies. Isbell was subject of stories in outlets ranging from The New York Times Magazine and Wall Street Journal to NPR’s All Things Considered and Fresh Air with Terry Gross. Jason Isbell & The 400 Unit made multiple television appearances, including The Late Show with David Letterman, Conan and Austin City Limits. Isbell won Artist of the Year, Song of the Year (“Cover Me Up”) and Album of the Year at the 2014 Americana Music Awards. Catch Jason and his wife Amanda Shires during a very special performance on The Late Show with David Letterman on April 24.

Along with the media support, the success of Southeastern was the product of good old-fashioned hard work. Much like the working class subjects in his songs, Isbell grinded it out with his band The 400 Unit on the road. They toured extensively, made real connections with his audience, poured his heart out each night and stayed true to his convictions. Audiences grew as venue sizes expanded with sold out shows throughout the U.S. and Europe, including New York’s Beacon Theatre and three sold out nights at Nashville’s historic Ryman Auditorium, where an unprecedented four-night stand has been announced for October 23-26.

Vanderbilt Commodore Quake w/ The Band Perry and Third Eye Blind @ Vanderbilt
Oct 23 @ 7:00 PM

THE SIBLINGS OF THE SOUTH MEET THE STARS FROM SAN FRANCISCO
THE BAND PERRY AND THIRD EYE BLIND TO PERFORM AT THE 15th ANNUAL COMMODORE QUAKE AT VANDERBILT UNIVERSITY

GENERAL PUBLIC TICKETS ON SALE MONDAY, AUGUST 3rd AT 10 AM CST

WHAT: Commodore Quake at Vanderbilt University
WHEN: Friday, October 23rd
WHERE: Memorial Gym — Vanderbilt University Campus
TIME: 8:00 PM Friday October 23rd; Doors Open  – 7:00 PM
TICKETS: Vanderbilt Student (One Ticket Per Student: Available Sept. 9th) – $25; Week of Show (October 18th) – $30; Faculty/Staff  Ticket – $35; General Public Ticket – Purchased in Advance – $40; Week of Show – $50 (October 18th)

NASHVILLE, TN – The annual music bash that is Commodore Quake is back again. Students, alumni, and Nashvillians alike can get excited for two more huge musical acts to take the stage at Memorial Gym on Friday, October 23. This year, The Music Group is excited to present The Band Perry and Third Eye Blind.

Hailing from Mobile, Alabama, the siblings of The Band Perry have been pumping out country hits for years. Starting with their massive single “If I Die Young,” which took the top spot on the Billboard Country charts and went six times platinum, The Band Perry leapt to the forefront of the national country scene and never looked back. Following the success of their first hit, the band’s self-titled debut EP hit number 2 on the Billboard Country chart and also went platinum. Their popularity garnered them a Grammy nomination for Best Country Song and netted them the Best New Artist award at the CMA Awards. Pioneer, the group’s second album, demonstrated a mature progression as the trio continued to find the sound that puts them at the forefront of popular country today. The band then released two more singles, “DONE,” and “Better Dig Two,” which grabbed the top spots on the U.S. Country Airplay list with the latter also taking the number one slot on the U.S. Billboard Country list for multiple weeks. After releasing Pioneer, the band joined country superstars Lady Antebellum and Blake Shelton in separate tours across the country. Between the releases of their studio albums, The Band Perry also toured with Rascal Flatts on their “Live and Loud Tour” and Brad Paisley on his “Virtual Reality Tour”. Most recently, the band has continued its pre-eminence in country with the single “Gentle on My Mind,” which was also good enough to win them the Grammy Award for Best Song by a Country Duo/Group Performance.

Third Eye Blind is known as the band that overwhelmed the 90’s with hits such as “Semi-Charmed Life,” which peaked at number 4 on the Billboard Hot 100 and won the Billboard Music Award for Modern Rock Track of the year in 1997. The group formed in San Francisco in 1993 when Stephen Jenkins, a northern California solo act, decided to put together a band, recruiting bassist Arion Salazar, Kevin Cadogan, and former Counting Crows drummer Brad Hargreaves. Their self-titled debut album, Third Eye Blind, was a smash hit. It reached number 25 on the US Hot 100, sold 6 million copies in the US, and included three top 10 singles. They spent the next three years touring with bands such as U2 and Oasis. Their second album, Blue, was released in 1999, selling 1.25 million copies nationwide, with “Never Let You Go” reaching similar success as an earlier single.  The band toured internationally for many years before taking a break to perform only for charity, including for the Tiger Woods Foundation and the Breathe Benefit Concert in Los Angeles. The early 2000s brought the releases of albums Out of the Vein and Ursa Major, the latter of which was released under their own label, Mega Collider Records. Ursa Major topped the Billboard Rock Albums chart, Top Alternative Albums chart, and Top Digital Albums chart. Their most recent album, Dopamine, which the band started working on as early as 2010, was released in 2015 with the single “Everything is Easy.”

“We are incredibly excited to bring two fantastic bands to Vanderbilt’s campus. In addition, we are looking forward to bringing more musical diversity to the Commodore Quake lineup relative to the past three years,” said Music Group Chair, Kern Vohra, when asked about this year’s Quake Lineup. “This is going to be a great year for Quake, and I can speak for everyone on The Music Group when I say that we are all beyond happy to be a part of it.”

Tickets are available to the general public and will go on sale Monday, August 3rd at all Ticketmaster locations, online at www.ticketmaster.com or by calling 1‐800‐745‐3000. Tickets can also be purchased with no service fees included only at the Sarratt Box Office on the Vanderbilt campus. For general event information, call 615‐322‐2425. For more information, visit http://studentorgs.vanderbilt.edu/commodorequake/ or follow us on Twitter at www.twitter.com/commodorequake.

Oct
24
Sat
Musicians Corner : Martin Sexton Artist To Be Announced Magnolia Sons Ivory Layne @ Centennial Park
Oct 24 all-day

Our Fall 2015 Season takes place September 5 to October 31.

Musicians Corner, a program of The Conservancy for the Parthenon and Centennial Park, presents free weekly lawn parties in Nashville’s Centennial Park on Saturday afternoons in May, June, September and October.

Follow us on Twitter: @muscornernash
Follow us on Instagram: /MusCornerNash
Learn more and get performance schedules at www.musicianscornernashville.com

Musicians Corner is a program of The Conservancy for the Parthenon and Centennial Park, a 5019c)(3) nonprofit organization.

Lightning 100 Presents Jason Isbell with special guest Parker Millsap @ Ryman Auditorium
Oct 24 @ 7:00 PM – 11:00 PM

jasonisbell_lg_0

Jason Isbell

with special guest Amanda Shires
Friday, October 23, 2015
8:00 PM
$35
On sale Friday, April 24 at 10 AM
Share page with AddThis
Click here to enter to win a limited edition Hatch Show Print.

Tickets will be available online ONLY.


Acclaimed, award-winning artist Jason Isbell will release Something More Than Free, his highly anticipated fifth album, on July 17 via Southeastern Records. Something More Than Free features Isbell’s Southern-inspired vignettes of working class men, women and traditions that permeate these 11 new songs. The pure honesty and authenticity of Isbell’s poetic lyrics and soulful vocals have connected deeply with so many, and they shine as brightly as ever on Something More Than Free.

Something More Than Free is Isbell’s most sonically diverse album to date. The opening track, “If It Takes A Lifetime” exudes a classic country tone, while “24 Frames” flows effortlessly with its easy, Laurel Canyon vibe. The wistful folk balladry of “Flagship”, along with the bluesy Southern rock timbre of “Palmetto Rose” and epic “Children Of Children” prove that Jason Isbell is an artist whose creative pinnacle has yet to be within sight.

Something More Than Free is the follow up to Isbell’s 2013 celebrated breakthrough album Southeastern, which received overwhelming support from the press and went on to sell over 150,000 copies. Isbell was subject of stories in outlets ranging from The New York Times Magazine and Wall Street Journal to NPR’s All Things Considered and Fresh Air with Terry Gross. Jason Isbell & The 400 Unit made multiple television appearances, including The Late Show with David Letterman, Conan and Austin City Limits. Isbell won Artist of the Year, Song of the Year (“Cover Me Up”) and Album of the Year at the 2014 Americana Music Awards. Catch Jason and his wife Amanda Shires during a very special performance on The Late Show with David Letterman on April 24.

Along with the media support, the success of Southeastern was the product of good old-fashioned hard work. Much like the working class subjects in his songs, Isbell grinded it out with his band The 400 Unit on the road. They toured extensively, made real connections with his audience, poured his heart out each night and stayed true to his convictions. Audiences grew as venue sizes expanded with sold out shows throughout the U.S. and Europe, including New York’s Beacon Theatre and three sold out nights at Nashville’s historic Ryman Auditorium, where an unprecedented four-night stand has been announced for October 23-26.

Oct
25
Sun
Lightning 100 Presents Jason Isbell with special guest Hurray for the Riff Raff @ Ryman Auditorium
Oct 25 @ 7:00 PM – 11:00 PM

jasonisbell_lg_0

Jason Isbell

with special guest Amanda Shires
Friday, October 23, 2015
8:00 PM
$35
On sale Friday, April 24 at 10 AM
Share page with AddThis
Click here to enter to win a limited edition Hatch Show Print.

Tickets will be available online ONLY.


Acclaimed, award-winning artist Jason Isbell will release Something More Than Free, his highly anticipated fifth album, on July 17 via Southeastern Records. Something More Than Free features Isbell’s Southern-inspired vignettes of working class men, women and traditions that permeate these 11 new songs. The pure honesty and authenticity of Isbell’s poetic lyrics and soulful vocals have connected deeply with so many, and they shine as brightly as ever on Something More Than Free.

Something More Than Free is Isbell’s most sonically diverse album to date. The opening track, “If It Takes A Lifetime” exudes a classic country tone, while “24 Frames” flows effortlessly with its easy, Laurel Canyon vibe. The wistful folk balladry of “Flagship”, along with the bluesy Southern rock timbre of “Palmetto Rose” and epic “Children Of Children” prove that Jason Isbell is an artist whose creative pinnacle has yet to be within sight.

Something More Than Free is the follow up to Isbell’s 2013 celebrated breakthrough album Southeastern, which received overwhelming support from the press and went on to sell over 150,000 copies. Isbell was subject of stories in outlets ranging from The New York Times Magazine and Wall Street Journal to NPR’s All Things Considered and Fresh Air with Terry Gross. Jason Isbell & The 400 Unit made multiple television appearances, including The Late Show with David Letterman, Conan and Austin City Limits. Isbell won Artist of the Year, Song of the Year (“Cover Me Up”) and Album of the Year at the 2014 Americana Music Awards. Catch Jason and his wife Amanda Shires during a very special performance on The Late Show with David Letterman on April 24.

Along with the media support, the success of Southeastern was the product of good old-fashioned hard work. Much like the working class subjects in his songs, Isbell grinded it out with his band The 400 Unit on the road. They toured extensively, made real connections with his audience, poured his heart out each night and stayed true to his convictions. Audiences grew as venue sizes expanded with sold out shows throughout the U.S. and Europe, including New York’s Beacon Theatre and three sold out nights at Nashville’s historic Ryman Auditorium, where an unprecedented four-night stand has been announced for October 23-26.

Nashville Sunday Night Presents: The Sheepdogs with Radio Moscow @ 3rd and Lindsley
Oct 25 @ 8:00 PM – 10:00 PM

Artist

The Sheepdogs built their name on hard work and determination.  Having funded their first three albums and early years of touring on their own, this rock and roll band’s momentum began to build exponentially with the release of the 2010 album, Learn & Burn (which is now certified platinum in Canada). The band would go on to win three 2012 JUNO Awards (the Canadian equivalent of a Grammy): New Group of the Year, Single of the Year and Rock Album of the Year.  With a list of accolades this impressive the band is on the brink of engaging fans on a wider scale.

“The Sheepdogs,” the self-titled album produced by The Black Keys’ Patrick Carney and Austin Scaggs released in 2012, introduced the band to the U.S. and beyond.  The album earned the band three more JUNO nominations for Best Album, Best Single, and Best Group and was certified gold in Canada in 2013.

Hailing from the small Canadian town of Saskatoon, SK, The Sheepdogs won an international competition in 2011 securing them the cover of Rolling Stone, making the group the first unsigned band to appear on its front page. The win, decided by 1.5 million public votes, also scored them a record deal with Atlantic, which offered up a new EP from the band, Five Easy Pieces, in August 2011.

After the band was introduced to Carney at Petty Fest in New York following the contest, he immediately began offering ideas for The Sheepdogs next album (“He seemed strangely passionate about it,” Currie notes). The hope was that Carney could actually produce the album. In January 2012, Carney invited the band to the studio, where they culled together old material and quickly began laying down new ideas.

Although the band had only spent those two and a half weeks with Carney, Scaggs and studio engineer Roger Moutenot in Nashville’s Haptown Studios, the sessions proved fruitful. From “The Way It Is,” a thumping, blues-tinged track, to rollicking stomper “Feeling Good,” the album embraces a vast range of influences, pulling in various styles and genres to create a collection of raucous, unabashed rock and roll numbers. Both “The Way It Is” and “Feeling Good” took the top slot on Canada’s Overall Rock Chart.  A pensive reflection is threaded throughout the album, whether on mid-tempo acoustic track “Laid Back” or on pounding rocker “While We’re Young.”

After touring steadily since 2006 and spending the last year entirely on the road with bands like Kings of Leon, John Fogerty and Robert Randolph & the Family Band, The Sheepdogs hoped to create songs that would lend themselves to their impassioned performances. The band, which has also performed at numerous festivals, including Coachella, Bonnaroo and SXSW, enlisted a keyboard player as the new album features a heavy dose of Hammond organ and Rhodes piano.

In the end it all ties back to the group’s goals, which essentially involve making really good rock songs, and you don’t need a crazy origin story to do that.

Oct
26
Mon
Lightning 100 Presents Jason Isbell with special guest Chris Stapleton @ Ryman Auditorium
Oct 26 @ 7:00 PM – 11:00 PM

jasonisbell_lg_0

Jason Isbell

with special guest Amanda Shires
Friday, October 23, 2015
8:00 PM
$35
On sale Friday, April 24 at 10 AM
Share page with AddThis
Click here to enter to win a limited edition Hatch Show Print.

Tickets will be available online ONLY.


Acclaimed, award-winning artist Jason Isbell will release Something More Than Free, his highly anticipated fifth album, on July 17 via Southeastern Records. Something More Than Free features Isbell’s Southern-inspired vignettes of working class men, women and traditions that permeate these 11 new songs. The pure honesty and authenticity of Isbell’s poetic lyrics and soulful vocals have connected deeply with so many, and they shine as brightly as ever on Something More Than Free.

Something More Than Free is Isbell’s most sonically diverse album to date. The opening track, “If It Takes A Lifetime” exudes a classic country tone, while “24 Frames” flows effortlessly with its easy, Laurel Canyon vibe. The wistful folk balladry of “Flagship”, along with the bluesy Southern rock timbre of “Palmetto Rose” and epic “Children Of Children” prove that Jason Isbell is an artist whose creative pinnacle has yet to be within sight.

Something More Than Free is the follow up to Isbell’s 2013 celebrated breakthrough album Southeastern, which received overwhelming support from the press and went on to sell over 150,000 copies. Isbell was subject of stories in outlets ranging from The New York Times Magazine and Wall Street Journal to NPR’s All Things Considered and Fresh Air with Terry Gross. Jason Isbell & The 400 Unit made multiple television appearances, including The Late Show with David Letterman, Conan and Austin City Limits. Isbell won Artist of the Year, Song of the Year (“Cover Me Up”) and Album of the Year at the 2014 Americana Music Awards. Catch Jason and his wife Amanda Shires during a very special performance on The Late Show with David Letterman on April 24.

Along with the media support, the success of Southeastern was the product of good old-fashioned hard work. Much like the working class subjects in his songs, Isbell grinded it out with his band The 400 Unit on the road. They toured extensively, made real connections with his audience, poured his heart out each night and stayed true to his convictions. Audiences grew as venue sizes expanded with sold out shows throughout the U.S. and Europe, including New York’s Beacon Theatre and three sold out nights at Nashville’s historic Ryman Auditorium, where an unprecedented four-night stand has been announced for October 23-26.

Lightning 100 Presents: Lianne La Havas @ Exit/In
Oct 26 @ 8:00 PM

Lightning 100 Presents:

Lianne La Havas

MON, OCTOBER 26, 2015

DOORS: 7:00 PM / SHOW: 8:00 PM

EXIT/IN

NASHVILLE, TN

$20.00 – $55.00

THIS EVENT IS 18 AND OVER

Absolutely no refunds – no exceptions. Lineups and times are subject to change.
Gov’t issued ID required. No re-entry.

Lianne La Havas

Lianne La Havas

The young English singer/songwriter/guitarist Lianne La Havas’s debut 2012 album Is Your Love Big Enough? received more accolades than many artists experience in their entire career. Sparked by a sensational introduction on Later with Jools Holland, the year-plus that followed the album’s release included more than 120 shows across Europe, North America, and Japan—including two sold-out London shows at the O2 Shepherd’s Bush Empire and a sold-out headline show at the Somerset House Summer Series—and a top five position on the UK chart. Is Your Love Big Enough? won iTunes’ Album of the Year in the UK and earned Ivor Novello Best Album and Barclaycard Mercury Prize nominations.

The media concurred, with the Associated Press calling Is Your Love Big Enough? “Not just one of the year’s best debuts, but one of the year’s best albums,” NPR praising “the sound of a new and electrifying voice,” and the Los Angeles Times saying “With Is Your Love Big Enough?, Miss La Havas vaults right to the big leagues.” Artists that La Havas had admired soon began reaching out to her, to express support and/or collaborate, including Prince, Stevie Wonder, Jill Scott and Justin Vernon (Bon Iver).

After touring for the album came to a close, it was time to reacquaint herself with family and old friends as La Havas returned to what she calls “real life.” To recharge, she took a trip with her mother, who is of Jamaican heritage, to the Caribbean island. Little did she know that this holiday would sow the seeds for her next record.

“It turned out to be a life-changing experience,” says La Havas (whose father is of Greek heritage). “I was brought up by my Jamaican grandparents, and I was well acquainted with a lot of their culture, like the food and the manner of their generation. So when I actually went there it was strangely familiar—but also completely unlike any other place that I’d been. It was just so amazing to know all about a place and to even be able to understand strong patois, without ever having been there.”

During this time of self-discovery, La Havas enjoyed emotional reunions with long-lost relatives, spent time in Kingston’s clubs, and even jammed in front of her family for the first time during a session with acclaimed dancehall/reggae producer Stephen McGregor. Discovering her roots inspired La Havas to reflect on the connections between the present and the past, which in turn sparked the songs that would become her future. “Everything seemed to have a lot more clarity, and I really wanted to speak about it,” she says.

La Havas’ new album, Blood, is a collection that shakes, shimmies, and swings with imaginative and immersive grooves. “It seems as though you hear music everywhere you go in Jamaica and there are gigs going on all the time at the beach,” she says. “People appear to have an in-built ability to dance, which comes from a deep-rooted connection to the feeling in the music. I found a new way to enjoy rhythms and syncopation and how to interweave delicate guitar parts with more aggressive sounding beats. What I definitely took from Jamaica is how to write songs based on the feeling of the rhythm and to build from there, and I’ve applied that philosophy, in some form, to everything I’ve written thereafter.”

The first single, “Unstoppable,” is particularly indicative of that bass- and groove-orientated feeling. Produced and co-written by Adele/FKA twigs collaborator Paul Epworth and founded on an instrumental recording by The Invisible, “Unstoppable” is a song that La Havas wrote to help to repair a relationship that she had ended. “It represents having a new phase of understanding in our relationship. My former boyfriend was interested heavily in astronomy, so Paul and I wanted to find some way to relate galactic celestial speak to this love story to support its unconventional and multi-faceted nature.”

Lyrically, the songs that emerged are almost all related to “the feeling of who you are and where you come from,” she says. The centerpiece of that approach is “Green & Gold,” which was written and produced with Jamie Lidell and Matt Hales. It weaves Jamaican and Greek imagery into an autobiographical narrative that offers insight into the “weird and wonderful journey that I’ve been on since I was a child” In fact, it was La Havas’ second generation Greek-English father—a stonemason and enthusiastic accordion player and instrumentalist—who was the primary musical influence in her life and first taught her guitar and piano.

Family is of course a prominent theme on Blood, from “Fairytale”—about La Havas’ close relative whose ability to suddenly become an “amazing and capable” single mother has been a source of inspiration—to “Good Goodbye,” which addresses her dear friend losing her grandfather and also relates to her own grandmother. “It’s about appreciating your elders, but also all of your loved ones,” she explains. “If you have the opportunity, you should spend as much time with them as possible; if it’s going to be goodbye, make sure it’s a good one.”

“Midnight” best encapsulates La Havas’ adventures in life and music. “Being in Jamaica and writing this song really signified the coming of a new phase, as well as having a new understanding of everything as I enter my mid-20s and find a new sense of independence,” she summarizes. “For me, it’s got an overall sentiment of empowerment and emancipation.”

That next stage commenced with a steady succession of guest appearances. There’s been another recording with Is Your Love Big Enough? producer Matt Hales (who again collaborated with La Havas on Blood, notably on “Wonderful,” which they co-wrote with Disclosure’s Howard Lawrence) on the recent Aqualung track “Egg Shells,” as well as guest vocals on Alt-J’s “Warm Foothills” and Tourist’s “Patterns.”

Most extraordinary of all was La Havas’ contribution to Prince’s Art Official Age album (also on Warner Bros.), which was recorded over the course of a heady weekend at Paisley Park. “Anyone liking my music is great, but it’s just a bit crazier when it’s someone that you’ve admired all your life—memorized all of their lyrics, etc.—and they then turn out to be wonderful people that just happen to be like-minded.”

Family and friends, the past and the future, and an international array of cultural influences are all part of a rich tapestry that makes up Blood. “I’m constantly surprised by the coincidences of life” admits Lianne. “The title Blood reminds me that there are connections between pretty much everything, no matter what.”

With major summer shows already confirmed—including Glastonbury, Latitude and Bestival—followed by headline tours of the UK, USA, and Europe, the stage is set for Lianne La Havas to continue, as the Daily Mail predicted, her ascent as “Britain’s next big female star.

Oct
27
Tue
CHVRCHES @ Marathon Music Works
Oct 27 @ 8:00 PM – 11:30 PM
CHVRCHES

CHVRCHES

In little more than twelve months CHVRCHES have come out of nowhere to be everywhere. There’s a lot to catch up on since they posted their first song, Lies, online last May – a place in the top five of the BBC Sound of 2013, sell out headline tours in the UK and US (the most recent US tour playing to almost 20,000 people over 18 shows), a triumphant, award-winning appearance at SXSW and a string of stadium dates with Depeche Mode, to name but a few.

The excitement around that debut track was enhanced by the fact that there wasn’t so much as a photo of the band online. Who was that facelessly contorting the legacy of electronic music into surprisingly palatable new shapes? Lauren Mayberry, Iain Cook and Martin Doherty weren’t being deliberately coy – they were just hard at work capturing a sound that, in the tradition of all great musical alchemies, even surprised the band that made it.

Lies was followed in the summer by The Mother We Share – a euphoric, expertly-crafted piece of synthpop with a warm emotional centre that captured the imagination of a million listeners and saw the band step out from the shadows to put faces to the names. Both tracks, alongside bona fide singles Recover and Gun, feature on CHVRCHES’ longed-for debut album, The Bones of What You Believe, out now.

The album was produced by the band and recorded in Cook’s Alucard Studio in Glasgow, before being mixed by Rich Costey (Nine Inch Nails, Rage Against The Machine, Arctic Monkeys, Sigur Ros). “To me this is an indie rock band,” says Doherty. “Guitars are just replaced with keyboards – we want it rough.” The band’s peculiar magic lies in their juxtaposition of joy and doubt – these are robust, colourful pop songs whose lyrics reveal doubt and humanity, enhanced by the purity of Mayberry’s voice.

Cook and Doherty watched the world of electronics develop from behind more traditional instruments. Cook, who also composes for TV and film, played with the Scottish alt-rock group Aereogramme and was one half of its later incarnation The Unwinding Hours, whilst Doherty played keyboards for The Twilight Sad. Neither made music that sounded quite like this, until Mayberry – then working as a music journalist while singing with Glaswegian post-rock collective Blue Sky Archives, with whom Cook had previously recorded – turned up to help with a demo.

“I was late, I didn’t know the way, it was Sunday buses, it wasn’t a good start!” she recalls – “And this is going to sound weird,” Doherty cuts in, “but within thirty seconds of hearing her singing with us I knew this was something special. The range, the tone, the way the voice worked over the synths – it was immediate. I’d heard her voice before and liked it, but I wanted to take it out of its comfort zone. Now there’s a power to the vocal we never heard at first.”

During their recent headline tours Mayberry’s voice – a cut-glass, sci-fi soprano rounded off with warm Glaswegian tones – has developed into a formidable force. Onstage Cook and Doherty stand behind two banks of analogue synths, linked by a controller, allowing them to access one another’s machines and dovetail their bright explosions of sound. Their digital/analogue interface recalls their ’80s heroes Prince and Depeche Mode but they work with the era-spanning musical know-how of Kieran Hebden and the celebratory spirit of LCD Soundsystem.

The twelve songs that make up The Bones of What You Believe are linked by their humanity but Mayberry’s lyrics are abstract and strangely inspirational. “With teeth we’ve come this far, I’ll take this thing by the throat and walk away,” she sings on By The Throat: everywhere, the imagery of flesh and blood, love and hope, rub up against Doherty and Cook’s aggressive synth fills and spluttering fanfares. On You Caught The Light, Doherty takes lead vocals and Cook’s guitar is reminiscent of Simple Minds or The Cure – an indie-rock yearning in an electronic world. Science and Visions (“a kind of sci-fi stalker story,” Mayberry laughs) sets her choirboy voice on a dark and ominous techno soundscape; on Lungs the sweetest melody gets an attack of crunchy bass and guitar. “That sweet and sour contrast is the key,” says Mayberry; adds Cook, “we pushed aggression in the production whenever there was sweetness in the vocal – we all gravitate towards that balance.”

Above all, the album is characterised by a combination of passion and restraint, Cook and Doherty often withholding their wizardry to let the melodies speak for themselves. That subtle balance is the sound of experience – three musicians who are endlessly excited by the sound they have discovered, but clearly in it for the long haul.

Oct
30
Fri
Sturgill Simpson with Billy Wayne Davis @ Ryman Auditorium
Oct 30 @ 8:00 PM – 11:00 PM

Sturgill Simpson

with Billy Wayne Davis
Friday, October 30, 2015
8:00 PM
$50, $35 & $30
On Sale Friday, July 24 at 10 AM
Share page with AddThis

Tickets available ONLINE ONLY.


Sturgill Simpson’s highly anticipated “Living The Dream” fall tour will extend through November including two nights at Nashville’s historic Ryman Auditorium as well as shows in Buffalo, Atlanta, Denver, Salt Lake City, Spokane, Vancouver, Seattle, Portland, Eugene, Oakland, Los Angeles and San Diego. Previously announced tour stops include Asheville, Norfolk, Charlottesville, Philadelphia, New York, Washington, DC and Baltimore. See below for complete details. Tickets for the second leg of the tour go on-sale this Friday, July 24.

The fall tour celebrates Sturgill’s highly acclaimed 2014 release, Metamodern Sounds In Country Music (iTunesAmazonBandcamp), which continues to receive overwhelming acclaim. The Americana Association recently nominated him in three categories at their 2015 Honors & Awards—“Artist of the Year,” “Album of the Year” and “Song of the Year” (for “Turtles All The Way Down”). Sturgill’s widely praised guitarist, Laur Joamets, was also nominated for “Instrumentalist of the Year.” Sturgill won “Emerging Artist of the Year” at last year’s awards.

In the past year, Sturgill and his band—bassist Kevin Black, guitarist Laur Joamets and drummer Miles Miller—have performed twice on the “Late Show with David Letterman” (“Life of Sin,” “Long White Line”), “The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon,” twice on “Conan” (“Living the Dream,” “Just Let Go”) and “Late Night with Seth Meyers” as well as on the PBS’ Austin City Limits (air date TBD), BBC’s “Later Live with Jools Holland,” “Later…with Jools Holland,” American Public Media’s “A Prairie Home Companion,” and NPR Music’s “Tiny Desk Concert” series.

Metamodern Sounds In Country Music was also featured in year-end “Best of 2014” lists at The New York TimesRolling Stone, the Village Voices’ Pazz and JopRolling Stone CountryNPR MusicAmerican SongwriterStereogum, the Los Angeles TimesKCRWPitchforkThe Washington PostPaste, the Nashville SceneNo Depression and many others.

Produced by Dave Cobb, Metamodern Sounds In Country Music was recorded live-to-tape at Nashville’s LCS studio over four days in late 2013. Of the album, Simpson comments, “Myriad worldly offerings—religion, drugs, and more—all claim to be the omnipotent universal truth, but in my experience, love is the only certainty. That’s what this record is about.”

Oct
31
Sat
Musicians Corner : Fall Season Closer & Halloween Celebration : The Lonely Biscuits, The Whistles & The Bells, Moonsville Collective, Justin Klump @ Centennial Park
Oct 31 all-day

Our Fall 2015 Season takes place September 5 to October 31.

Musicians Corner, a program of The Conservancy for the Parthenon and Centennial Park, presents free weekly lawn parties in Nashville’s Centennial Park on Saturday afternoons in May, June, September and October.

Follow us on Twitter: @muscornernash
Follow us on Instagram: /MusCornerNash
Learn more and get performance schedules at www.musicianscornernashville.com

Musicians Corner is a program of The Conservancy for the Parthenon and Centennial Park, a 5019c)(3) nonprofit organization.

Lightning 100’s Paranormal Rocktivity w/ Here Come the Mummies @ Marathon Music Works
Oct 31 @ 7:00 PM – 11:45 PM

Lightning 100’s Paranormal Rocktivity w/ Here Come the Mummies

SAT, OCTOBER 31, 2015

DOORS: 8:00 PM / SHOW: 9:00 PM

MARATHON MUSIC WORKS

NASHVILLE, TN

$30.00 – $35.00

THIS EVENT IS 18 AND OVER

ABSOLUTELY NO REFUNDS – NO EXCEPTIONS. LINEUPS AND TIMES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE.
GOV’T ISSUED ID REQUIRED. NO RE-ENTRY.

Here Come The Mummies

Here Come The Mummies

It’s been a long and dusty road since 1922 when, at a dig in the desert south of Tunis, Professor
Nigel Quentin Fontanelle Dumblucke IV (1895-) unearthed the ruins of an ancient discotheque
to find a dozen undead Egyptian mummies inexplicably throwing down what he dubbed,
“Terrifying Funk From Beyond the Grave.”
From these hovering souls, who called themselves Here Come The Mummies, Professor
Dumblucke learned of the powerful curse that doomed them to wander the earth, seeking the
ultimate riff, the one that may allow their spirits to rest after eons of, as they put it, “banging out
solid fly grooves, y’all.” But their story was murky at best…
What is clear is that these saucy specters resurfaced around the turn of the Millennium. Without
so much as a hot bath, HCTM would open for P-Funk and Al Green, rock Super Bowl Village
2012, become regulars on The Bob and Tom Show and at massive festivals like Summerfest
and Musikfest, and make themselves the darlings of sell-out crowds over wide swaths of North
America. Maybe that’s why the ladies (and some dudes) can’t stop losing their minds over
these mayhem-inducing mavens of mirth.
2013 saw HCTM pool what remained of their dusty hearts, addled brains, and withered
appendages to make Cryptic, their acclaimed sixth studio album.
2014 has been HCTM’s most prolific year to date! Three of five scheduled 5-song EPs have
been released so far: A La Mode, Pull it Off, and Shocker. An adapted version of
Rejuvannihilation, a new full-length concert film, is airing across the US on Public Television’s
Front and Center.
Some say they were cursed after deflowering a great Pharaoh’s daughter. Others claim they are
reincarnated Grammy-Winning studio musicians. Regardless, HCTM’s mysterious personas,
cunning song-craft, and unrelenting live show will bend your brain, and melt your face. Get
ready, Here Come The Mummies.
“Here Come The Mummies are one bad-ass band, a hybrid of Idris Muhammad, George
Clinton, Ohio Players, and Earth, Wind & Fire.” -Blurt Magazine
“A band unlike any other.” -examiner.com
“That’s the most fun I’ve had in 20 years.” -Bob Kevoian, The Bob & Tom Show
“Cock wobbling brilliant.” -Joe Elliott of Def Leppard
Sturgill Simpson with Billy Wayne Davis @ Ryman Auditorium
Oct 31 @ 8:00 PM – 11:00 PM

Sturgill Simpson

with Billy Wayne Davis
Friday, October 30, 2015
8:00 PM
$50, $35 & $30
On Sale Friday, July 24 at 10 AM
Share page with AddThis

Tickets available ONLINE ONLY.


Sturgill Simpson’s highly anticipated “Living The Dream” fall tour will extend through November including two nights at Nashville’s historic Ryman Auditorium as well as shows in Buffalo, Atlanta, Denver, Salt Lake City, Spokane, Vancouver, Seattle, Portland, Eugene, Oakland, Los Angeles and San Diego. Previously announced tour stops include Asheville, Norfolk, Charlottesville, Philadelphia, New York, Washington, DC and Baltimore. See below for complete details. Tickets for the second leg of the tour go on-sale this Friday, July 24.

The fall tour celebrates Sturgill’s highly acclaimed 2014 release, Metamodern Sounds In Country Music (iTunesAmazonBandcamp), which continues to receive overwhelming acclaim. The Americana Association recently nominated him in three categories at their 2015 Honors & Awards—“Artist of the Year,” “Album of the Year” and “Song of the Year” (for “Turtles All The Way Down”). Sturgill’s widely praised guitarist, Laur Joamets, was also nominated for “Instrumentalist of the Year.” Sturgill won “Emerging Artist of the Year” at last year’s awards.

In the past year, Sturgill and his band—bassist Kevin Black, guitarist Laur Joamets and drummer Miles Miller—have performed twice on the “Late Show with David Letterman” (“Life of Sin,” “Long White Line”), “The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon,” twice on “Conan” (“Living the Dream,” “Just Let Go”) and “Late Night with Seth Meyers” as well as on the PBS’ Austin City Limits (air date TBD), BBC’s “Later Live with Jools Holland,” “Later…with Jools Holland,” American Public Media’s “A Prairie Home Companion,” and NPR Music’s “Tiny Desk Concert” series.

Metamodern Sounds In Country Music was also featured in year-end “Best of 2014” lists at The New York TimesRolling Stone, the Village Voices’ Pazz and JopRolling Stone CountryNPR MusicAmerican SongwriterStereogum, the Los Angeles TimesKCRWPitchforkThe Washington PostPaste, the Nashville SceneNo Depression and many others.

Produced by Dave Cobb, Metamodern Sounds In Country Music was recorded live-to-tape at Nashville’s LCS studio over four days in late 2013. Of the album, Simpson comments, “Myriad worldly offerings—religion, drugs, and more—all claim to be the omnipotent universal truth, but in my experience, love is the only certainty. That’s what this record is about.”

Nov
1
Sun
Sturgill Simpson with Billy Wayne Davis @ Ryman Auditorium
Nov 1 @ 8:00 PM – 11:00 PM

Sturgill Simpson

with Billy Wayne Davis
Friday, October 30, 2015
8:00 PM
$50, $35 & $30
On Sale Friday, July 24 at 10 AM
Share page with AddThis

Tickets available ONLINE ONLY.


Sturgill Simpson’s highly anticipated “Living The Dream” fall tour will extend through November including two nights at Nashville’s historic Ryman Auditorium as well as shows in Buffalo, Atlanta, Denver, Salt Lake City, Spokane, Vancouver, Seattle, Portland, Eugene, Oakland, Los Angeles and San Diego. Previously announced tour stops include Asheville, Norfolk, Charlottesville, Philadelphia, New York, Washington, DC and Baltimore. See below for complete details. Tickets for the second leg of the tour go on-sale this Friday, July 24.

The fall tour celebrates Sturgill’s highly acclaimed 2014 release, Metamodern Sounds In Country Music (iTunesAmazonBandcamp), which continues to receive overwhelming acclaim. The Americana Association recently nominated him in three categories at their 2015 Honors & Awards—“Artist of the Year,” “Album of the Year” and “Song of the Year” (for “Turtles All The Way Down”). Sturgill’s widely praised guitarist, Laur Joamets, was also nominated for “Instrumentalist of the Year.” Sturgill won “Emerging Artist of the Year” at last year’s awards.

In the past year, Sturgill and his band—bassist Kevin Black, guitarist Laur Joamets and drummer Miles Miller—have performed twice on the “Late Show with David Letterman” (“Life of Sin,” “Long White Line”), “The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon,” twice on “Conan” (“Living the Dream,” “Just Let Go”) and “Late Night with Seth Meyers” as well as on the PBS’ Austin City Limits (air date TBD), BBC’s “Later Live with Jools Holland,” “Later…with Jools Holland,” American Public Media’s “A Prairie Home Companion,” and NPR Music’s “Tiny Desk Concert” series.

Metamodern Sounds In Country Music was also featured in year-end “Best of 2014” lists at The New York TimesRolling Stone, the Village Voices’ Pazz and JopRolling Stone CountryNPR MusicAmerican SongwriterStereogum, the Los Angeles TimesKCRWPitchforkThe Washington PostPaste, the Nashville SceneNo Depression and many others.

Produced by Dave Cobb, Metamodern Sounds In Country Music was recorded live-to-tape at Nashville’s LCS studio over four days in late 2013. Of the album, Simpson comments, “Myriad worldly offerings—religion, drugs, and more—all claim to be the omnipotent universal truth, but in my experience, love is the only certainty. That’s what this record is about.”

Nov
5
Thu
The Milk Carton Kids @ James K Polk Theater
Nov 5 @ 8:00 PM – 11:00 PM

The Milk Carton Kids will be at James K. Polk Theater in Nashville, TN – November 5, 2015 at 8:00 p.m.

Grammy-nominated harmony duo The Milk Carton Kids have announced the May 19, 2015 release of their third album, Monterey. A refreshing alternative to the foot-stomping grandeur of the so-called “folk revival,” an understated virtuosity defines The Milk Carton Kids and their new album. The two years since the release of their last album, The Ash & Clay, have been significant ones for the group. In addition to a Grammy nomination for Best Folk Album, The Milk Carton Kids won Duo/Group of the Year at the Americana Music Awards in 2014. Their featured performances and interviews in T Bone Burnett & the Coen Brothers’ concert documentary, “Another Day/Another Time,” brought the band its widest audience and their 55-city North American tour last year sold out months in advance. Cultural purveyors from Garrison Keillor to T Bone Burnett to Billy Bragg have hailed the duo’s importance among a group of new folk bands, both expanding and contradicting the rich tradition that precedes them. Yet while some of the band’s many accolades reference a specific genre, the duo quickly transcends those tags with clear inflections of jazz, classical, even the dark lyricism of modern “alternative.” This past year, The Milk Carton Kids were asked to pay tribute to Johnny Cash and Emmylou Harris — Cash on the Joe Henry-produced remake of “Bitter Tears,” and Harris with their standing ovation performance at the tribute concert “The Life & Songs of Emmylou Harris,” among luminaries including Kris Kristofferson, Mavis Staples, Alison Kraus, Iron & Wine, and Harris herself. If Cash and Harris taught us that American music is meant to be taken at its expansive word, without confines or borders, The Milk Carton Kids appear to have taken the lesson to heart.

Nov
11
Wed
Sufjan Stevens with Gallant @ Ryman Auditorium
Nov 11 @ 7:30 PM – 11:00 PM

 

Sufjan Stevens is a singer-songwriter currently living in Brooklyn, NY. A preoccupation with epic concepts has motivated two state records (Michigan & Illinois), a collection of sacred and biblical songs (Seven Swans), an electronic album for the animals of the Chinese zodiac (Enjoy Your Rabbit), two Christmas box sets (Songs for Christmas, vol. 1-5 and Silver & Gold, vol. 6-10), and a programmatic tone poem for the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway (The BQE). In 2010 Sufjan released an expansive EP (All Delighted People) and the full length The Age of Adz, a collection of songs partly inspired by the outsider artist Royal Robertson. His most recent release is an album entitled Carrie & Lowell.

Born in Detroit and raised in Northern Michigan, Sufjan attended Hope College, in Holland, Michigan, and the masters program for writers at the New School for Social Research.

Nov
12
Thu
Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness and New Politics @ Cannery Ballroom
Nov 12 @ 7:00 PM – 11:00 PM

THE WILDERNESS POLITICS TOUR presented by Journeys: ANDREW McMAHON IN THE WILDERNESS and NEW POLITICS

with The Griswolds and LOLO

Andrew McMahon In The Wilderness

→ Official Website

“I wrote a pop record and then she showed up.” Andrew McMahon laughs, cradling his 6-month-old daughter, Cecilia, as his wife Kelly lounges nearby with their dog, Doris. The young family is backstage at the Stone Pony in Asbury Park relaxing before McMahon performs a sold out headlining show. McMahon is referring to his new release, the self-titled LP, Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness.

McMahon has had a winding road to this artfully balanced life. This is a man who was diagnosed with cancer at 22 years old, on the cusp of releasing his debut album (as Jack’s Mannequin). Who wed Kelly the following year and then took on an arduous schedule of touring and album releases. Who was nominated for an Emmy Award for his song “I Heard Your Voice in a Dream” on NBC’s Smash. Who sold nearly 2 million albums in a little more than a decade. Who, for much of that time, was struggling underneath the weight of it all.

Despite these outward signs of success – beating cancer, getting married and an Emmy nom – McMahon says the road to recovery was “a rollercoaster ride” that took the better part of a decade. “My body healed faster than my mind and my heart. It took me years to realize that and do the work. I had to figure out how to acclimate to the world post-illness. I decided to take time away from the business of making music so I could pay attention to everything else. I left my label, my management and the name I had been making music under for the better part of my 20s. I moved out of Los Angeles. It was a metaphorical hard reset.”

The time allowed McMahon to process what had happened and to renew his passion for songwriting and record making, to refill the well of his creativity. McMahon also changed his mode of operation, taking the critical step of physically distancing his work and home lives by retreating to a cabin – “a shack, really. It had no running water,” – in Topanga Canyon (CA) to hatch the album. He would spend the weekdays in the canyon immersed in music and on the weekends travel the hour and a half back south to be with his then-newly-pregnant wife. “It was important to me to be completely present when I was home. Separating out the work actually created more space to live a life worth writing about.”

In Topanga, Andrew was able to focus intensely on song craft. He poured his feelings into his work: the anticipation and anxiety about becoming a father, excitement for meeting his new daughter, ambivalence about entering his 30s. Soon after the Canyon sessions, McMahon began working with producer Mike Viola, who McMahon calls “the album’s spirit guide.” In Viola’s Echo Park garage studio, the two of them meditated on a range of classic rock and modern artists.

At the same time, McMahon began to consider the might-have-beens of his life. “I found myself asking, ‘What would have come next if I hadn’t encountered that bizarre chapter of my disrupted 20s?’ As I was writing the new songs, I was able to revisit relationships that had evolved or been dismantled in the vacuum of that disruption.” He adds, “It’s not that I wanted to erase my past. I wanted to explore it, to go back to the point where I had lost myself, where my personal narrative was overtaken, and move forward from there.”

“High Dive” emerged from the sessions with Viola and is the most representative of this sort of Sliding Doors exploration. “‘High Dive’ asks the question ‘If I had never gotten sick, where would I be?’” says McMahon. “My illness put a lot into perspective for my wife (then girlfriend) and I. With ‘High Dive’ I imagined what it would have been like if we’d split up and she’d moved on. In a universal sense, it’s about letting someone go and realizing you were wrong, but it’s too late.” The song buoys McMahon’s gentle tenor, slowly building from a spare composition with a snapping, driving beat, ‘High Dive’ swells into the

bridge (“Flashbacks get me close”) and resolves into a viscerally satisfying chorus flush with other voices, McMahon’s piano wrapping around the melody.

Intimate details populate the album, with McMahon writing sometimes obliquely, sometimes frankly about his struggles. “See Her on the Weekend,” a literal recounting of his time in Topanga, drops the aside “I drink more than the doctors say I should.” “Halls” outlines self-sabotaging tendencies in service of his career, “Cut my hair, and I found me a new girlfriend / Thought a broken heart could write a perfect song.” “All Our Lives” is particularly unguarded but even when he’s singing about someone else, an old friend with “a heart so gold, and words so blue / in a body home from hell,” you wonder if he’s not singing about himself in some roundabout way.

The first single, “Cecilia and the Satellite” was actually one of the last songs written for the album. “A few weeks before Cecilia was born, I was introduced to James Flannigan, a British songwriter and producer. I knew I wanted to write a song for her, to show her who I was before she was born and my commitment to protect her.” While “Cecilia” details McMahon’s love in high contrast with what he calls “the impermanence of living,” – its soaring chorus anchored by a kick drum like the steady thump of a heartbeat.

After seeing the impressive results of their session, McMahon asked Flannigan to join him and Viola to help finish production of the album. The three of them bounced around LA in various production spaces and studios until all the details had been tweaked and McMahon was satisfied that it reflected the journey as a whole. “I had been dreaming about an album that sounded like this for years, but I didn’t know it until I heard it. It took all three of us. I realize now how important every piece of the process was – every step on the path and every voice in the room.”

If, as McMahon says, “music is a mirror to the adventure of living,” then it follows that each new chapter of life deserves its own title. As such, he decided his music would go forward under the name Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness. “My wilderness is mostly abstract,” he posits, “I forced myself into strange new places on the hunt for these songs, and I met some amazing people in the process. The new name carries the spirit of our collaboration.”

There is a balancing act that permeates not only McMahon’s life but his new album as well, mixing the electronic and the acoustic, the modern and the classic. But even though McMahon may have created two mini-masterpieces: an epic pop album stocked to the gills with anthemic songs and a healthy, bright, baby girl with Kelly, there’s no question which one he’s more proud of.

New Politics

→ Official Website

Ask any artist about the creative process, and they’ll all agree on one thing—you can’t force it.

When inspiration gathers, you simply ride the wave and hold on for dear life.  While writing Vikings, their third full-length album and first for DCD2 Records/Warner Bros. Records, the members of New Politics—David Boyd [lead vocals, guitar], Søren Hansen [bass, guitar, keys, programming] who came to the states from Denmark, and NY Native Louis Vecchio [drums]—embraced that spirit wholeheartedly. Without any deadlines or plan to speak of, the trio began writing songs for fun during 2014’s Monumentour with Paramore and Fall Out Boy.

“It wasn’t like anyone was expecting anything from us,” recalls David. “We would just go into the back of the bus and create songs. It came so naturally and fast that it was a blast. It took us back to when we were originally writing as kids. Back before we had no label or management or anything. It was simple.”

“We were together all the time, and everything was composed as a unit,” remarks Louis. “The vibe and the creative juices were flowing effortlessly on a daily basis.”

As soon as they got off the road, the trio chose to record a good chunk of the material in David and Søren’s Brooklyn apartment. That proved apropos in and of itself as the two Denmark natives had completely adopted a “New York State of Mind” after four years stateside and a myriad of crazy experiences.

“There’s so much energy in New York, and Brooklyn specifically” says David. “There’s so much to write about and relate to. There’s so much color. You meet people. You meet girls. You find romance in the oddest of places.  There’s all kinds of culture from a dance scene to a hip-hop scene to a rock scene. It always gives you something to ponder. We finally became a part of the environment and are reflecting that musically.”

As a result, the new music threads together a patchwork of femme fatales who, as David admits, might be “crashing on my couch and barely wearing anything” like the vixen in “50 Feet Tall” or “choosing a girl instead of me” as happens during “Girl Crush.” The stories unfold in tandem with a soundtrack of danceable alternative that’s unafraid to pop or to rock for that matter.

Following the Brooklyn sessions, the boys hopped a plane to L.A. Under the palm trees and SoCal sun, they committed the other half of the album to analog tape in Butch Walker’s studio with longtime collaborator and Grammy Award-nominated producer Jake Sinclair [Weezer, Taylor Swift].

“Recording to tape gave it this authentic feel,” says David. “There’s a certain honesty and rawness you get from doing it like that. It was an amazing experience.”

The opening track and first single “Everywhere I Go (Kings & Queens)” juggles a handclap-propelled guitar riff with a stadium-size beat and robust refrain. “It’s a pat on the shoulder to our fans and our team,” the frontman continues. “We’ve stuck with the dream, and they’ve stuck with all of our nonsense! We’re in this together.”

“It’s a nice way of being like, ‘We did it! I told you so,’” smiles Louis. “It’s dedicated to everybody who stood by us in our corner and the fans who didn’t let go. We wanted to say thanks!”

Meanwhile, the follow-up single “West End Kids” tempers shimmering keys with a heavenly and hypnotic chant of, “We’re just some kids from the West End.”

David admits, “It’s the first chance we’ve had to reflect on this roller coaster. Soren and I started this project back in Denmark, moved to America, went through culture shock, spent every dollar we had, ended up with nothing, started from scratch once more, and built it all up again. Now, we wrote this summer party song that celebrates how far we’ve come and the part of Copenhagen (West End) that started it all.”

New Politics have certainly come a long way from Copenhagen. Developing his live persona and charisma as a young teen, David immersed himself in music by breakdancing as part of an internationally recognized touring dance crew. He naturally evolved into a singer, but never lost that kinetic spark while founding New Politics with Søren. If anything, he’s more likely to bust a move on stage now than ever. “I can’t help it,” he grins. “Music just makes me move.”

Relocating to New York, the group’s self-titled major label debut dropped in 2010 and featured the single “Yeah Yeah Yeah.”  Its 2013 follow-up A Bad Girl in Harlem boasted the hit “Harlem,” which landed on multiple Frozen trailers as well as garnering placements for America’s Got Talent, Microsoft, and Taco Bell. Along the way, the group has toured with everybody from 30 Seconds To Mars and Neon Trees to P!nk and The Pretty Reckless in addition to selling out countless headline shows and hitting the stage on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon and Jimmy Kimmel LIVE!

Ultimately, the album title speaks to New Politics’ vision. “Soren and I always pick on Louis since he’s the only American, it’s two against one, and Louis started calling us Vikings,” chuckles David. “We keep reminding him. Now, we’re invading America, but not raiding it. We’re going to take over by love and sharing our music. We’re never going to force it though!”

 

The Griswolds

→ Official Website

As far as debut album mantras go, “Be Impressive” is a fantastically simple statement of intent.

For Sydney party-starters The Griswolds it proved the driving ideal that would shake off the daiquiri- flavoured tropical tones of their Heart of a Lion EP and unite the four-piece’s more refined musical goals. Be Impressive? These 11 shimmering, anthemic tracks are that and more. Be Impressive isn’t just an indie- rock record you can dance to; it’s a record that’ll break and mend your heart, have you dancing with joy. It’s the hedonistic island paradise that’s an escape from all of your worries… before it becomes obvious it’s better to confront them than to run away.

It’s a long way from the Sydney houseparty where Christopher Whitehall (vocals/guitar) challenged “sometime drinking buddy” Daniel Duque-Perez (guitar/synth), to write a riff on the spot. “That was how the band started,” laughs Dan. “Chris thought that riff was really fun and interesting, and it turned into our first single, ’Mississippi’. The two of us realised that perhaps we could do something really cool, that the way we wrote songs together was something neither of us wanted to waste.”

‘Mississippi’ and second single ‘Heart of a Lion’ from their debut EP launched the band to a worldwide audience and having finally settled on a name (thanks to a passing comment about National Lampoon’s Family Vacation), the band were suddenly playing shows with San Cisco, Last Dinosaurs and touring Australia to ever-increasing crowds. “It was great; a whirlwind,” reflects Dan. “That’s what we want to do; write fun songs, and have fun playing them to people who want to party with us.”

After forays to the UK and US, the band — Chris, Dan, bassist Tim John and drummer Lachlan West — were itching to record their debut album, signing with American super-indie Wind-Up Records. The only hitch, as it turns out, was writing all the new songs needed for the record. “Yeah,” laughs Chris, “that was a problem. We needed 30 songs, and we had about six.”

A writing retreat at a “hippie meditation cabin in the middle of nowhere” outside of Sydney, Australia, ended in frustration and only a couple of workable songs. “It was really tough,” remembers Chris. “With the touring and being away from loved ones and family, we were going through some personal stuff. The songs weren’t flowing and we started to worry about our abilities as songwriters. Then we went to New York.”

With deadlines looming, NYC provided songwriting panacea. There Chris and Dan hit their stride; in the studio where Tupac Shakur was shot, no less. “It was great,” remembers Dan of Quad Studios, “we finally found our groove. It helped that it was during a polar vortex, meaning we could barely ever go outside in sub-zero temperatures. We just never left the studio; we ended up having fun making these songs because we had to.”

By January 2014, the band were flying to LA, getting in a cab to their hotel, dropping off their bags and then heading directly to meet producer Tony Hoffer (Beck, Foster the People, M83). They instantly hit it off; a planned week of pre-production needed only three days before heading into Hobby Shop Studios to record.

In Hoffer the band found a willing collaborator, “like a member of the band almost immediately”, enthuses Dan. But most importantly, adds Chris, “He was an amazing presence, always challenging whether a lyric or melody or drum line was good enough. He pushed us so far as a band and it meant we could really achieve what we wanted from the songs.”

“Adopted in everything we did”, was the ‘Be Impressive’ ideal says Chris. “We’d spend entire days in the studio only to be up until 4am at our hotel working on and re-writing parts; one chorus we re-wrote 16 times,” he laughs. “It was so much fun though.”

“Yeah; you only get to make one debut album,” says Dan, “and we wanted to make ours as impressive as we possibly could. Working hard and late nights mean nothing when you’re working on something you love. So ‘Be Impressive’ became something we thought about all the time.”

“We got to make a record that’s wild and a bit weird; that’s us in a nutshell,” laughs Chris. “And, y’know, being in the studio with Tony and challenging ourselves every day was the coolest creative experience of our lives.”

“If you wanna stay / I will never miss you while I’m away” 

‘If You Wanna Stay’, ‘16 Years’ and ‘Right on Track’ harness the striking growth in The Griswolds songwriting, with synths and keys playing a prominent role. “We started using synths to add more depth to our sound, and really to capture that dance floor energy,” explains Chris. “But the party flavours are definitely still there, like on (first single) ’Beware the Dog’.”

That sonic evolution is clear, and nowhere more apparent than on ‘Not Ready Anymore’ or ballad ‘Thread the Needle’ — with strings by composer David Campbell (Paul McCartney, The Rolling Stones). Infused with the carefree spirit of youth — helped by Chris’ nieces and nephews on the title-track and hedonistic song ‘Down and Out’ — the album also adds more depth, more honesty, more heartbreak.

“What we found is the songs started to take on our personality,” says Dan. “As we were writing these songs we were growing up, and then as we were recording them our musical tastes were developing into something deeper, and often a bit darker.”

Says Chris, “We wanted to make a fun record that touches on deeper feelings we all have from time to time; that idea of balancing out maturing and wanting to have fun and live life the way you want to. Knowing that growing up can be painful, but those experiences add up to something fun. It’s about that cusp of being a carefree kid and an adult.”

“We are young / And we are free” 

Be Impressive is about growing up, finding your own path and dealing with the challenges that presents. It’s about love and loss; spontaneous happiness and devastating sadness. It covers a wide emotional spectrum; able to soundtrack a crazy road trip with your best friends… or your next ‘we all lost our shirts’ house party… or your next breakup.

The band’s intentions, though, remain as simple as the album’s title. “We’re pretty chilled, relaxed guys, but we take making music seriously. Because the more people we get to play to around the world,” says Chris, “the more we want to keep touring… and keep partying with people who like our music.”

After all, the Be Impressive ethos was a challenge to be true to themselves and make the best record they could. As a result, it’s easy to revel in The Griswolds uncomplicated worldview. “We’re all about melodies, big hooks, choruses you want to singalong to and having lots of fun,” grins Chris.. “That’s what this band, and this album, is all about.”

That’s impressive, alright.

Lolo

→ Official Website

Meet LOLO. The 27-year-old Tennessee-bred, singer that has traveled continents to find her place, only to have found her voice where she had left it: home.

For the past 10 years, LOLO has been working to get to this point. Heard.

At the age of fifteen, having endlessly pestered her parents about her desire to become a recording artist and songwriter, she successfully convinced her mother to move to Los Angeles. “I was writing every day non-stop,” she says. “Just to show them that I was dedicated. It was a huge risk.”

Forced to return to their hometown in the outskirts of Memphis, LOLO’s mother left the young singer in L.A. living with close friend, Riley Keough and her mother, Lisa Marie Presley. At 18, LOLO landed a role in Broadway musical Spring Awakening, originating the rebel character of Ilse, relocating her to New York. “I had to play this bohemian chick that ran away,” she laughs. “I was like, well, that’s pretty true to life.”

In 2010 LOLO, then going by her given name Lauren Pritchard, once again uprooted her life for her craft, moving to London thanks to a record deal offer from Universal/Island Records UK. Her debut album, Wasted In Jackson – a stunning album of southern soul and heartbreak – met small commercial success but was critically praised.

Unwavering in her desire to succeed, LOLO traveled back to the U.S., heading to Brooklyn, NY to work on her sound. Show after show and song after song, she realized something was missing – she couldn’t quiet find herself. With new found determination, LOLO went back to the place where she is her best self and in a full circle moment, everything clicked.  Reveling in her roots back at home, she discovered the voice she’d been dying to share. LOLO’s powerful voice transports you to a hot southern night – rough around the edges but with a velvety quality that soothes the soul.

Currently, she is working on an untitled EP that will be released this summer.

Nov
15
Sun
Nashville Sunday Night Presents: The SteelDrivers @ 3rd and Lindsley
Nov 15 @ 8:00 PM – 10:00 PM

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Right there, at two minutes and ten seconds into the first song, “Long Way Down.” The part where Gary Nichols sings, “Girl, we both know where your soul is bound.” Only he bleeds it as much as he sings it. He sounds murderous, maniacal. Her soul is bound for nothing skyward, for nothing heavenly. And he’s fine with that.

Richard Bailey’s banjo plays funky, little Kentucky-goes-to-Memphis rolls. Tammy Rogers’ fiddle soars. Brent Truitt’s mandolin chops time, and Mike Fleming’s bass pounds the downbeat. And all that is righteous and right-on. Elevated, even. But Nichols—he lets loose something the opposite of righteousness. It’s a howl, full of hurt and anger and life. Starts on the highest E note that 99.9% of male singers can hit, then ascends into a sweet falsetto, and then opens up like the gates of Hell, into a reeling screech.

Nichols is from Muscle Shoals. He grew up as a guitar slinger and a soul shouter, which should not be any help in fronting one of bluegrass music’s most engaging outfits. But part of the reason the SteelDrivers are such an engaging band is the seemingly incongruous blend of soul and slink, blues and country, mountain coal and red dirt.

“I think that’s what moves people when they come to see us: the realness and rawness and edge,” says Rogers, who formed the SteelDrivers in 2005 with Bailey, Fleming, multi-instrumentalist Mike Henderson, and soulful singer (and now-acclaimed contemporary country artist) Chris Stapleton. That version of the SteelDrivers received three GRAMMY® nominations and won an audience that was surprised and initially saddened by the 2010 and 2011 departures of Stapleton and Henderson. But the entries of Nichols and virtuoso mandolin talent Truitt have created a SteelDrivers band that carries the gutbucket ethic of the original combo, but pleases in different ways.

Truitt’s fluid mandolin added another virtuoso element to a group that is undergirded by Fleming’s upright bass and baritone harmonies. In the studio, the band kept pushing the tempo, perhaps to assuage the sadness and, perhaps, because it’s sometimes easier for master musicians to play with reckless abandon than with somber certainty.

Nichols and Isbell played together as teens when Nichols fronted Gulliver, a band that included bass man Jimbo Hart and drummer Ryan Tillery. When Nichols scored a major label deal with Mercury Records in 2006, he hit the road with Hart and Tillery. When Nichols exited Mercury, Hart and Tillery joined Isbell’s 400 Unit band.

Nichols and the SteelDrivers speak in their own accent, one that charms and sears and beguiles. This is a band like no other, by inclination but not by calculation. Nichols, Rogers, Bailey, Fleming, Truitt … Those of us who have listened all know where their souls are bound. Bound to triumph. Bound to rise. Bound to matter. Bound to resound. Bound to impact. Bound to roar and shimmy, to howl and heal. A damn good band, this one. If you don’t believe it, start around two minutes and ten seconds into “Long Way Down.” That’s the stuff, right there.

Dec
6
Sun
Nashville Sunday Night Presents: The Wood Brothers @ 3rd and Lindsley
Dec 6 @ 8:00 PM – 10:00 PM

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The cover of The Wood Brothers’ gorgeous new album, ‘Paradise,’ is adorned with an illustration of a mule staring at a carrot dangling just inches in front of its mouth. The carrot, though, is hanging from a stick affixed to the mule’s own head.

“In some ways, he’s already got it,” explains guitarist Oliver Wood. “And in some ways, he’ll never have it.”

That paradox is at the core of ‘Paradise,’ an album about longing and desire and the ways in which the pursuit of fulfillment can keep it perpetually out of our reach. It’s a beautiful collection, the band’s most sophisticated work to date and also their most rocking, with bassist Chris Wood playing electric on tracks for the first time. Recorded at Dan Auerbach’s Easy Eye studio in Nashville, ‘Paradise’ captures the latest chapter in the ongoing evolution of a band—and a family—navigating the joy and challenges of a life in music.

Dubbed “masters of soulful folk” by Paste, The Wood Brothers released their debut studio album, ‘Ways Not To Lose,’ on Blue Note in 2006. You’d be forgiven at the time for expecting it to be something of a side project. Chris Wood already had legions of devoted fans for his incomparable work as one-third of Medeski Martin & Wood, while his brother Oliver toured with Tinsley Ellis before releasing a half-dozen albums with his band King Johnson. Almost a decade later and with drummer Jano Rix added as a permanent third member, it’s become quite clear that The Wood Brothers is indeed the main act.

‘Paradise’ follows the band’s acclaimed 2013 release ‘The Muse,’ which was recorded almost entirely live around a tree of microphones in Zac Brown’s Southern Ground studio. Hailed previously by the New York Times for their “gripping” vocals and by the LA Times for their “taught musicianship,” the brothers found the live setting to be a remarkable showcase for their live chemistry and charismatic magnetism. But when it came time to record ‘Paradise,’ their fifth studio album, the band knew the music called for a different approach.

“For this album, we wanted to have a more up-close and dry sound,” explains Chris. “I worked on another record at Easy Eye and I just loved the room. Dan’s studio is cool because it’s not old, but it feels that way when you walk into it. It reminds me of Sun Studios. It just has that feeling of a small room with natural compression, and I think you hear that in the sounds on the record.”

The decision to record in Nashville was no coincidence either, as this marks the first album written with the entire band living in Music City.

Dec
7
Mon
Lightning 100 Presents Ryan Bingham with James Revival @ Exit/In
Dec 7 @ 8:00 PM

Lightning 100 Presents:

Ryan Bingham

Jamestown Revival

MON, DECEMBER 7, 2015

DOORS: 8:00 PM / SHOW: 9:00 PM

EXIT/IN

NASHVILLE, TN

$25.00 – $28.00

ON SALE
FRI 8/21
10:00 AM CDT

THIS EVENT IS 18 AND OVER

Absolutely no refunds – no exceptions. Lineups and times are subject to change.
Gov’t issued ID required. No re-entry.

Ryan Bingham

Ryan Bingham

Grammy and Oscar- winning singer/songwriter Ryan Bingham was born in New Mexico but raised all across the Southwestern United States. He set out on his own, at a young age, shuffling from town to town and performing gigs at local no-frills bars. It’s this spirit of having done plenty of living early on, that has informed the singer- songwriters world-weary and jagged, weather-beaten vocals.

At only 34 years of age, Bingham has five studio albums under his belt (‘Mescalito’, ‘Roadhouse Sun’, ‘Junky Star’, ‘Tomorrowland’ & ‘Fear And Saturday Night’) the two most recent of which were released under his own label Axster Bingham Records.

For his 2015 release ‘Fear and Saturday Night’, Bingham needed some peace and quiet, free of the burdens that had saddled him during the writing and recording of his recent albums. Bingham lost both his parents to alcoholism, and parted ways with his former band “The Dead Horses.” He relocated to an old airstream trailer tucked away in the mountains of California, camping out for several weeks and embracing the solitude to dig down deep and craft his most powerful album yet. The album was recorded mostly live, with a brand new backing band and under the guidance of producer/engineer Jim Scott near Bingham’s home in Los Angeles, CA.

In 2015 Bingham will be touring the US and Europe in support of his new album Fear And Saturday Night, in which Bingham faces down his past with a poetic grace throughout. It’s the hard-learned lessons, through both good times and bad, which helped make Bingham the man he is today. Fear and Saturday Night is the most authentic, personal, and deeply moving portrait of that man we’ve heard yet.

Jamestown Revival

Jamestown Revival

Jamestown Revival is an idea formed by Jonathan Clay & Zach Chance. For lack of a better word, it could be called a “duo”, but that just doesn’t quite capture the essence of their delivery. This band is two-man rock & roll, and the closest possible categorization one could label it with would sound something like “indie-rock with a southern slant”. Drawing on influences ranging from The Band, to Simon and Garfunkle, Jamestown Revival’s sound is harmony driven and rooted in southern soul. The two are childhood friends, and the chemistry is evident when seeing them perform. Formed in 2011, the band has already been featured on the Carson Daly Show, as well as Rolling Stone Magazine. With a self-produced EP that reached #9 on the iTunes charts, the duo has criss-crossed the country, playing everywhere from dive bars to amphitheaters.
Dec
11
Fri
Lightning 100 Presents Trombone Shorty and Orleans Avenue @ Marathon Music Works
Dec 11 @ 8:00 PM
Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue

Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue

New Orleans native Trombone Shorty began his career as a bandleader at the young age of six, toured internationally at age 12, and spent his teens playing with various brass bands throughout New Orleans and touring worldwide with Lenny Kravitz. He fronts Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue, a funk/rock/jazz/hip-hop band. Together they have toured across the U.S., Europe, Australia, Russia, Japan and Brazil. In 2010, Trombone Shorty released his debut album, the Grammy®-nominated “Backatown,” followed by “For True” in 2011, which topped Billboard magazine’s Contemporary Jazz Chart for 12 weeks. His newest album, “Say That to This,” was released in 2013 and features funk/jazz elements of New Orleans. Trombone Shorty appeared in several episodes of HBO’s “Treme,” and has recently appeared on “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, Jimmy Kimmel Live,” “Late Night with Jimmy Fallon” and “Conan.” In 2012, he performed at the White House in honor of Black History Month with music royalty such as B.B. King, Mick Jagger, Jeff Beck and Booker T. Jones. At this year’s Grammy Awards, he performed alongside Madonna, Macklemore & Ryan Lewis, and Mary Lambert. In 2012, he received the President’s Medal from Tulane University in recognition of his charitable work with the Trombone Shorty Foundation, which donates quality instruments to schools across New Orleans.
Dec
13
Sun
Lightning 100 Presents City and Colour with Bahamas @ War Memorial Auditorium
Dec 13 @ 8:00 PM – 11:00 PM

City and Colour with Bahamas will be at War Memorial Auditorium – December 13, 2015 at 8:00 p.m.

War Memorial Auditorium and AEG Live / The Messina Group are pleased to announce that City and Colour will bring his tug-at-the-gut ballads, new southern-swept soul, and punk rock roots to Nashville on December 13 with special guest Bahamas.

In support of his fifth release, If I Should Go Before You, out October 9, City & Colour says “Anybody who has seen us play will understand that this is the best representation of what we do live that we have ever recorded.”  For Dallas Green’s forthcoming album (released as City and Colour), he returned to Blackbird Studios in Nashville, which has become a special refuge – “In Toronto, I think of what I have to do,” he says.  “In Nashville, I think of everything I have done.”

*All ticket prices increase by $5 day of show.

Feb
26
Fri
Gary Clark Jr @ Ryman Auditorium
Feb 26 @ 8:00 PM – 11:00 PM

Gary Clark Jr.

Friday, February 26, 2016
8:00 PM
$39.50 & $34.50
On Sale Friday, August 7 at 10 AM
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To sum up Gary Clark Jr. is more challenging every day. He’s a musical universe unto himself, expanding at a nearly immeasurable rate, ever more hard to define — as a mind-blowing guitarist, a dazzling songwriter and engagingly soulful singer.

With his debut album Blak And Blu he has just become the first artist ever recognized by the Recording Academy with Grammy Award nominations in both the rock and R&B categories for the same album in the same year, winning the latter: Best Traditional R&B Performance  – Please Come Home (from the album Blak And Blu). And the day after claiming those honors he provided one of the highlights of the highlights-filled “The Night That Changed America: A Grammy Salute to the Beatles,” with sparks flying as he dueled with Joe Walsh on an incendiary “While My Guitar Gently Weeps,” Dave Grohl behind them pounding the drums.

But that barely scratches the surface. The album’s a rocket ride from the Mississippi Delta of a century ago to multiple points still out beyond the horizon. Rock and R&B sure, but blues, soul, pop, psychedelia, punk and hip-hop are also in Clark’s expansive musical embrace and insatiable hunger for inspiration, which he’s internalized into music all his own. And his two acoustic blues performances on the soundtrack album for the acclaimed movie 12 Years a Slave show the distinct talent and personality he brings to his music.

That, in turn, has been inspirational to others — including some who inspired him. Just ask Eric Clapton, the Rolling Stones, Paul McCartney, Jay-Z, Jimmy Page, Alicia Keys, the Roots, Buddy guy, Dave Matthews, Roger Waters, Keith Urban, Sheryl Crow, Jeff Beck, among the many who hailed his arrival as a major talent and cherished chances to perform with him. It’s no accident that he was invited to make more “special guest” appearances on the Stones’ recent 50th anniversary tour than any other artist, including the concluding Hyde Park blowout in which he and band also were the opening act.

Or ask President Barak Obama himself, who seeing Clark command the stage of the PBS White House concert honoring the blues — with Jagger, Beck, B.B. King and Buddy Guy among the veterans performing — declared of the young man, “He’s the future.”

Rolling Stone dubbed Clark “The King of the Summer Festivals” as he captivated audiences from Coachella to Glastonbury, Lollapalooza to the New Orleans Jazz &  Heritage Festival, from Metallica’s Orion Festival to Jay-Z’s Made in America, and of course his hometown Austin City Limits Festival, where he his band set a daytime attendance record. He’s dominated late night and daytime TV with multiple appearances on Leno, Letterman, Kimmel, Conan, Fallon, Arsenio Hall, Queen Latifah, Today, CBS This Morning and so on. Guitar Playermagazine made him the first emerging artist to grace its cover in more than 15 years. Rolling Stone proclaimed him no less than “The Chosen One.”

It’s a lot to live up to, but through it all his musical ambition and reach continue to grow. New songs he’s previewed to delighted audiences show him exploring ever further combinations of sounds and styles, all with his distinct stamp.

A man of few words, he’s quietly grateful that the music he makes his way has connected with so many. “To think a weird idea I noodled on at the house has gone to something 40,000 people might hear at a festival is an indescribable feeling,” he told Esquire recently. “As cool as I might try to be, I think, ‘Oh my God, this is real!’”

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