Nashville Events

Sep
5
Sat
Musicians Corner: Marc Broussard The McCrary Sisters​ ​ Matthew Perryman Jones Castro
Sep 5 all-day

Our Fall 2015 Season takes place September 5 to October 31.

Musicians Corner, a program of The Conservancy for the Parthenon and Centennial Park, presents free weekly lawn parties in Nashville’s Centennial Park on Saturday afternoons in May, June, September and October.

Follow us on Twitter: @muscornernash
Follow us on Instagram: /MusCornerNash
Learn more and get performance schedules at www.musicianscornernashville.com

Musicians Corner is a program of The Conservancy for the Parthenon and Centennial Park, a 5019c)(3) nonprofit organization.

Rapture, Blister, Burn @ Andrew Johnson Theater
Sep 5 all-day

rapture-blister-burn-3Blister, Burn

Appropriate audience: High school and above.

Dates:Previews: Sept 3-4, 2015
Regular Run: Sept 5-19, 2015

Location:   Johnson Theater, TPAC

Purchase Tickets by Phone:

Nashville Repertory Theatre’s production of Rapture, Blister, Burn by Gina Gionfriddo. Live onstage at Tennessee Performing Arts Center’s (TPAC) Johnson Theater, September 5–19, 2015 with previews September 3–4.

Friends Catherine and Gwen reunite after more than a decade apart when Catherine returns home to care for her mother. Catherine has had a dazzling career as a high-profile author while Gwen chose to raise a family—after marrying the man Catherine gave up to pursue her goals. As they catch up, each woman begins to covet the other’s life and question her own path. The New York Times calls this Pulitzer Prize-nominated play “intensely smart, immensely funny” as it explores life choices in the wake of 20th century feminist ideals.

   RENÉ ON RAPTURE, BLISTER, BURN

This is a great new play, launched at Playwrights Horizon in NYC and recently off a hot run at the Goodman in Chicago. It was nominated for a Pulitzer in 2013, and is written by a playwright I already admired (we were seriously considering her Becky Shaw a couple of years ago). Reviews all say stuff like: “With searing insight and trademark wit, this comedy is an unflinching look at gender politics in the wake of 20th century feminist ideals.” In the play, Catherine is a professor and successful published author who gave up her college boyfriend to pursue her work and has not yet married. Gwen, a college friend, married Catherine’s ex-boyfriend and had the family and children. Circumstances throw these old college friends back together, and sparks fly. The New York Times said: “Ms. Gionfriddo’s play does not really present Gwen and Catherine’s lives as two sides of the same tarnished, useless coin. What’s exciting about her writing here is the multiplicity of the ideas it engages. Heady with sharp-witted dialogue about the particularities of women’s experience (there’s a joke about pornography and Google maps — believe it or not — that’s worth the ticket price alone), ‘Rapture’ more largely illuminates how hard it can be to forge both a satisfying career and a fulfilling personal life in an era that seems to demand superhuman achievement from everyone.” This play reminds me a little of Clybourne Park, not in content, but in its combination of bringing the funny while being intensely smart and thoroughly thought-provoking. It has 5 roles, and 4 of them are really kick-ass female roles that we can cast brilliantly out of our talent pool. Not only am I tickled to present a play written by a female playwright, but the number of strong female roles will help balance the highly-male cast of the famous classic on the season. This play made me laugh out loud, but asked questions about the choices we make in life that were also somewhat uncomfortable. I’m pleased to tell you that our previous artistic associate Lauren Shouse, who directed a couple of shows for us while on staff here as well as for other theatre companies in town, is fresh off completing her MFA in directing from Northwestern and will come back and guest direct.

Sep
6
Sun
Nashville Sunday Night Presents: The Dead Deads with Hillbilly Casino @ 3rd and Lindsley
Sep 6 @ 8:00 PM – 10:00 PM

Artist

A supergroup formed from members of The Wolf Sisters, PRIM! and Catfight in the summer of 2013, this powerhouse of live performance is based in Nashville, Tennessee. The musical influences of the group vary from girl to girl, but the common thread is drum-based rock bands like The Melvins, The Foo Fighters and Torche. Audiences may be curious as they see five girls with X’s over their eyes set up amps and tune guitars, but once the wall of sound washes over them, they forget who they were there to see and are spirited away into the dark and magical world of The Dead Deads.

The Dead Deads live show is high-energy, dark and fun. Pink smoke (when allowed by venue) floats from the stage as metal riffs are blended with doo-wop harmonies and classic pop sensibilities to create a new brand of rock–brutal, silly and sublime. The Dead Deads are for fans of everything from 90’s girl bands like The Breeders to modern metal bands like Mastadon, to alternative rock bands like The Foo Fighters or even Weezer.  The Dead Deads bring the rock, in its many forms, and live music fans are jumping on the bandwagon in droves.

In December 2014 they wrapped their first national tour with Halestorm, dramatically growing their fanbase through their wild live show and insidious charm at meet and greets. Their debut full-length record “Rainbeau” produced by Brian Carter at Paradox and mixed by Matt Mahaffey/sElf was recorded live to tape in three days and released in November to rave reviews calling the album, “the weirdest wonderland of accessible punk and rock you’ve heard in awhile,” and “one of the better albums of the year.”

Spring 2015 finds the girls hard at work on a new record, with a scheduled teaser EP release in summer 2015, and the full album slated for the end of 2015.  Look for The Dead Deads on the road this summer or on the high seas where they will be ripping alongside their heroes on Motorhead’s Motorboat, and the ShipRocked Cruise in January 2016.

Sep
8
Tue
Rapture, Blister, Burn @ Andrew Johnson Theater
Sep 8 all-day

rapture-blister-burn-3Blister, Burn

Appropriate audience: High school and above.

Dates:Previews: Sept 3-4, 2015
Regular Run: Sept 5-19, 2015

Location:   Johnson Theater, TPAC

Purchase Tickets by Phone:

Nashville Repertory Theatre’s production of Rapture, Blister, Burn by Gina Gionfriddo. Live onstage at Tennessee Performing Arts Center’s (TPAC) Johnson Theater, September 5–19, 2015 with previews September 3–4.

Friends Catherine and Gwen reunite after more than a decade apart when Catherine returns home to care for her mother. Catherine has had a dazzling career as a high-profile author while Gwen chose to raise a family—after marrying the man Catherine gave up to pursue her goals. As they catch up, each woman begins to covet the other’s life and question her own path. The New York Times calls this Pulitzer Prize-nominated play “intensely smart, immensely funny” as it explores life choices in the wake of 20th century feminist ideals.

   RENÉ ON RAPTURE, BLISTER, BURN

This is a great new play, launched at Playwrights Horizon in NYC and recently off a hot run at the Goodman in Chicago. It was nominated for a Pulitzer in 2013, and is written by a playwright I already admired (we were seriously considering her Becky Shaw a couple of years ago). Reviews all say stuff like: “With searing insight and trademark wit, this comedy is an unflinching look at gender politics in the wake of 20th century feminist ideals.” In the play, Catherine is a professor and successful published author who gave up her college boyfriend to pursue her work and has not yet married. Gwen, a college friend, married Catherine’s ex-boyfriend and had the family and children. Circumstances throw these old college friends back together, and sparks fly. The New York Times said: “Ms. Gionfriddo’s play does not really present Gwen and Catherine’s lives as two sides of the same tarnished, useless coin. What’s exciting about her writing here is the multiplicity of the ideas it engages. Heady with sharp-witted dialogue about the particularities of women’s experience (there’s a joke about pornography and Google maps — believe it or not — that’s worth the ticket price alone), ‘Rapture’ more largely illuminates how hard it can be to forge both a satisfying career and a fulfilling personal life in an era that seems to demand superhuman achievement from everyone.” This play reminds me a little of Clybourne Park, not in content, but in its combination of bringing the funny while being intensely smart and thoroughly thought-provoking. It has 5 roles, and 4 of them are really kick-ass female roles that we can cast brilliantly out of our talent pool. Not only am I tickled to present a play written by a female playwright, but the number of strong female roles will help balance the highly-male cast of the famous classic on the season. This play made me laugh out loud, but asked questions about the choices we make in life that were also somewhat uncomfortable. I’m pleased to tell you that our previous artistic associate Lauren Shouse, who directed a couple of shows for us while on staff here as well as for other theatre companies in town, is fresh off completing her MFA in directing from Northwestern and will come back and guest direct.

Sep
9
Wed
Rapture, Blister, Burn @ Andrew Johnson Theater
Sep 9 all-day

rapture-blister-burn-3Blister, Burn

Appropriate audience: High school and above.

Dates:Previews: Sept 3-4, 2015
Regular Run: Sept 5-19, 2015

Location:   Johnson Theater, TPAC

Purchase Tickets by Phone:

Nashville Repertory Theatre’s production of Rapture, Blister, Burn by Gina Gionfriddo. Live onstage at Tennessee Performing Arts Center’s (TPAC) Johnson Theater, September 5–19, 2015 with previews September 3–4.

Friends Catherine and Gwen reunite after more than a decade apart when Catherine returns home to care for her mother. Catherine has had a dazzling career as a high-profile author while Gwen chose to raise a family—after marrying the man Catherine gave up to pursue her goals. As they catch up, each woman begins to covet the other’s life and question her own path. The New York Times calls this Pulitzer Prize-nominated play “intensely smart, immensely funny” as it explores life choices in the wake of 20th century feminist ideals.

   RENÉ ON RAPTURE, BLISTER, BURN

This is a great new play, launched at Playwrights Horizon in NYC and recently off a hot run at the Goodman in Chicago. It was nominated for a Pulitzer in 2013, and is written by a playwright I already admired (we were seriously considering her Becky Shaw a couple of years ago). Reviews all say stuff like: “With searing insight and trademark wit, this comedy is an unflinching look at gender politics in the wake of 20th century feminist ideals.” In the play, Catherine is a professor and successful published author who gave up her college boyfriend to pursue her work and has not yet married. Gwen, a college friend, married Catherine’s ex-boyfriend and had the family and children. Circumstances throw these old college friends back together, and sparks fly. The New York Times said: “Ms. Gionfriddo’s play does not really present Gwen and Catherine’s lives as two sides of the same tarnished, useless coin. What’s exciting about her writing here is the multiplicity of the ideas it engages. Heady with sharp-witted dialogue about the particularities of women’s experience (there’s a joke about pornography and Google maps — believe it or not — that’s worth the ticket price alone), ‘Rapture’ more largely illuminates how hard it can be to forge both a satisfying career and a fulfilling personal life in an era that seems to demand superhuman achievement from everyone.” This play reminds me a little of Clybourne Park, not in content, but in its combination of bringing the funny while being intensely smart and thoroughly thought-provoking. It has 5 roles, and 4 of them are really kick-ass female roles that we can cast brilliantly out of our talent pool. Not only am I tickled to present a play written by a female playwright, but the number of strong female roles will help balance the highly-male cast of the famous classic on the season. This play made me laugh out loud, but asked questions about the choices we make in life that were also somewhat uncomfortable. I’m pleased to tell you that our previous artistic associate Lauren Shouse, who directed a couple of shows for us while on staff here as well as for other theatre companies in town, is fresh off completing her MFA in directing from Northwestern and will come back and guest direct.

Sep
10
Thu
Rapture, Blister, Burn @ Andrew Johnson Theater
Sep 10 all-day

rapture-blister-burn-3Blister, Burn

Appropriate audience: High school and above.

Dates:Previews: Sept 3-4, 2015
Regular Run: Sept 5-19, 2015

Location:   Johnson Theater, TPAC

Purchase Tickets by Phone:

Nashville Repertory Theatre’s production of Rapture, Blister, Burn by Gina Gionfriddo. Live onstage at Tennessee Performing Arts Center’s (TPAC) Johnson Theater, September 5–19, 2015 with previews September 3–4.

Friends Catherine and Gwen reunite after more than a decade apart when Catherine returns home to care for her mother. Catherine has had a dazzling career as a high-profile author while Gwen chose to raise a family—after marrying the man Catherine gave up to pursue her goals. As they catch up, each woman begins to covet the other’s life and question her own path. The New York Times calls this Pulitzer Prize-nominated play “intensely smart, immensely funny” as it explores life choices in the wake of 20th century feminist ideals.

   RENÉ ON RAPTURE, BLISTER, BURN

This is a great new play, launched at Playwrights Horizon in NYC and recently off a hot run at the Goodman in Chicago. It was nominated for a Pulitzer in 2013, and is written by a playwright I already admired (we were seriously considering her Becky Shaw a couple of years ago). Reviews all say stuff like: “With searing insight and trademark wit, this comedy is an unflinching look at gender politics in the wake of 20th century feminist ideals.” In the play, Catherine is a professor and successful published author who gave up her college boyfriend to pursue her work and has not yet married. Gwen, a college friend, married Catherine’s ex-boyfriend and had the family and children. Circumstances throw these old college friends back together, and sparks fly. The New York Times said: “Ms. Gionfriddo’s play does not really present Gwen and Catherine’s lives as two sides of the same tarnished, useless coin. What’s exciting about her writing here is the multiplicity of the ideas it engages. Heady with sharp-witted dialogue about the particularities of women’s experience (there’s a joke about pornography and Google maps — believe it or not — that’s worth the ticket price alone), ‘Rapture’ more largely illuminates how hard it can be to forge both a satisfying career and a fulfilling personal life in an era that seems to demand superhuman achievement from everyone.” This play reminds me a little of Clybourne Park, not in content, but in its combination of bringing the funny while being intensely smart and thoroughly thought-provoking. It has 5 roles, and 4 of them are really kick-ass female roles that we can cast brilliantly out of our talent pool. Not only am I tickled to present a play written by a female playwright, but the number of strong female roles will help balance the highly-male cast of the famous classic on the season. This play made me laugh out loud, but asked questions about the choices we make in life that were also somewhat uncomfortable. I’m pleased to tell you that our previous artistic associate Lauren Shouse, who directed a couple of shows for us while on staff here as well as for other theatre companies in town, is fresh off completing her MFA in directing from Northwestern and will come back and guest direct.

Lightning 100’s Live On The Green Music Festival: RODRIGO Y GABRIELA, JD MCPHERSON, HUMMING HOUSE, DELTA RAE, KOPECKY, CIVIL TWILIGHT @ Public Square Park
Sep 10 @ 5:00 PM – 11:00 PM
Live On The Green After Party @ ACME Feed and Seed
Sep 10 @ 11:00 PM

good-life4-big

Event Details: 21+ / Free / 11:00pm – 2:00am

Genre: Dance / After-Party

Come party on the 1st floor with us and DJ Rate after LOTG

Sep
11
Fri
Rapture, Blister, Burn @ Andrew Johnson Theater
Sep 11 all-day

rapture-blister-burn-3Blister, Burn

Appropriate audience: High school and above.

Dates:Previews: Sept 3-4, 2015
Regular Run: Sept 5-19, 2015

Location:   Johnson Theater, TPAC

Purchase Tickets by Phone:

Nashville Repertory Theatre’s production of Rapture, Blister, Burn by Gina Gionfriddo. Live onstage at Tennessee Performing Arts Center’s (TPAC) Johnson Theater, September 5–19, 2015 with previews September 3–4.

Friends Catherine and Gwen reunite after more than a decade apart when Catherine returns home to care for her mother. Catherine has had a dazzling career as a high-profile author while Gwen chose to raise a family—after marrying the man Catherine gave up to pursue her goals. As they catch up, each woman begins to covet the other’s life and question her own path. The New York Times calls this Pulitzer Prize-nominated play “intensely smart, immensely funny” as it explores life choices in the wake of 20th century feminist ideals.

   RENÉ ON RAPTURE, BLISTER, BURN

This is a great new play, launched at Playwrights Horizon in NYC and recently off a hot run at the Goodman in Chicago. It was nominated for a Pulitzer in 2013, and is written by a playwright I already admired (we were seriously considering her Becky Shaw a couple of years ago). Reviews all say stuff like: “With searing insight and trademark wit, this comedy is an unflinching look at gender politics in the wake of 20th century feminist ideals.” In the play, Catherine is a professor and successful published author who gave up her college boyfriend to pursue her work and has not yet married. Gwen, a college friend, married Catherine’s ex-boyfriend and had the family and children. Circumstances throw these old college friends back together, and sparks fly. The New York Times said: “Ms. Gionfriddo’s play does not really present Gwen and Catherine’s lives as two sides of the same tarnished, useless coin. What’s exciting about her writing here is the multiplicity of the ideas it engages. Heady with sharp-witted dialogue about the particularities of women’s experience (there’s a joke about pornography and Google maps — believe it or not — that’s worth the ticket price alone), ‘Rapture’ more largely illuminates how hard it can be to forge both a satisfying career and a fulfilling personal life in an era that seems to demand superhuman achievement from everyone.” This play reminds me a little of Clybourne Park, not in content, but in its combination of bringing the funny while being intensely smart and thoroughly thought-provoking. It has 5 roles, and 4 of them are really kick-ass female roles that we can cast brilliantly out of our talent pool. Not only am I tickled to present a play written by a female playwright, but the number of strong female roles will help balance the highly-male cast of the famous classic on the season. This play made me laugh out loud, but asked questions about the choices we make in life that were also somewhat uncomfortable. I’m pleased to tell you that our previous artistic associate Lauren Shouse, who directed a couple of shows for us while on staff here as well as for other theatre companies in town, is fresh off completing her MFA in directing from Northwestern and will come back and guest direct.

Lightning 100’s Live On The Green Music Festival: PASSION PIT, BIG DATA, ZELLA DAY, MUSIC CITY MAYHEM WINNER TBA, TURBO FRUITS, ARTIST TBA, ARTIST TBA @ Public Square Park
Sep 11 @ 5:00 PM – 11:00 PM
Live On The Green After Party @ ACME Feed and Seed
Sep 11 @ 11:00 PM

good-life4-big

Event Details: 21+ / Free / 11:00pm – 2:00am

Genre: Dance / After-Party

Come party on the 1st floor with us and DJ Rate after LOTG

Sep
12
Sat
Rapture, Blister, Burn @ Andrew Johnson Theater
Sep 12 all-day

rapture-blister-burn-3Blister, Burn

Appropriate audience: High school and above.

Dates:Previews: Sept 3-4, 2015
Regular Run: Sept 5-19, 2015

Location:   Johnson Theater, TPAC

Purchase Tickets by Phone:

Nashville Repertory Theatre’s production of Rapture, Blister, Burn by Gina Gionfriddo. Live onstage at Tennessee Performing Arts Center’s (TPAC) Johnson Theater, September 5–19, 2015 with previews September 3–4.

Friends Catherine and Gwen reunite after more than a decade apart when Catherine returns home to care for her mother. Catherine has had a dazzling career as a high-profile author while Gwen chose to raise a family—after marrying the man Catherine gave up to pursue her goals. As they catch up, each woman begins to covet the other’s life and question her own path. The New York Times calls this Pulitzer Prize-nominated play “intensely smart, immensely funny” as it explores life choices in the wake of 20th century feminist ideals.

   RENÉ ON RAPTURE, BLISTER, BURN

This is a great new play, launched at Playwrights Horizon in NYC and recently off a hot run at the Goodman in Chicago. It was nominated for a Pulitzer in 2013, and is written by a playwright I already admired (we were seriously considering her Becky Shaw a couple of years ago). Reviews all say stuff like: “With searing insight and trademark wit, this comedy is an unflinching look at gender politics in the wake of 20th century feminist ideals.” In the play, Catherine is a professor and successful published author who gave up her college boyfriend to pursue her work and has not yet married. Gwen, a college friend, married Catherine’s ex-boyfriend and had the family and children. Circumstances throw these old college friends back together, and sparks fly. The New York Times said: “Ms. Gionfriddo’s play does not really present Gwen and Catherine’s lives as two sides of the same tarnished, useless coin. What’s exciting about her writing here is the multiplicity of the ideas it engages. Heady with sharp-witted dialogue about the particularities of women’s experience (there’s a joke about pornography and Google maps — believe it or not — that’s worth the ticket price alone), ‘Rapture’ more largely illuminates how hard it can be to forge both a satisfying career and a fulfilling personal life in an era that seems to demand superhuman achievement from everyone.” This play reminds me a little of Clybourne Park, not in content, but in its combination of bringing the funny while being intensely smart and thoroughly thought-provoking. It has 5 roles, and 4 of them are really kick-ass female roles that we can cast brilliantly out of our talent pool. Not only am I tickled to present a play written by a female playwright, but the number of strong female roles will help balance the highly-male cast of the famous classic on the season. This play made me laugh out loud, but asked questions about the choices we make in life that were also somewhat uncomfortable. I’m pleased to tell you that our previous artistic associate Lauren Shouse, who directed a couple of shows for us while on staff here as well as for other theatre companies in town, is fresh off completing her MFA in directing from Northwestern and will come back and guest direct.

Tennessee Volkfest @ Nashville Farmers Market
Sep 12 – Sep 13 all-day
web-poster
Tennessee Volksfest @ Nashville Farmers Market for 2 Weekends.
September 12th & 13th & 19th & 20th. Gates @ 11am
FREE
Kid & Dog Friendly
The Tennessee Volksfest is back, and excited to return for not one but TWO big weekends at the Nashville Farmers Market. Come out and enjoy Nashville’s only true Munich style Oktoberfest. Enjoy half liters of German beers, bratwurst, hot pretzels, and a variety of great German foods. Plus, there will be live music, games, and fun for all ages.
http://www.tennesseevolksfest.com/
9th Annual Cumberland River Compact Dragon Boat Festival @ Riverfront Park
Sep 12 @ 8:00 AM – 5:30 PM

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The dragons are coming! Get ready for the 9th Annual Cumberland River Compact Dragon Boat Festival, Nashville’s premiere river event.

On Saturday, September 12, 2015, at Riverfront Park, you can take the ride of your life with 50 teams on the Cumberland River in downtown Nashville right in front of LP Field. Thousands of spectators will join you in a large viewing area where they can cheer paddlers, support the advocacy work of the Cumberland River Compact, and celebrate the long tradition of dragon boat racing with a cultural festival unlike any other in Music City.

All of the festivities are within walking distance to the city’s top restaurants, souvenir shops, and downtown Music City attractions. Bring the whole family and plan on spending the day.

Dragon boat racing is one of the fastest growing sport in the world and, without a doubt, the most fun, unique cultural event you’ll experience, thanks to its adrenaline-pumping action. Dragon boat racing grows in popularity each year, with more than 50 million people in 63 countries participating. Teams of 20 paddlers, a drummer and a steersperson race in authentic Hong Kong-style, 46-foot-long dragon boats. All ages, skill levels and physiques can paddle and compete, making it the ultimate team building sport, requiring synchronicity and finesse, more than power to win.

Find out why you can’t miss this event. Bring your Team. Bring your Spirit. Bring your best.

For more information, contact Carolyn Wright at 615-837-1151 or email her at Carolyn.Wright[AT]CumberlandRiverCompact[DOT]org.

Nashville Mini Maker Fair @ Adventure Science Center
Sep 12 @ 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM
WANT TO ATTEND THE MAKER FAIRE AND MAKE A DONATION TO SUPPORT THIS ONE-OF-A-KIND FESTIVAL?
MAKE A GIFT TO OUR INDIEGOGO CAMPAIGN TODAY. CLICK HERE»

MF2015_webheader

Saturday, September 12  |  10 a.m. to 5 p.m

Join us in celebration of makers, hackers, tinkerers, inventors and dreamers. The event is like a big science fair or a community “show & tell” where people will demonstrate their do-it-yourself skills and showcase a wide variety of projects. Nashville Mini Maker Faire is an outdoor (rain or shine) event that people of all ages will enjoy.

Tickets to the Faire are $5 for adults and $2 for youth (18 and under).*

PURCHASE TICKETS

*General admission tickets to the Science Center on Saturday, Sept. 12, will include the price of admission to the Faire.
Members enjoy free admission to the Science Center, but Maker Faire charges still apply.

 

Get updates on the event by visiting the official Facebook page.

Interested in sponsoring the event? Email us for more info.

Lightning 100’s Kids Music Fest at Live On The Green @ Public Square Park
Sep 12 @ 1:00 PM – 2:30 PM

Love taking your kids to Lightning 100’s Live On The Green? Lightning 100 will have a very special Kids Music Fest just for your little ones on the final day of the festival, September 12th!

Mr. Steve the Music Man will be performing at Lightning 100’s Kids Music Fest at Live On The Green along with friends and fellow local musicians Alanna and Jared from Alanna Royale, Daniel Ellsworth & The Great Lakes and Gabe Dixon, & Bill Eberle.

Hear smash hits like “Green Means Go” and classics like “Sharing is Caring!”

But that’s not all, the Nashville Symphony will bring an instrument petting zoo. Princesses will be signing autographs and face painting courtesy of Enchanted Entertainment, and NashvilleFunforFamilies.com will be giving  away popsicles!

Saturday the 12th is a great day to come out and bring the kids to Lightning 100’s Live On The Green Music Fest!

Lightning 100’s Live On The Green Music Festival: BEN FOLDS, HEADLINER TBA, ARTIST TBA, ELLE KING, ALL THEM WITCHES, LENNON & MAISY, THE DISTRICTS, ANDERSON EAST, KALEO, FUTURE THIEVES, ARTIST TBA, MR. STEVE, @ Public Square Park
Sep 12 @ 1:00 PM – 11:00 PM
Live On The Green After Party @ ACME Feed and Seed
Sep 12 @ 11:00 PM

good-life4-big

Event Details: 21+ / Free / 11:00pm – 2:00am

Genre: Dance / After-Party

Come party on the 1st floor with us and DJ Rate after LOTG

Sep
15
Tue
Rapture, Blister, Burn @ Andrew Johnson Theater
Sep 15 all-day

rapture-blister-burn-3Blister, Burn

Appropriate audience: High school and above.

Dates:Previews: Sept 3-4, 2015
Regular Run: Sept 5-19, 2015

Location:   Johnson Theater, TPAC

Purchase Tickets by Phone:

Nashville Repertory Theatre’s production of Rapture, Blister, Burn by Gina Gionfriddo. Live onstage at Tennessee Performing Arts Center’s (TPAC) Johnson Theater, September 5–19, 2015 with previews September 3–4.

Friends Catherine and Gwen reunite after more than a decade apart when Catherine returns home to care for her mother. Catherine has had a dazzling career as a high-profile author while Gwen chose to raise a family—after marrying the man Catherine gave up to pursue her goals. As they catch up, each woman begins to covet the other’s life and question her own path. The New York Times calls this Pulitzer Prize-nominated play “intensely smart, immensely funny” as it explores life choices in the wake of 20th century feminist ideals.

   RENÉ ON RAPTURE, BLISTER, BURN

This is a great new play, launched at Playwrights Horizon in NYC and recently off a hot run at the Goodman in Chicago. It was nominated for a Pulitzer in 2013, and is written by a playwright I already admired (we were seriously considering her Becky Shaw a couple of years ago). Reviews all say stuff like: “With searing insight and trademark wit, this comedy is an unflinching look at gender politics in the wake of 20th century feminist ideals.” In the play, Catherine is a professor and successful published author who gave up her college boyfriend to pursue her work and has not yet married. Gwen, a college friend, married Catherine’s ex-boyfriend and had the family and children. Circumstances throw these old college friends back together, and sparks fly. The New York Times said: “Ms. Gionfriddo’s play does not really present Gwen and Catherine’s lives as two sides of the same tarnished, useless coin. What’s exciting about her writing here is the multiplicity of the ideas it engages. Heady with sharp-witted dialogue about the particularities of women’s experience (there’s a joke about pornography and Google maps — believe it or not — that’s worth the ticket price alone), ‘Rapture’ more largely illuminates how hard it can be to forge both a satisfying career and a fulfilling personal life in an era that seems to demand superhuman achievement from everyone.” This play reminds me a little of Clybourne Park, not in content, but in its combination of bringing the funny while being intensely smart and thoroughly thought-provoking. It has 5 roles, and 4 of them are really kick-ass female roles that we can cast brilliantly out of our talent pool. Not only am I tickled to present a play written by a female playwright, but the number of strong female roles will help balance the highly-male cast of the famous classic on the season. This play made me laugh out loud, but asked questions about the choices we make in life that were also somewhat uncomfortable. I’m pleased to tell you that our previous artistic associate Lauren Shouse, who directed a couple of shows for us while on staff here as well as for other theatre companies in town, is fresh off completing her MFA in directing from Northwestern and will come back and guest direct.

Sep
16
Wed
Rapture, Blister, Burn @ Andrew Johnson Theater
Sep 16 all-day

rapture-blister-burn-3Blister, Burn

Appropriate audience: High school and above.

Dates:Previews: Sept 3-4, 2015
Regular Run: Sept 5-19, 2015

Location:   Johnson Theater, TPAC

Purchase Tickets by Phone:

Nashville Repertory Theatre’s production of Rapture, Blister, Burn by Gina Gionfriddo. Live onstage at Tennessee Performing Arts Center’s (TPAC) Johnson Theater, September 5–19, 2015 with previews September 3–4.

Friends Catherine and Gwen reunite after more than a decade apart when Catherine returns home to care for her mother. Catherine has had a dazzling career as a high-profile author while Gwen chose to raise a family—after marrying the man Catherine gave up to pursue her goals. As they catch up, each woman begins to covet the other’s life and question her own path. The New York Times calls this Pulitzer Prize-nominated play “intensely smart, immensely funny” as it explores life choices in the wake of 20th century feminist ideals.

   RENÉ ON RAPTURE, BLISTER, BURN

This is a great new play, launched at Playwrights Horizon in NYC and recently off a hot run at the Goodman in Chicago. It was nominated for a Pulitzer in 2013, and is written by a playwright I already admired (we were seriously considering her Becky Shaw a couple of years ago). Reviews all say stuff like: “With searing insight and trademark wit, this comedy is an unflinching look at gender politics in the wake of 20th century feminist ideals.” In the play, Catherine is a professor and successful published author who gave up her college boyfriend to pursue her work and has not yet married. Gwen, a college friend, married Catherine’s ex-boyfriend and had the family and children. Circumstances throw these old college friends back together, and sparks fly. The New York Times said: “Ms. Gionfriddo’s play does not really present Gwen and Catherine’s lives as two sides of the same tarnished, useless coin. What’s exciting about her writing here is the multiplicity of the ideas it engages. Heady with sharp-witted dialogue about the particularities of women’s experience (there’s a joke about pornography and Google maps — believe it or not — that’s worth the ticket price alone), ‘Rapture’ more largely illuminates how hard it can be to forge both a satisfying career and a fulfilling personal life in an era that seems to demand superhuman achievement from everyone.” This play reminds me a little of Clybourne Park, not in content, but in its combination of bringing the funny while being intensely smart and thoroughly thought-provoking. It has 5 roles, and 4 of them are really kick-ass female roles that we can cast brilliantly out of our talent pool. Not only am I tickled to present a play written by a female playwright, but the number of strong female roles will help balance the highly-male cast of the famous classic on the season. This play made me laugh out loud, but asked questions about the choices we make in life that were also somewhat uncomfortable. I’m pleased to tell you that our previous artistic associate Lauren Shouse, who directed a couple of shows for us while on staff here as well as for other theatre companies in town, is fresh off completing her MFA in directing from Northwestern and will come back and guest direct.

Sep
17
Thu
Rapture, Blister, Burn @ Andrew Johnson Theater
Sep 17 all-day

rapture-blister-burn-3Blister, Burn

Appropriate audience: High school and above.

Dates:Previews: Sept 3-4, 2015
Regular Run: Sept 5-19, 2015

Location:   Johnson Theater, TPAC

Purchase Tickets by Phone:

Nashville Repertory Theatre’s production of Rapture, Blister, Burn by Gina Gionfriddo. Live onstage at Tennessee Performing Arts Center’s (TPAC) Johnson Theater, September 5–19, 2015 with previews September 3–4.

Friends Catherine and Gwen reunite after more than a decade apart when Catherine returns home to care for her mother. Catherine has had a dazzling career as a high-profile author while Gwen chose to raise a family—after marrying the man Catherine gave up to pursue her goals. As they catch up, each woman begins to covet the other’s life and question her own path. The New York Times calls this Pulitzer Prize-nominated play “intensely smart, immensely funny” as it explores life choices in the wake of 20th century feminist ideals.

   RENÉ ON RAPTURE, BLISTER, BURN

This is a great new play, launched at Playwrights Horizon in NYC and recently off a hot run at the Goodman in Chicago. It was nominated for a Pulitzer in 2013, and is written by a playwright I already admired (we were seriously considering her Becky Shaw a couple of years ago). Reviews all say stuff like: “With searing insight and trademark wit, this comedy is an unflinching look at gender politics in the wake of 20th century feminist ideals.” In the play, Catherine is a professor and successful published author who gave up her college boyfriend to pursue her work and has not yet married. Gwen, a college friend, married Catherine’s ex-boyfriend and had the family and children. Circumstances throw these old college friends back together, and sparks fly. The New York Times said: “Ms. Gionfriddo’s play does not really present Gwen and Catherine’s lives as two sides of the same tarnished, useless coin. What’s exciting about her writing here is the multiplicity of the ideas it engages. Heady with sharp-witted dialogue about the particularities of women’s experience (there’s a joke about pornography and Google maps — believe it or not — that’s worth the ticket price alone), ‘Rapture’ more largely illuminates how hard it can be to forge both a satisfying career and a fulfilling personal life in an era that seems to demand superhuman achievement from everyone.” This play reminds me a little of Clybourne Park, not in content, but in its combination of bringing the funny while being intensely smart and thoroughly thought-provoking. It has 5 roles, and 4 of them are really kick-ass female roles that we can cast brilliantly out of our talent pool. Not only am I tickled to present a play written by a female playwright, but the number of strong female roles will help balance the highly-male cast of the famous classic on the season. This play made me laugh out loud, but asked questions about the choices we make in life that were also somewhat uncomfortable. I’m pleased to tell you that our previous artistic associate Lauren Shouse, who directed a couple of shows for us while on staff here as well as for other theatre companies in town, is fresh off completing her MFA in directing from Northwestern and will come back and guest direct.

Sep
18
Fri
Rapture, Blister, Burn @ Andrew Johnson Theater
Sep 18 all-day

rapture-blister-burn-3Blister, Burn

Appropriate audience: High school and above.

Dates:Previews: Sept 3-4, 2015
Regular Run: Sept 5-19, 2015

Location:   Johnson Theater, TPAC

Purchase Tickets by Phone:

Nashville Repertory Theatre’s production of Rapture, Blister, Burn by Gina Gionfriddo. Live onstage at Tennessee Performing Arts Center’s (TPAC) Johnson Theater, September 5–19, 2015 with previews September 3–4.

Friends Catherine and Gwen reunite after more than a decade apart when Catherine returns home to care for her mother. Catherine has had a dazzling career as a high-profile author while Gwen chose to raise a family—after marrying the man Catherine gave up to pursue her goals. As they catch up, each woman begins to covet the other’s life and question her own path. The New York Times calls this Pulitzer Prize-nominated play “intensely smart, immensely funny” as it explores life choices in the wake of 20th century feminist ideals.

   RENÉ ON RAPTURE, BLISTER, BURN

This is a great new play, launched at Playwrights Horizon in NYC and recently off a hot run at the Goodman in Chicago. It was nominated for a Pulitzer in 2013, and is written by a playwright I already admired (we were seriously considering her Becky Shaw a couple of years ago). Reviews all say stuff like: “With searing insight and trademark wit, this comedy is an unflinching look at gender politics in the wake of 20th century feminist ideals.” In the play, Catherine is a professor and successful published author who gave up her college boyfriend to pursue her work and has not yet married. Gwen, a college friend, married Catherine’s ex-boyfriend and had the family and children. Circumstances throw these old college friends back together, and sparks fly. The New York Times said: “Ms. Gionfriddo’s play does not really present Gwen and Catherine’s lives as two sides of the same tarnished, useless coin. What’s exciting about her writing here is the multiplicity of the ideas it engages. Heady with sharp-witted dialogue about the particularities of women’s experience (there’s a joke about pornography and Google maps — believe it or not — that’s worth the ticket price alone), ‘Rapture’ more largely illuminates how hard it can be to forge both a satisfying career and a fulfilling personal life in an era that seems to demand superhuman achievement from everyone.” This play reminds me a little of Clybourne Park, not in content, but in its combination of bringing the funny while being intensely smart and thoroughly thought-provoking. It has 5 roles, and 4 of them are really kick-ass female roles that we can cast brilliantly out of our talent pool. Not only am I tickled to present a play written by a female playwright, but the number of strong female roles will help balance the highly-male cast of the famous classic on the season. This play made me laugh out loud, but asked questions about the choices we make in life that were also somewhat uncomfortable. I’m pleased to tell you that our previous artistic associate Lauren Shouse, who directed a couple of shows for us while on staff here as well as for other theatre companies in town, is fresh off completing her MFA in directing from Northwestern and will come back and guest direct.

SoBro Fest @ SoBro
Sep 18 all-day

More info coming soon!

Sep
19
Sat
Hands on Nashville Day @ Nashville
Sep 19 all-day
HONday

Join us and support the places where Middle Tennessee children learn and play.

What you can do now:

volunteer

VL
Teamchallenge

Sign up for our Hands On Call eNewsletter to receive HON Day updates. To learn more about this event, read our Frequently Asked Questions.

Signing up a team? Read these simple instructions.

 

ABOUT HANDS ON NASHVILLE DAY

Now in its 24th year, Hands On Nashville Day (HON Day), presented by The Grainger Foundation, is the community’s largest annual day of service benefiting Metro Nashville Public Schools. Each September, HON mobilizes thousands of volunteers to complete ‘done-in-a-day’ improvement projects to enhance learning environments and create spaces where students can be happy, healthy and ready to learn!

This year, Hands On Nashville is introducing three new projects that reflect our day-to-day programming in urban agriculture, energy savings and public education.

Musicians Corner : Les Paul Tribute with Artists To Be Announced Angaleena Presley Joseph LeMay Daniel Martin Moore @ Centennial Park
Sep 19 all-day

Our Fall 2015 Season takes place September 5 to October 31.

Musicians Corner, a program of The Conservancy for the Parthenon and Centennial Park, presents free weekly lawn parties in Nashville’s Centennial Park on Saturday afternoons in May, June, September and October.

Follow us on Twitter: @muscornernash
Follow us on Instagram: /MusCornerNash
Learn more and get performance schedules at www.musicianscornernashville.com

Musicians Corner is a program of The Conservancy for the Parthenon and Centennial Park, a 5019c)(3) nonprofit organization.

Rapture, Blister, Burn @ Andrew Johnson Theater
Sep 19 all-day

rapture-blister-burn-3Blister, Burn

Appropriate audience: High school and above.

Dates:Previews: Sept 3-4, 2015
Regular Run: Sept 5-19, 2015

Location:   Johnson Theater, TPAC

Purchase Tickets by Phone:

Nashville Repertory Theatre’s production of Rapture, Blister, Burn by Gina Gionfriddo. Live onstage at Tennessee Performing Arts Center’s (TPAC) Johnson Theater, September 5–19, 2015 with previews September 3–4.

Friends Catherine and Gwen reunite after more than a decade apart when Catherine returns home to care for her mother. Catherine has had a dazzling career as a high-profile author while Gwen chose to raise a family—after marrying the man Catherine gave up to pursue her goals. As they catch up, each woman begins to covet the other’s life and question her own path. The New York Times calls this Pulitzer Prize-nominated play “intensely smart, immensely funny” as it explores life choices in the wake of 20th century feminist ideals.

   RENÉ ON RAPTURE, BLISTER, BURN

This is a great new play, launched at Playwrights Horizon in NYC and recently off a hot run at the Goodman in Chicago. It was nominated for a Pulitzer in 2013, and is written by a playwright I already admired (we were seriously considering her Becky Shaw a couple of years ago). Reviews all say stuff like: “With searing insight and trademark wit, this comedy is an unflinching look at gender politics in the wake of 20th century feminist ideals.” In the play, Catherine is a professor and successful published author who gave up her college boyfriend to pursue her work and has not yet married. Gwen, a college friend, married Catherine’s ex-boyfriend and had the family and children. Circumstances throw these old college friends back together, and sparks fly. The New York Times said: “Ms. Gionfriddo’s play does not really present Gwen and Catherine’s lives as two sides of the same tarnished, useless coin. What’s exciting about her writing here is the multiplicity of the ideas it engages. Heady with sharp-witted dialogue about the particularities of women’s experience (there’s a joke about pornography and Google maps — believe it or not — that’s worth the ticket price alone), ‘Rapture’ more largely illuminates how hard it can be to forge both a satisfying career and a fulfilling personal life in an era that seems to demand superhuman achievement from everyone.” This play reminds me a little of Clybourne Park, not in content, but in its combination of bringing the funny while being intensely smart and thoroughly thought-provoking. It has 5 roles, and 4 of them are really kick-ass female roles that we can cast brilliantly out of our talent pool. Not only am I tickled to present a play written by a female playwright, but the number of strong female roles will help balance the highly-male cast of the famous classic on the season. This play made me laugh out loud, but asked questions about the choices we make in life that were also somewhat uncomfortable. I’m pleased to tell you that our previous artistic associate Lauren Shouse, who directed a couple of shows for us while on staff here as well as for other theatre companies in town, is fresh off completing her MFA in directing from Northwestern and will come back and guest direct.

Tennessee Volkfest @ Nashville Farmers Market
Sep 19 – Sep 20 all-day
web-poster
Tennessee Volksfest @ Nashville Farmers Market for 2 Weekends.
September 12th & 13th & 19th & 20th. Gates @ 11am
FREE
Kid & Dog Friendly
The Tennessee Volksfest is back, and excited to return for not one but TWO big weekends at the Nashville Farmers Market. Come out and enjoy Nashville’s only true Munich style Oktoberfest. Enjoy half liters of German beers, bratwurst, hot pretzels, and a variety of great German foods. Plus, there will be live music, games, and fun for all ages.
http://www.tennesseevolksfest.com/
Sep
20
Sun
Nashville Sunday Night Presents: Jay Farrar performing songs from Son Volt’s “Trace” plus special guest: Parker Millsap @ 3rd and Lindsley
Sep 20 @ 8:00 PM – 10:00 PM

Artist

As a founder of alternative country pioneers Uncle Tupelo, as a solo artist, and as the leader of Son Volt, Jay Farrar’s work often seeks out the ghosts of America’s discordant or forgotten past, converses at length with them, and writes songs that stake a claim to a better future. Most recently, Farrar has added One Fast Move Or I’m Gone: Music From Kerouac’s Big Sur (F-Stop/Atlantic), a collaboration project with Benjamin Gibbard of Death Cab For Cutie, to his long list of critically acclaimed albums.

For many years, Farrar’s songwriting has been inspired and influenced by Kerouac’s compositional style. He called upon this inspiration when writing the songs for One Fast Move Or I’m Gone by pulling passages directly from the Kerouac’s Big Sur and putting them to music with Gibbard. These songs were then used in the documentary about Kerouac of the same name.

Son Volt’s most recent release, American Central Dust (Rounder), marks the apotheosis of both the Son Volt dynamic and the rigorous aesthetic that distinguishes Farrar’s entire body of work, in which classic and contemporary elements are fashioned into arresting new shapes. In the classic sense, the new album exhilaratingly carries on the tradition of the Byrds, the Flying Burrito Brothers, Little Feat circa Sailin’ Shoes, the Rolling Stones of Exile on Main Street and early R.E.M.

“The approach was to get back to more fundamental themes, both lyrically and musically, to make a more focused record,” Farrar explains. “The Search was more about expanding the scope in terms of song structures and instrumentation. This time around, I was going for a kind of simplicity, even in the structure of the songs. I probably learned that from listening to Tom Waits, where simplicity can be a virtue.”

These songs are the modern-day aural equivalent of the photographs of Walker Evans, Robert Frank and William Eggleston: sharply observed yet compassionate images of the telling details of everyday life during hard times. Several of them play out as psychological travelogues, as Farrar captures moods in motion. “I suppose I gather ideas for my songs while on the road,” he says, “but there’s also always the consciousness there that the songs are gonna be played on the road, so it’s intertwined.”

Sep
27
Sun
Nashville Sunday Night Presents: The Damnwells @ 3rd and Lindsley
Sep 27 @ 8:00 PM – 10:00 PM

Artist

Indie rock band The Damnwells came together 15 years ago in a downtown New York City storage unit hastily repurposed as a rehearsal room and imploded onstage at what should have been a career pinnacle: a live appearance to promote the release of a documentary about the band and its journey. Now, for the first time since 2006, the founding members have reconvened to release the band’s most definitive album, appropriately titled, The Damnwells.

The Damnwells are Alex Dezen lead vocals, guitar, piano; David Chernis, lead guitar; Ted Hudson bass; and Steven Terry drums/percussion. The band has released five studio albums, been the subject of a documentary, Golden Days, had a top 20 Triple A charting song, and toured relentlessly, sharing stages with The Fray, the Dixie Chicks, Old 97s, Cheap Trick, and Bob Dylan, among others.

At the core of the band is the bond of Alex Dezen and bassist Ted Hudson. The two met at Bard College in 1996 and have remained the band nucleus since its inception. The original lineup also includes drummer Steven Terry, who formerly played with Ryan Adams’ critically acclaimed band Whiskeytown, and seasoned vet lead guitarist David Chernis.

Steven and David left The Damnwells disillusioned with the music industry, and focused their post band life on starting families. Alex and Ted remained musically active, soldiering for two more Damnwells albums with varied accomplished musicians from their inner creative circle. Alex also released a highly personal solo project consisting of four EPs. Most significantly, in his time away from the band being a full-time entity, Alex emerged a formidable professional songwriter, working with such diverse artists as Justin Bieber, The Dixie Chicks, Dave Grohl, Gary Louris of The Jayhawks, Jason Derulo, Christina Perri, Genevieve Schatz of Company of Thieves, and Kelly Clarkson.

The Damnwells official final gig was in Phoenix at the band’s documentary release party. What was supposed to be a celebratory time was anything but—members of the band were weary of the road and the fickle and ever-changing music industry, and tired of each other. A smashed guitar and icy tensions remain stinging memories from that gig.

“That last show felt like we were playing our funeral,” Alex recalls. After that final gig, the band members didn’t speak for years. It was album producer Salim Nourallah (Old 97s) who first suggested the reunion.  “When we first played together, I was scared, but when we started going through old songs it was epiphanic,” Alex says.

The resulting self-titled album is the band’s most sharply focused collection of literate, heartfelt, and hook-laden Americana. The lead-off single, “Lost,” is blissful melancholia about trying to find your way in a post breakup landscape. The raucous and rootsy “Kentexas” ponders the mischievous wonders of being aimless after the demise of a relationship. On “Kill Me,” The Damnwells finally document the band’s wry sense of humor with witty pop culture commentary blasted within euphoric power-pop. The 11-song album concludes with the stately folk of the heartbreaking “None Of These Things.”

Oct
3
Sat
Lightning 100 Presents Brandi Carlile @ Ryman Auditorium
Oct 3 @ 7:00 PM – 11:00 PM
LIVE AT THE RYMAN

Brandi Carlile

Saturday, October 3, 2015
8:00 PM
$66, $40.50 & $33.50
On Sale Friday, June 19 at 10 AM
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If purchasing tickets in person at the Ryman Box Office or any Ticketmaster outlet, your spot in line will be determined by a lottery. For details, click here
Oct
4
Sun
Nashville Sunday Night Presents: Kodaline with Good Old War @ 3rd and Lindsley
Oct 4 @ 8:00 PM – 10:00 PM
Artist
That Kodaline are ready to release their second album has still to sink in with the men who made it. The Dublin quartet didn’t plan to follow up last year’s 350,000-selling In A Perfect World so promptly. In fact, they didn’t plan at all. Sparked by an experiment that inspired them to shake up their sound, the band started recording and couldn’t stop. Just eight weeks later, Coming Up For Air was complete.Kodaline were still on tour in support of their debut – which went Top 3 in Britain, spent nine weeks at No.1 in their native Ireland and made inroads in Europe and the States – when they received an invitation to spend a week in L.A. with producer Jacknife Lee.“We didn’t regard it as an album session,” insists guitarist Mark Prendergast. “We thought we’d have some fun and see what happened. Jacknife is Irish and his track record is unbelievable. We weren’t about to turn that down.”What Kodaline didn’t expect was to leave L.A. with an entirely new approach to making music, an affection for synths and their second album’s epic first single, Honest, already written.

“Jacknife opened our eyes to different ways of working,” explains bassist Jason Boland. “He gave us a lesson in experimentation. The way he records is amazing. He has everything in the studio turned on, synths all over the place, instruments everywhere. If you want to play something, you pick it up.”

“He asked if we felt out of our comfort zone,” continues drummer Vinny May. “Yes? Then you’re on the right track. We didn’t set out to make any electronic music. We’ve always had synths in the studio; this time, we chose to use them. We put strange sounds in places we weren’t sure would work, then listened back a day later and discovered they were key to the song.”

Back in Britain, as soon as festival season finished, an inspired Kodaline set to work on the album they were itching to make. Electronics played a key part, adding depth, new dimensions and a harder edge to the band’s trademark soaring choruses and widescreen sound.

Coming Up For Air’s sense of adventure stems from its lack of planning. Nothing was set in stone. Every song dictated its own direction. When Play The Game suggested a gospel singer, it got one (Christina Matovu). When the gorgeous, acoustic guitar-backed Better called out for strings, they come courtesy of an orchestra in Prague.

Coming Up For Air may be a sonic step on, but at its core remains Kodaline’s ability to connect instantly with an audience, to share the emotions in their songs and to pull the listener in to their world. It’s a smart, sharp, sophisticated album, by a band only just discovering what they’re capable of.

 

Oct
10
Sat
Lightning 100 Presents Green River Ordinance with Lucie Silvas @ Exit / In
Oct 10 all-day

Lightning 100 Presents:

Green River Ordinance

Lucie Silvas

SAT, OCTOBER 10, 2015

DOORS: 8:00 PM / SHOW: 9:00 PM

EXIT/IN

NASHVILLE, TN

$15.00 – $18.00

THIS EVENT IS 18 AND OVER

Absolutely no refunds – no exceptions. Lineups and times are subject to change.
Gov’t issued ID required. No re-entry.

Green River Ordinance

Green River Ordinance

OVER THE DECADE-LONG JOURNEY FROM THEIR FIRST INCARNATION AS 13 AND 14 YEAR OLD KIDS IN FORT WORTH, TEXAS TO THE UPCOMING RELEASE OF THEIR LATEST EP, “CHASING DOWN THE WIND,” GREEN RIVER ORDINANCE HAS EVOLVED STEADILY. “CHASING DOWN THE WIND” FEATURES THE CONTINUED GROWTH OF GREEN RIVER ORDINANCE’S HONEST, HOPEFUL SONGWRITING, AND SOARING HARMONIES. WRITTEN ON THE BANKS OF THE CANEY FORK RIVER IN RURAL TENNESSEE, THEIR NEW EP CAPTURES THE SPIRIT AND FREEDOM THAT COMES FROM ESCAPING THE RUSH OF THE BIG CITY AND REDISCOVERING THE SIMPLE THINGS IN LIFE. RELEASED ON 6.18.13, “CHASING DOWN THE WIND” DEBUTED AT #15 ON ITUNES OVERALL, #1 ON THE SINGER-SONGWRITER CHART, IN THE BILLBOARD TOP 100, #6 ON THE BILLBOARD FOLK CHART, #26 ON BILLBOARD ROCK, AND WAS THE #88 MOST SOLD ALBUM IN THE COUNTRY.

GRO’S INTENSITY AND STRONG FAN CONNECTION PROMPTED EMI TO SIGN THEM TO CAPITOL RECORDS AND IN 2009, THE BAND’S DEBUT ALBUM, “OUT OF MY HANDS,” SHOT TO THE TOP OF THE BILLBOARD CHARTS AND CATAPULTED THEIR TWO SINGLES “COME ON” AND “ON YOUR OWN” INTO THE TOP 40. GRO HAS SHARED STAGES WITH ACTS LIKE BON JOVI, TRAIN, NEEDTOBREATHE, ZAC BROWN, COUNTING CROWS, AND THE GOO GOO DOLLS AMONG MANY OTHERS. GRO HAS HAD THEIR MUSIC PLAYED ON 56 NETWORK AND CABLE SHOWS, IN THREE FILMS, AND HAD THEIR VIDEOS FEATURED ON MTV, VH1 & CMT. GRO’S INDEPENDENT FOLLOW UP RECORD, UNDER FIRE, PROPELLED BY THE SUCCESS OF THE SINGLES “DANCING SHOES” AND “HEART OF ME” IN BOTH COUNTRY & HOT AC FORMATS, CONTINUED TO PUSH THE BAND’S NATIONAL SUCCESS REACHING THE BILLBOARD TOP 100 CHART.

WALKING THE LINES OF COUNTRY, ROCK, POP, AND FOLK, GREEN RIVER ORDINANCE IS A BAND THAT CONSTANTLY CHALLENGES THE BORDERS OF GENRE. HOWEVER AS THEIR MUSIC CONTINUES TO MATURE AND CHANGE, GRO STILL HOLDS TRUE TO THE PURSUIT OF MUSIC THAT SPEAKS TO THE SOUL AND MOVES YOUR FEET.

Lucie Silvas
Born in the UK and raised part of her life in New Zealand by her Kiwi Dad and Scottish Mother… Lucie Silvas grew up listening to her parents favourites from Ray Charles to Nat king Cole to James Taylor and Roberta Flack. She started playing the piano and writing songs at age 10 but wasn’t exposed to the music industry until she was 17 when she went out on the road as a backing singer for British singer/songwriter Judie Tzuke. A few years later she released her debut album “Breathe In” and toured extensively around Europe for the following years with both her debut and second album. Lucie has worked and duetted with many artists including Jamie Cullum, Elton John, Lionel Richie and Jamiroquai. After selling over a million albums in Europe alone and achieving success for both her own music and songs she had written for other artists, Lucie moved to Nashville where she performed with various artists including Kacey Musgraves. Lucie recently returned from a run of shows opening for the legendary Tom Jones, performing at notable venues such as The Ryman Auditorium and the Atlantic Symphony Hall. Amongst performing and songwriting this year, Lucie finished recording her much anticipated and long overdue album featuring her newest single, “Letters To Ghosts,” which was just released on iTunes. All the songs were co-written and co-produced by Lucie and the track “Roots” was featured on the US TV show THE CLIENT LIST.
Oct
11
Sun
Nashville Sunday Night Presents: HoneyHoney @ 3rd and Lindsley
Oct 11 @ 8:00 PM – 10:00 PM

Artist

The third full-length effort from L.A.-based duo HONEYHONEY, 3 is an album born from fascination with the sweet and the sleazy, light and dark, danger and magic. Working with Dave Cobb (the producer behind Jason Isbell’s Southeastern and Sturgill Simpson’s Metamodern Sounds in Country Music), lead singer/banjo player/violinist Suzanne Santo and vocalist/guitarist Ben Jaffe twist their gritty, harmony-driven brand of Southern-flavored rock & roll through tales of lost souls, broken boys, girls with gold in their spit. Equal parts inward-looking and endlessly curious, the two songwriters also take a mirror to their own experience in lust and heartache and never shy away from revealing the messy truth. And whether they rattle or soothe or joyfully inspire, HONEYHONEY instill each song with a straight-from-the-gut honesty and elegance of storytelling that make both cathartic and electrifying.

For HONEYHONEY, the balance of sophistication and heart that the duo strikes onhas much to do with their closeness as songwriting collaborators. “Writing is about trust—trust in yourself and trust in your partner—and with us there’s a level of trust that you can only get from knowing someone for years and years,” says Jaffe. Forming the band in 2006, Santo and Jaffe first crossed paths at a costume party (she was a cheetah, he was Ralph Macchio in The Karate Kid), felt an instant creative connection, and soon started making music together. Although Jaffe learned to play violin and drums as a little kid in western Massachusetts and joined a local jazz band in high school, the Ohio-bred Santo initially pursued work in acting and didn’t think of music as a possible path until early adulthood. “I was new to L.A. and I’d just broken up with my first love,” she recalls. “I started writing these awful songs but I just kept going with it, and after a while it hit me that this was what I was supposed to do with my life.” Making their full-length debut with 2008’s First Rodeo, HONEYHONEY saw their sophomore album Billy Jack climb to #15 on Billboard’s Folk Albums chart and soon began earning praise from the likes of The Onion’s A.V. Club and LA Weekly.

Though Santo and Jaffe consider their continued growth as songwriters to be the lifeblood of the band, their live show also makes for a major element of the HONEYHONEY experience. “The reason we write songs is to express something real, and being able to engage with people directly the way we do onstage is a really important part of that,” Jaffe says. Fueled by their easy chemistry and between-song banter, the duo’s stage presence adds a whole new level of spirit and passion to their sound. “If there’s any kind of goal to what we’re doing, it’s to shake things up for the people listening,” says Santo. “Whether they need to dance or get happy or get angry or whatever, we can make that happen for them. We’ll make you cry and then make you laugh in under ten minutes.”

Oct
13
Tue
Lightning 100 Presents Warren Haynes with Gill Landry @ Ryman Auditorium
Oct 13 @ 7:30 PM – 11:00 PM

Warren Haynes

with Gill Landry
Tuesday, October 13, 2015
7:30 PM
$45 & $37
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GRAMMY ® Award-winning artist, Warren Haynes is set to bring his rootsy/Americana soundscape back to Nashville on October 13 at historic Ryman Auditorium. In support of only the third studio album Haynes has ever released under his own name, Ashes and Dust, he puts fourth one of his most gorgeous, musically rich and personal albums to date. Throughout his prolific career as part of three of the greatest live groups in rock history – Allman Brothers Band, Gov’t Mule and the Dead – his virtuosic artistry has led to thousands of unforgettable performances.

Opening the show will be Gill Landry from Old Crow Medicine Show.

LIGHTNING 100 PRESENTS: Leon Bridges with Kali Uchis @ Marathon Music Works
Oct 13 @ 7:30 PM – 11:30 PM

LIGHTNING 100 PRESENTS:

Leon Bridges

Kali Uchis

TUE, OCTOBER 13, 2015

DOORS: 7:30 PM / SHOW: 8:30 PM

MARATHON MUSIC WORKS

NASHVILLE, TN

$22.00 – $25.00

ON SALE FRI 6/19 12:00 PM CDT

THIS EVENT IS 18 AND OVER

ABSOLUTELY NO REFUNDS – NO EXCEPTIONS. LINEUPS AND TIMES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE.
GOV’T ISSUED ID REQUIRED. NO RE-ENTRY.

Leon Bridges

Leon Bridges

The river of soul music flows on deep and strong, and 25-year-old Leon Bridges is immersed in its life-giving current. The Forth Worth, Texas native and Columbia Records artist is currently preparing his debut album for release in the summer of 2015. “I’m not saying I can hold a candle to any soul musician from the ’50s and ’60s,” Bridges says, “but I want to carry the torch.”Humility aside, Bridges’ light is burning bright. Following the October, 2014 release of two tunes that set the on-line world aflame, and accompanied by intimate solo shows from London to Los Angeles and Nashville to New York, the singer and songwriter has proved himself a rare talent who can do smoldering ballads and elemental rock’n’roll with equal aplomb. While he appears to have emerged cut from the cloth and fully formed, Bridges explains in his dulcet voice how he came to be here now.

“As a kid I grew fascinated with modern R&B. In high school I’d try singing songs by Ginuwine and Usher,” he explains, “and I thought well, maybe they weren’t in my range.” Instead, a lithe, nimble physicality led Leon to study dance at Tarrant County College in Fort Worth. “I’d been doing hip-hop dance since I was 11 years old,” he says. “I knew there was a dance program there, and I started diving into ballet and jazz and modern technique and learning choreography. I thought that’s what I wanted to do.”

Native inspiration soon diverted his path. “A friend of mine brought his keyboard to school every day, and we’d have these little jam sessions, improvising, and I started to find my voice.” One day a female friend asked Bridges to look after her guitar while she went to class. “I asked her to show me a couple chords first. And she did: A-minor and E-minor. I fell in love with their sound, and that’s when I started writing songs, from those two chords.”

That Bridges compositional bedrock began in a minor mode is revealing. At a moment when popular music seems in thrall to major chord sing-alongs, the blue hues of Bridges’ tunes embrace a subtlety that feels wholly refreshing. “Based on my innocence on guitar and my lack of knowledge of the technical side, my songwriting is something I have to make on-point with melody and delivery to make it shine,” he explains.

With a few early compositions tucked under his belt, a seeming dichotomy surfaced: Bridges’ tunes sounded less like the modern R&B he’d grown up loving than a style he was, in fact, not very familiar with: classic soul. Furthermore, Bridges’ sleek, fastidious fashion sensibility dovetailed with the songs he was writing. He began a tenderfoot period of apprenticeship playing coffeehouses in and around Fort Worth, slowly finding and refining his voice.

A turning point soon came via a pair of selvedge trousers. One night at an Austin bar Bridges was approached by a young woman who complimented him on his snazzy Wrangler’s and said that he should meet her boyfriend, a fellow with a comparable sense of style. Her boyfriend turned out to be Austin Jenkins of the band White Denim. “I hadn’t heard of White Denim at the time,” Bridges says, “but I went and looked them up and thought yeah, that’s interesting music.” After Jenkins and his bandmate Joshua Block subsequently peeped Bridges perform at a low-key local show, they insisted Leon enter the studio to cut a few tracks on their burgeoning bank of vintage equipment.

That initial three-day session, with Jenkins and Block producing, yielded the recordings that set Bridges at the center of rapturous attention from aficionados and labels alike. The buttery, seductive “Coming Home” and the piston-driven, doo-wop flavored “Better Man” demonstrated Bridges’ versatility. Inking with Columbia Records, whose roster includes a certain hero named Bob Dylan, was the outcome of courtship and deliberation. “Columbia has artists I look up to like Adele and Pharrell, as well as Raphael Saadiq and John Legend,” says Bridges. “They way they value artistry makes it feel like home.”

The early 2015 release of another new song, “Lisa Sawyer,” has further burnished Bridges’ promise. With its brushed snares and glowing brass, “Lisa Sawyer” is a remarkably assured offering from so young a talent. The song, about Bridges’ mother, a woman “with the complexion of a sweet praline,” has the flavor of one of Allen Toussaint’s productions for the great Lee Dorsey. Connecting the sacred and the secular, “Lisa Sawyer” feels natural considering Bridges’ churchgoing childhood. And by writing with specificity about his own family, Bridges is creating resonant work about the African-American experience.

“I have a lot of insecurities because I don’t have a big powerhouse voice,” he admits. “I’m not a shouter. I rely on phrasing to get my feeling across.” Bridges’ delivery exudes strength through tenderness. “I guess that’s why I connected with Sam Cooke.”

The name Sam Cooke has appeared frequently in Bridges’ early notices in the press. The point of comparison is apt, but not initially intentional. “When I wrote ‘Lisa Sawyer’ I didn’t know anything about old soul music,” Leon says. “I was asked ‘Is Sam Cooke one of your inspirations?’ I had to say no, because I only knew Sam Cooke’s ‘A Change Is Gonna Come’ from the movie Malcolm X, which I’d watched with my father. But from being asked about Sam Cooke and Otis Redding I started digging deeper into soul music from the ’50 and ’60s and realizing this is really the root of what I’m doing.”

What to make of the fact that Bridges is working in a tradition whose existence he was initially only vaguely aware of? “It speaks to the gift God placed in me,” Leon says, choosing his words carefully. “It humbles and wows me to think I was pulling from something I didn’t really know about.”

In the striking black-and-white images that have accompanied Leon’s emergence, one photograph stands out. It depicts Bridges sauntering down a sunlit sidewalk, his shadow falling not behind him but stretching out in the direction of his forward stride. The implication is that Bridges is not walking away from the past, but moving forward with both family history and the tradition of soul music in full view. His ancestors and antecedents walk with him. “They’re with me at all times,” affirms Bridges. Steeped in tradition, drenched with intention and desire, Leon Bridges’ soul music is happening here and now.

Kali Uchis

Kali Uchis

The Colombian born and Virginia raised singer released her first studio-recorded EP, Por Vida, on February 3rd this year and has collaborated with artists/producers including Tyler The Creator, Snoop Dogg, Diplo, and Rick Rubin. Her first studio release has already garnered praise from the likes of Billboard, Pitchfork, Noisey, and The Fader (see links below). With a sound that mirrors Amy Winehouse and 60s soul, Kali makes the old sound new again with a funky twist. She is on the way to becoming a household name.
Oct
14
Wed
Lightning 100 Presents: Waxahatchee with Weyes Blood and Try The Pie @ Exit/In
Oct 14 @ 8:00 PM – 11:45 PM
Waxahatchee

Waxahatchee

Katie Crutchfield’s southern roots are undeniable. The name of her solo musical project Waxahatchee comes from a creek not far from her childhood home in Alabama and seems to represent both where she came from and where she’s going. Since leaving home, Crutchfield has drifted between New York and Philadelphia but chose to return to Alabama to write her first two albums: American Weekend, her debut filled with powerful lo-fi acoustic tracks full of lament, and Cerulean Salt, a more developed and solid narrative about growing up. Both are representations of a youthful struggle with unresolved issues and unrequited feelings.

Waxhatchee’s latest record, Ivy Tripp, drifts confidently from these previous albums and brings forth a more informed and powerful recognition of where Crutchfield has currently found herself. The lament and grieving for her youth seem to have been replaced with control and sheer self-honesty. “My life has changed a lot in the last two years, and it’s been hard for me to process my feelings other than by writing songs,” says Crutchfield. “I think a running theme [of Ivy Tripp] is steadying yourself on shaky ground and reminding yourself that you have control in situations that seem overwhelming, or just being cognizant in moments of deep confusion or sadness, and learning to really feel emotions and to grow from that.”

Recorded and engineered by Kyle Gilbride of Wherever Audio at Crutchfield’s home on New York’s Long Island—with drums recorded in the gym of a local elementary school—Ivy Tripp presents a more developed and aged version of Waxahatchee. “The title Ivy Tripp is really just a term I made up for directionless-ness, specifically of the 20-something, 30-something, 40-something of today, lacking regard for the complaisant life path of our parents and grandparents. I have thought of it like this: Cerulean Salt is a solid and Ivy Tripp is a gas.”

Crutchfield is accompanied by both Gilbride and Keith Spencer on Ivy Tripp, and the record was produced by all three of them. With the addition of more guitar work, piano, drum machines, and Crutchfield’s vocals in full bloom, we are given a record that feels more emphatic and pronounced. Ivy Tripp opens with “Breathless,” filled with only a distorted keyboard and layers of vocals, showcasing Waxahatchee’s pension for quiet, personal reflection. The record then opens up into “Under a Rock,” a quicker guitar-driven song that lays the foundation for the rest of the album, which as a whole resonates with strong, self-aware lyrics, energetic ballads, and powerfully hushed moments of solitude. Crutchfield’s voice is certainly the guiding force behind Ivy Tripp—commanding and voluminous in the rock song “Poison,” candied and pure in the frolicking “La Loose”—gripping you tightly and then softly releasing you into the wilds of emotion.

As far as her goals with Ivy Tripp, Crutchfield says, “I heard someone say that you have to be the change you want to see. I just want to be the kind of musician I want to see in the world. I want to present myself in a way that reflects that.”

Weyes Blood

Weyes Blood

There exists a terrifying film called The Innocents, starring Deborah Kerr, released in 1961. It’s based on a play of the same name, which in turn was an adaptation of Henry James’ novella The Turn Of The Screw. All versions involve a governess hired to care for two young children, who may or may not be possessed by the ghosts of the couple who looked after them in the past, a couple whose deviant nature destroyed the lives around them (including their own).

Those who’ve had occasion to watch the film version haven’t easily forgotten the opening credits: as you sit in complete darkness (or some reasonable facsimile thereof … c’mon, work with us), and well before the studio logo is displayed, you hear a little girl’s voice, unaccompanied, singing these words:

We lay, my love and I, beneath the weeping willow.

But now alone I lie and weep beside the tree.

Singing “O Willow Waly” by the tree that weeps with me.

Singing “O Willow Waly” till my lover return to me.

We lay, my love and I, beneath the weeping willow.

A broken heart have I.

O willow, I die…

O willow, I die.

The film’s credits roll on, screen right, as the image of Ms. Kerr, praying and sobbing, is superimposed on the left. That sequence puts you on the back foot and keeps you there, even as you begin to doubt the events of the story that follows, lingering on like mist, heavy and earthbound.

Henry James would’ve wanted it that way. Tired of the ways in which authors had depicted the supernatural, the author extrapolated their evil nature out of elements you’d never expect, or in his own words, “the strange and sinister embroidered on … the normal and easy.” And his notions of how to represent these tropes have since fed into our familiar understanding of how suspense works as a narrative device in the centuries that followed. James made us all more suspicious; where we find beauty and sadness, we often assume that it has been influenced by some spectre whose bent will keeps its presence lingering from beyond the grave, whose sorrows have curdled into vengeance. We walk alone in wintery woods, past the frozen lake, wind whipping through the bare branches, and we cannot help but wonder if we are truly alone, if there is any creature that could take us down with it every time we hear the dead leaves rustle or the snapping of a dried branch, or if it’s all in our minds.

The Innocents is the name of the second album by Natalie Mering, who performs as Weyes Blood. Its ten songs confront us with their truths. There is the beauty of Ms. Mering’s voice, whose strength across two vocal registers reveals a vulnerability belied by some of her lyrics. On all but one of the songs on The Innocents, her voice is the dominant quality, tracked in multi-part harmonies with herself. There is the semblance of training in her voice to get her to where she can sing today, or any number of devices we as listeners impose upon her, because most of us are not privy to a vocalist of such rare choral purity.

Then there is the truth of the words she sings on The Innocents, words so clear that they cannot be misinterpreted. It’s not unintentional that Weyes Blood is a colloquialism referring to Flannery O’Connor, though Mering doesn’t mince for words. Forget similes and metaphors: when you are confronted with lyrics like those found on “Some Winters” (“I’m as broken/as a woman can be” … “Go on, leave me for the last time”), lyrics that are so emotionally unflinching that they could pierce stone, the notion of any other interpretations seem trivial. And yet, you will try. As you sift through her words, you’ll feel something, and you’ll associate those feeling with past experiences that may cause you to associate them with something more, something that affects your own emotional state.

Finally, there is the truth of the music. Rooted in American and British folk, Weyes Blood pulls and stretches the style at its fringes, like a sweater that’s just begun to unravel. Traditional instruments (guitar, piano, drums) are set against electronics and tape effects, collages and the melodic qualities of delay, that bridge an older world of songcraft into the future, creating a synthesis between all the best of the 20th century and those that came before. A song like the melancholy ballad “Bad Magic” possesses infinite beauty in its sadness and how it releases those sentiments, but it’s even more beautiful in relief to all the other material on The Innocents. Never once does she repeat herself. Each song is a variant on the styles present in the record, and each is unmistakably her own.

Not dissimilar to the work of Henry James, Weyes Blood presents a series of musical interludes, free for you to interpret but poised to elicit a raw emotional response. Does her music sound haunted to you, then, because it evokes memories that trigger our own fears, or do you honestly believe that there is a ghost dictating her every turn? As Mering stated in a recent interview, her work’s “creepiness … is only as intentional as you think it is.” To her, this is the only form of expression: laid bare, deeply connected to the past, and miles away from anything else you’re likely to hear in music today.

Try The Pie
Oct
18
Sun
Musicians Corner : Band of Heathens, The Suffers, Sarah Potenza, Centennial jamBands @ Centennial Park
Oct 18 all-day

Our Fall 2015 Season takes place September 5 to October 31.

Musicians Corner, a program of The Conservancy for the Parthenon and Centennial Park, presents free weekly lawn parties in Nashville’s Centennial Park on Saturday afternoons in May, June, September and October.

Follow us on Twitter: @muscornernash
Follow us on Instagram: /MusCornerNash
Learn more and get performance schedules at www.musicianscornernashville.com

Musicians Corner is a program of The Conservancy for the Parthenon and Centennial Park, a 5019c)(3) nonprofit organization.

Nashville Sunday Night Presents: The Black Lillies @ 3rd and Lindsley
Oct 18 @ 8:00 PM – 10:00 PM

Artist

“The Black Lillies are fronted by the best-matched male-female vocal duo since Gram Parsons and Emmylou Harris,” says News OK. It sounds like an overstatement – unless you’ve heard the Black Lillies. Then it sounds like a reasonable claim.

The Black Lillies are a band for the ages, not the slick, soulless music that seems to get most of the radio airplay, but rich, rootsy tunes performed with as much heart as technical virtuosity. This commitment to authenticity has earned them accolades from outlets as diverse as Rolling Stone Magazine, who calls them one of “the most buzzworthy new acts in country and Americana,” and the Wall Street Journal, who praised their “rootsy flair … a winsome hybrid traditional enough to appeal to an Opry crowd and expansive enough to ensnare a broader audience.”

Their third and latest album, Runaway Freeway Blues, is a beautiful ode to restless spirits and rambling hearts – rooted in the mud-rutted switchbacks of Appalachia; it is the sound of a band that’s becoming something of a phenomenon across the country. That album conquered the Billboard Top 200 country charts and dominated Americana radio, spending three months in the top 5 on the radio charts and claiming the #18 spot on the Americana Music Association’s Top 100 Albums of 2013 (based on radio airplay). It was selected for dozens of Best of 2013 lists and caught the attention of NPR, CMT, Vanity Fair, American Songwriter, Guitar World, Garden & Gun and more for whatEntertainment Weekly calls “strong roots-folk songwriting, sweet harmonies, and charismatic indie spirit.”

They’ve enthralled audiences at festivals ranging from Bonnaroo and South by Southwest to CMA Fan Fair and Stagecoach, won two Independent Music Awards, and played the Grand Ole Opry more than any other independent band.

The music is breakneck, brazen and beautiful; gentle Laurel Canyon folk, the honky-tonk heartache of classic country, winding jams and flat-out rock’n’roll … but full of the spirit of the open road, heading down the highway and not about to stop anytime soon!

Oct
23
Fri
Ragnar Relay @ Chattanooga to Nashville
Oct 23 – Oct 24 all-day

 


Training for TennesseeCountry Music, Honky Tonk Row and a course designed for the ultimate adventure await you and your team. Starting in Chattanooga you will hug the Tennessee River and head northwest. Your team will run, day and night, across the rolling hills of southern Tennessee while enjoying the stunning October foliage. After the hills, you will move on to the ‘stills, as you conquer the course with your team. The race (and your stamina) will wrap up, when you honky tonk your way to the Country Music Hall of Fame, in Nashville, Tennessee. Clear your running calendar, this is one race you don’t want to miss.

Ragnar Relay Tennessee Facebook Event Page

Tennessee Facebook Event Page

RSVP to find runners and to stay in the loop with event specific updates!


Runners Love Ragnar Relay!

99%

99% of runners would recommend Ragnar after running Ragnar Relay Tennessee

It was a fun experience that I will never forget, helped me forge some great bonds with my teammates that I wouldnt have otherwise and it got me running more than ever!

90% full


Regular (12)
$1620.00
$135.00 per runner
Ultra (6)
$1080.00
$180.00 per runner
High School (12)
$500.00
$41.67 per runner
Time’s almost up! Tennessee registration ends on September 13, 2015
at 11:59 PM MST

 5.75% transaction fee will be added to registrations

Brooks
Clif Bar
Tom Tom
SmartWool
Sierra Nevada Brewing
BondiBand
Jay Bird
Nuun
Nathan
Monster Rehab
Pro Compression
Trigger Point
MyID
Goal Zero
Sweatvac
Scott James Jewelry
Pear Sports
Elevated Legs
Transamerica
Empire Emblems
Shower Pill
Krave Jerky
The Tube Waistband
BoCo Gear

 

Oct
24
Sat
Musicians Corner : Martin Sexton Artist To Be Announced Magnolia Sons Ivory Layne @ Centennial Park
Oct 24 all-day

Our Fall 2015 Season takes place September 5 to October 31.

Musicians Corner, a program of The Conservancy for the Parthenon and Centennial Park, presents free weekly lawn parties in Nashville’s Centennial Park on Saturday afternoons in May, June, September and October.

Follow us on Twitter: @muscornernash
Follow us on Instagram: /MusCornerNash
Learn more and get performance schedules at www.musicianscornernashville.com

Musicians Corner is a program of The Conservancy for the Parthenon and Centennial Park, a 5019c)(3) nonprofit organization.

Oct
25
Sun
Nashville Sunday Night Presents: The Sheepdogs with Radio Moscow @ 3rd and Lindsley
Oct 25 @ 8:00 PM – 10:00 PM

Artist

The Sheepdogs built their name on hard work and determination.  Having funded their first three albums and early years of touring on their own, this rock and roll band’s momentum began to build exponentially with the release of the 2010 album, Learn & Burn (which is now certified platinum in Canada). The band would go on to win three 2012 JUNO Awards (the Canadian equivalent of a Grammy): New Group of the Year, Single of the Year and Rock Album of the Year.  With a list of accolades this impressive the band is on the brink of engaging fans on a wider scale.

“The Sheepdogs,” the self-titled album produced by The Black Keys’ Patrick Carney and Austin Scaggs released in 2012, introduced the band to the U.S. and beyond.  The album earned the band three more JUNO nominations for Best Album, Best Single, and Best Group and was certified gold in Canada in 2013.

Hailing from the small Canadian town of Saskatoon, SK, The Sheepdogs won an international competition in 2011 securing them the cover of Rolling Stone, making the group the first unsigned band to appear on its front page. The win, decided by 1.5 million public votes, also scored them a record deal with Atlantic, which offered up a new EP from the band, Five Easy Pieces, in August 2011.

After the band was introduced to Carney at Petty Fest in New York following the contest, he immediately began offering ideas for The Sheepdogs next album (“He seemed strangely passionate about it,” Currie notes). The hope was that Carney could actually produce the album. In January 2012, Carney invited the band to the studio, where they culled together old material and quickly began laying down new ideas.

Although the band had only spent those two and a half weeks with Carney, Scaggs and studio engineer Roger Moutenot in Nashville’s Haptown Studios, the sessions proved fruitful. From “The Way It Is,” a thumping, blues-tinged track, to rollicking stomper “Feeling Good,” the album embraces a vast range of influences, pulling in various styles and genres to create a collection of raucous, unabashed rock and roll numbers. Both “The Way It Is” and “Feeling Good” took the top slot on Canada’s Overall Rock Chart.  A pensive reflection is threaded throughout the album, whether on mid-tempo acoustic track “Laid Back” or on pounding rocker “While We’re Young.”

After touring steadily since 2006 and spending the last year entirely on the road with bands like Kings of Leon, John Fogerty and Robert Randolph & the Family Band, The Sheepdogs hoped to create songs that would lend themselves to their impassioned performances. The band, which has also performed at numerous festivals, including Coachella, Bonnaroo and SXSW, enlisted a keyboard player as the new album features a heavy dose of Hammond organ and Rhodes piano.

In the end it all ties back to the group’s goals, which essentially involve making really good rock songs, and you don’t need a crazy origin story to do that.

Oct
31
Sat
Musicians Corner : Fall Season Closer & Halloween Celebration : The Lonely Biscuits, The Whistles & The Bells, Moonsville Collective, Justin Klump @ Centennial Park
Oct 31 all-day

Our Fall 2015 Season takes place September 5 to October 31.

Musicians Corner, a program of The Conservancy for the Parthenon and Centennial Park, presents free weekly lawn parties in Nashville’s Centennial Park on Saturday afternoons in May, June, September and October.

Follow us on Twitter: @muscornernash
Follow us on Instagram: /MusCornerNash
Learn more and get performance schedules at www.musicianscornernashville.com

Musicians Corner is a program of The Conservancy for the Parthenon and Centennial Park, a 5019c)(3) nonprofit organization.

Lightning 100’s Paranormal Rocktivity w/ Here Come the Mummies @ Marathon Music Works
Oct 31 @ 7:00 PM – 11:45 PM

Lightning 100’s Paranormal Rocktivity w/ Here Come the Mummies

SAT, OCTOBER 31, 2015

DOORS: 8:00 PM / SHOW: 9:00 PM

MARATHON MUSIC WORKS

NASHVILLE, TN

$30.00 – $35.00

THIS EVENT IS 18 AND OVER

ABSOLUTELY NO REFUNDS – NO EXCEPTIONS. LINEUPS AND TIMES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE.
GOV’T ISSUED ID REQUIRED. NO RE-ENTRY.

Here Come The Mummies

Here Come The Mummies

It’s been a long and dusty road since 1922 when, at a dig in the desert south of Tunis, Professor
Nigel Quentin Fontanelle Dumblucke IV (1895-) unearthed the ruins of an ancient discotheque
to find a dozen undead Egyptian mummies inexplicably throwing down what he dubbed,
“Terrifying Funk From Beyond the Grave.”
From these hovering souls, who called themselves Here Come The Mummies, Professor
Dumblucke learned of the powerful curse that doomed them to wander the earth, seeking the
ultimate riff, the one that may allow their spirits to rest after eons of, as they put it, “banging out
solid fly grooves, y’all.” But their story was murky at best…
What is clear is that these saucy specters resurfaced around the turn of the Millennium. Without
so much as a hot bath, HCTM would open for P-Funk and Al Green, rock Super Bowl Village
2012, become regulars on The Bob and Tom Show and at massive festivals like Summerfest
and Musikfest, and make themselves the darlings of sell-out crowds over wide swaths of North
America. Maybe that’s why the ladies (and some dudes) can’t stop losing their minds over
these mayhem-inducing mavens of mirth.
2013 saw HCTM pool what remained of their dusty hearts, addled brains, and withered
appendages to make Cryptic, their acclaimed sixth studio album.
2014 has been HCTM’s most prolific year to date! Three of five scheduled 5-song EPs have
been released so far: A La Mode, Pull it Off, and Shocker. An adapted version of
Rejuvannihilation, a new full-length concert film, is airing across the US on Public Television’s
Front and Center.
Some say they were cursed after deflowering a great Pharaoh’s daughter. Others claim they are
reincarnated Grammy-Winning studio musicians. Regardless, HCTM’s mysterious personas,
cunning song-craft, and unrelenting live show will bend your brain, and melt your face. Get
ready, Here Come The Mummies.
“Here Come The Mummies are one bad-ass band, a hybrid of Idris Muhammad, George
Clinton, Ohio Players, and Earth, Wind & Fire.” -Blurt Magazine
“A band unlike any other.” -examiner.com
“That’s the most fun I’ve had in 20 years.” -Bob Kevoian, The Bob & Tom Show
“Cock wobbling brilliant.” -Joe Elliott of Def Leppard
Nov
15
Sun
Nashville Sunday Night Presents: The SteelDrivers @ 3rd and Lindsley
Nov 15 @ 8:00 PM – 10:00 PM

Event Image

Right there, at two minutes and ten seconds into the first song, “Long Way Down.” The part where Gary Nichols sings, “Girl, we both know where your soul is bound.” Only he bleeds it as much as he sings it. He sounds murderous, maniacal. Her soul is bound for nothing skyward, for nothing heavenly. And he’s fine with that.

Richard Bailey’s banjo plays funky, little Kentucky-goes-to-Memphis rolls. Tammy Rogers’ fiddle soars. Brent Truitt’s mandolin chops time, and Mike Fleming’s bass pounds the downbeat. And all that is righteous and right-on. Elevated, even. But Nichols—he lets loose something the opposite of righteousness. It’s a howl, full of hurt and anger and life. Starts on the highest E note that 99.9% of male singers can hit, then ascends into a sweet falsetto, and then opens up like the gates of Hell, into a reeling screech.

Nichols is from Muscle Shoals. He grew up as a guitar slinger and a soul shouter, which should not be any help in fronting one of bluegrass music’s most engaging outfits. But part of the reason the SteelDrivers are such an engaging band is the seemingly incongruous blend of soul and slink, blues and country, mountain coal and red dirt.

“I think that’s what moves people when they come to see us: the realness and rawness and edge,” says Rogers, who formed the SteelDrivers in 2005 with Bailey, Fleming, multi-instrumentalist Mike Henderson, and soulful singer (and now-acclaimed contemporary country artist) Chris Stapleton. That version of the SteelDrivers received three GRAMMY® nominations and won an audience that was surprised and initially saddened by the 2010 and 2011 departures of Stapleton and Henderson. But the entries of Nichols and virtuoso mandolin talent Truitt have created a SteelDrivers band that carries the gutbucket ethic of the original combo, but pleases in different ways.

Truitt’s fluid mandolin added another virtuoso element to a group that is undergirded by Fleming’s upright bass and baritone harmonies. In the studio, the band kept pushing the tempo, perhaps to assuage the sadness and, perhaps, because it’s sometimes easier for master musicians to play with reckless abandon than with somber certainty.

Nichols and Isbell played together as teens when Nichols fronted Gulliver, a band that included bass man Jimbo Hart and drummer Ryan Tillery. When Nichols scored a major label deal with Mercury Records in 2006, he hit the road with Hart and Tillery. When Nichols exited Mercury, Hart and Tillery joined Isbell’s 400 Unit band.

Nichols and the SteelDrivers speak in their own accent, one that charms and sears and beguiles. This is a band like no other, by inclination but not by calculation. Nichols, Rogers, Bailey, Fleming, Truitt … Those of us who have listened all know where their souls are bound. Bound to triumph. Bound to rise. Bound to matter. Bound to resound. Bound to impact. Bound to roar and shimmy, to howl and heal. A damn good band, this one. If you don’t believe it, start around two minutes and ten seconds into “Long Way Down.” That’s the stuff, right there.

Dec
6
Sun
Nashville Sunday Night Presents: The Wood Brothers @ 3rd and Lindsley
Dec 6 @ 8:00 PM – 10:00 PM

http://i.ticketweb.com//i/00/05/87/27/39_Edp.jpg

The cover of The Wood Brothers’ gorgeous new album, ‘Paradise,’ is adorned with an illustration of a mule staring at a carrot dangling just inches in front of its mouth. The carrot, though, is hanging from a stick affixed to the mule’s own head.

“In some ways, he’s already got it,” explains guitarist Oliver Wood. “And in some ways, he’ll never have it.”

That paradox is at the core of ‘Paradise,’ an album about longing and desire and the ways in which the pursuit of fulfillment can keep it perpetually out of our reach. It’s a beautiful collection, the band’s most sophisticated work to date and also their most rocking, with bassist Chris Wood playing electric on tracks for the first time. Recorded at Dan Auerbach’s Easy Eye studio in Nashville, ‘Paradise’ captures the latest chapter in the ongoing evolution of a band—and a family—navigating the joy and challenges of a life in music.

Dubbed “masters of soulful folk” by Paste, The Wood Brothers released their debut studio album, ‘Ways Not To Lose,’ on Blue Note in 2006. You’d be forgiven at the time for expecting it to be something of a side project. Chris Wood already had legions of devoted fans for his incomparable work as one-third of Medeski Martin & Wood, while his brother Oliver toured with Tinsley Ellis before releasing a half-dozen albums with his band King Johnson. Almost a decade later and with drummer Jano Rix added as a permanent third member, it’s become quite clear that The Wood Brothers is indeed the main act.

‘Paradise’ follows the band’s acclaimed 2013 release ‘The Muse,’ which was recorded almost entirely live around a tree of microphones in Zac Brown’s Southern Ground studio. Hailed previously by the New York Times for their “gripping” vocals and by the LA Times for their “taught musicianship,” the brothers found the live setting to be a remarkable showcase for their live chemistry and charismatic magnetism. But when it came time to record ‘Paradise,’ their fifth studio album, the band knew the music called for a different approach.

“For this album, we wanted to have a more up-close and dry sound,” explains Chris. “I worked on another record at Easy Eye and I just loved the room. Dan’s studio is cool because it’s not old, but it feels that way when you walk into it. It reminds me of Sun Studios. It just has that feeling of a small room with natural compression, and I think you hear that in the sounds on the record.”

The decision to record in Nashville was no coincidence either, as this marks the first album written with the entire band living in Music City.

Dec
7
Mon
Lightning 100 Presents Ryan Bingham with James Revival @ Exit/In
Dec 7 @ 8:00 PM

Lightning 100 Presents:

Ryan Bingham

Jamestown Revival

MON, DECEMBER 7, 2015

DOORS: 8:00 PM / SHOW: 9:00 PM

EXIT/IN

NASHVILLE, TN

$25.00 – $28.00

ON SALE
FRI 8/21
10:00 AM CDT

THIS EVENT IS 18 AND OVER

Absolutely no refunds – no exceptions. Lineups and times are subject to change.
Gov’t issued ID required. No re-entry.

Ryan Bingham

Ryan Bingham

Grammy and Oscar- winning singer/songwriter Ryan Bingham was born in New Mexico but raised all across the Southwestern United States. He set out on his own, at a young age, shuffling from town to town and performing gigs at local no-frills bars. It’s this spirit of having done plenty of living early on, that has informed the singer- songwriters world-weary and jagged, weather-beaten vocals.

At only 34 years of age, Bingham has five studio albums under his belt (‘Mescalito’, ‘Roadhouse Sun’, ‘Junky Star’, ‘Tomorrowland’ & ‘Fear And Saturday Night’) the two most recent of which were released under his own label Axster Bingham Records.

For his 2015 release ‘Fear and Saturday Night’, Bingham needed some peace and quiet, free of the burdens that had saddled him during the writing and recording of his recent albums. Bingham lost both his parents to alcoholism, and parted ways with his former band “The Dead Horses.” He relocated to an old airstream trailer tucked away in the mountains of California, camping out for several weeks and embracing the solitude to dig down deep and craft his most powerful album yet. The album was recorded mostly live, with a brand new backing band and under the guidance of producer/engineer Jim Scott near Bingham’s home in Los Angeles, CA.

In 2015 Bingham will be touring the US and Europe in support of his new album Fear And Saturday Night, in which Bingham faces down his past with a poetic grace throughout. It’s the hard-learned lessons, through both good times and bad, which helped make Bingham the man he is today. Fear and Saturday Night is the most authentic, personal, and deeply moving portrait of that man we’ve heard yet.

Jamestown Revival

Jamestown Revival

Jamestown Revival is an idea formed by Jonathan Clay & Zach Chance. For lack of a better word, it could be called a “duo”, but that just doesn’t quite capture the essence of their delivery. This band is two-man rock & roll, and the closest possible categorization one could label it with would sound something like “indie-rock with a southern slant”. Drawing on influences ranging from The Band, to Simon and Garfunkle, Jamestown Revival’s sound is harmony driven and rooted in southern soul. The two are childhood friends, and the chemistry is evident when seeing them perform. Formed in 2011, the band has already been featured on the Carson Daly Show, as well as Rolling Stone Magazine. With a self-produced EP that reached #9 on the iTunes charts, the duo has criss-crossed the country, playing everywhere from dive bars to amphitheaters.
Dec
13
Sun
Lightning 100 Presents City and Colour with Bahamas @ War Memorial Auditorium
Dec 13 @ 8:00 PM – 11:00 PM

City and Colour with Bahamas will be at War Memorial Auditorium – December 13, 2015 at 8:00 p.m.

War Memorial Auditorium and AEG Live / The Messina Group are pleased to announce that City and Colour will bring his tug-at-the-gut ballads, new southern-swept soul, and punk rock roots to Nashville on December 13 with special guest Bahamas.

In support of his fifth release, If I Should Go Before You, out October 9, City & Colour says “Anybody who has seen us play will understand that this is the best representation of what we do live that we have ever recorded.”  For Dallas Green’s forthcoming album (released as City and Colour), he returned to Blackbird Studios in Nashville, which has become a special refuge – “In Toronto, I think of what I have to do,” he says.  “In Nashville, I think of everything I have done.”

*All ticket prices increase by $5 day of show.

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