Nashville Sunday Night

Like Nashville Sunday Night on Facebook and Twitter!

Like Nashville Sunday Night on Facebook and Twitter!

Lightning 100 brings you our critically acclaimed weekly concert series featuring national, regional and local artists. The show broadcasts live from 3rd & Lindsley on Sundays from 8-10 PM.

Lightning 100 is proud to say that Nashville Sunday Night is our longest running show and broadcast!   Nashville Sunday Night is sponsored by New Amsterdam Vodka and Goose Island Beer.

May
31
Sun
Nashville Sunday Night Presents: Future Thieves with Kink Ador @ 3rd and Lindsley
May 31 @ 8:00 PM – 10:00 PM

Future ThievesWith the release of their debut EP, Future Thieves, comprised of Elliot Collett (vocals and rhythm guitar), Gianni Gibson (drums), Nick Goss (bass), and Austin McCool (lead guitar), are one of Nashville’s most exciting emerging acts.

The American rock band, formed in the fall of 2013, can trace their beginnings to Collett’s previous endeavors playing an Americana/blues style focused around his singer/songwriter mentality. After moving to Nashville, Collett teamed up with McCool and Goss to form a sound influenced by classic and big indie rock. Gibson then joined the four and meshed immediately as the group began rehearsing and writing.Collett, a coal miner’s son from the hills of Kentucky, got his start running live sound for numerous artists and traveling to play shows in and around Nashville.

Before moving to Tennessee, Elliot graduated with an audio engineering degree in Lexington, KY. McCool and Goss both hail from southern Indiana, dating back to the 6th grade together and continuing through college at Purdue University. Each grew up playing the guitar after stealing tablature books and bouncing ideas off of friends down the street. After graduating college the two moved to Nashville to pursue music. For Gianni, growing up in Los Angeles offered the perfect blend of culture and music for Gibson to focus on his skills as a percussionist. Having both parents involved in the music industry, he realized his passion for music at a very young age.

The band’s instrumentation is written collectively, while Collett spreads his melodies and storytelling across the tracks. Future Thieves brings a big indie rock/americana sound with a powerful rhythm section, fresh guitar melodies, and singer/songwriter style vocals. Future Thieves released their debut EP in 2014, and are currently recording the follow-up full-length. All tracks are played, engineered, and produced by Future Thieves in their home studio Nashville Music House in Nashville, TN.

Jun
7
Sun
Nashville Sunday Night Presents: The Lonesome Trio featuring Ed Helms, Ian Riggs, and Jacob Tilove @ 3rd and Lindsley
Jun 7 @ 8:00 PM – 10:00 PM

Lonesome Trio 99_EdpTwenty-two years ago, in the rolling plains of northern Ohio, a strange and fortuitous gathering occurred. Ed Helms, Ian Riggs, and Jacob Tilove, then students at Oberlin College, were drawn together by a mutual love of fine whiskey and bluegrass. In short order, music was happening. With Riggs on bass, Helms on guitar, Tilove on mandolin and all three melodically shouting, a distinctive musical voice took shape. Soon other friends joined up on all manner of banjos and fiddles and a loose-knit ensemble called Weedkiller was born. They played back porches, front yards, and basement keg parties all over Oberlin for a few great years, but when college ended, so did Weedkiller. As the universe would have it, Ed, Jake, and Ian all landed in New York City to pursue their individual hare-brained passions of comedy, architectural history, and jazz bass studies respectively. City life was exciting and chaotic, but their friendship and musical bond endured, and their regular, informal jam sessions kept everyone’s feet on the ground. Over time those informal sessions became songwriting sessions and even a casual recording session or two. Soon invitations rolled in to play at a friend’s party or a cousin’s wedding and before they knew it, The Lonesome Trio was a fixture on the NYC bluegrass scene, playing regular shows at the Parkside Lounge, Rockwood Music Hall, and other depraved haunts of the old-time crowd. Despite active careers in various fields, The Lonesome Trio soldiered on, a constant in the topsy-turvy lives of its dedicated members. The particular sound and voice of The Lonesome Trio might be described as rootsy, bluegrass-ish, Americana, or even a little bit cowboy. But a more accurate description might be the peculiar mind meld of three old friends who’ve been through 22 years of life, love, loss, and laughter together, working it all out through raw and honest acoustic music.

Nashville Sunday Night Presents: The Lonesome Trio featuring Ed Helms, Ian Riggs, & Jacob Tilove with Haas Kowert Tice @ 3rd and Lindsley
Jun 7 @ 8:00 PM – 10:00 PM

Lonesome Trio NSN

Twenty-two years ago, in the rolling plains of northern Ohio, a strange and fortuitous gathering occurred. Ed Helms, Ian Riggs, and Jacob Tilove, then students at Oberlin College, were drawn together by a mutual love of fine whiskey and bluegrass. In short order, music was happening. With Riggs on bass, Helms on guitar, Tilove on mandolin and all three melodically shouting, a distinctive musical voice took shape. Soon other friends joined up on all manner of banjos and fiddles and a loose-knit ensemble called Weedkiller was born. They played back porches, front yards, and basement keg parties all over Oberlin for a few great years, but when college ended, so did Weedkiller. As the universe would have it, Ed, Jake, and Ian all landed in New York City to pursue their individual hare-brained passions of comedy, architectural history, and jazz bass studies respectively. City life was exciting and chaotic, but their friendship and musical bond endured, and their regular, informal jam sessions kept everyone’s feet on the ground. Over time those informal sessions became songwriting sessions and even a casual recording session or two. Soon invitations rolled in to play at a friend’s party or a cousin’s wedding and before they knew it, The Lonesome Trio was a fixture on the NYC bluegrass scene, playing regular shows at the Parkside Lounge, Rockwood Music Hall, and other depraved haunts of the old-time crowd. Despite active careers in various fields, The Lonesome Trio soldiered on, a constant in the topsy-turvy lives of its dedicated members. The particular sound and voice of The Lonesome Trio might be described as rootsy, bluegrass-ish, Americana, or even a little bit cowboy. But a more accurate description might be the peculiar mind meld of three old friends who’ve been through 22 years of life, love, loss, and laughter together, working it all out through raw and honest acoustic music.

Jun
14
Sun
Nashville Sunday Night Presents: Elle King @ 3rd and Lindsley
Jun 14 @ 8:00 PM – 10:00 PM

Elle King NSNFrank and fearless, tender and rowdy, Elle King’s debut album, LOVE STUFF marks the true arrival of the young singer/songwriter/guitarist/banjoist as a pop force to be reckoned with. She recorded these twelve songs with such remarkable producers as Jeff Bhasker (Fun., Kanye West), Eg White (Adele, Sam Smith), and Jacknife Lee (R.E.M., U2), and guest musicians including Mark Ronson and Patrick Carney of the Black Keys. The album is the follow-up to 2012’s acclaimed The Elle King EP. Following the EP’s release, King toured extensively with the likes of Ed Sheeran, Train, and Of Monsters and Men, pushing back her work on new music.

Periodic sessions took her around the world, from London to Malibu, Memphis to New York City. “I have so many influences, I wake up in different moods and want to play different music, and in some wacky way, we tied it all in,” says King. “We found the people that got me, that believed in me and wanted to be a part of it—after we did one song together, they wanted to do another.”

The results, as heard on LOVE STUFF, display King’s grounding in rock, blues, country, and pop styles, and a sweeping emotional road map—the stomp of “Where the Devil Don’t Go,” the sexy sweetness of “Make You Smile,” the swagger of “America’s Sweetheart.” She notes “Sweetheart” as a breakthrough, saying that producer/co-writer Martin Johnson (who she calls “an insane pop genius”) pushed her harder than any other collaborator.

Elle moved to New York City at age 10; after getting kicked out of school, she headed to California, then returned to New York, and then to Philadelphia for art college. In the midst of her far-flung and hell-raising travels, King started playing guitar at age 13 (“a friend of my stepdad’s taught me, and I learned stuff by, like, the Yeah Yeah Yeahs and Otis Redding”) and then later picked up a banjo, inspired by the Hank Williams and Earl Scruggs records her family listened to.

It was during her time in Philadelphia that her music took a different turn, and her songwriting got more serious. “I was living on my own, getting into way too much trouble, and really getting my heart broken for the first time,” she says. “I’ve never been shy, but that’s when I started singing in parks and busking.”

The songs that started emerging got her noticed and led to the making of The Elle King EP. But even after relocating to Brooklyn and pursuing a music career in earnest, King was no more able to settle down. “I haven’t been able to sit still since I could walk,” she says. “I followed a country singer to Nashville, got my heart broken again but decided to stay there and try to figure it out. I took a year to really think, and then left and I haven’t stopped—I drove 30 thousand miles in the first six weeks. But if you can’t handle that, you’re not gonna make it. I want to put my feet in every country, I just want to go out and play. I’m a gypsy.” “I have such a sense of pride about this album,” she continues. “I worked my ass off and kept trying my hardest. I feel unbelievably lucky. I still can’t believe I’m getting away with it.”

Jun
21
Sun
Nashville Sunday Night Presents: Sister Sparrow and The Dirty Birds with Anthony D’Amato @ 3rd and Lindsley
Jun 21 @ 8:00 PM – 10:00 PM

The Catskill Mountains hid rock ‘n’ roll’s best kept secret for almost 18 years.

Then in 2008, singer and songwriter Arleigh Kincheloe said goodbye to her hometown hideaway and moved to New York City to start Sister Sparrow & The Dirty Birds. In the years since, the group has performed more than 600 shows, released two full­length albums and an EP produced by Randy Jackson (American Idol), and enchanted tastemakers ranging from The Wall Street Journal and LA Times to Glamour, USA Today, and The New Yorker. They have shared the stage with such heavyweights as Gov’t Mule, Dr. John, Trombone Shorty, The Avett Brothers, Counting Crows, and Galactic, and have turned audiences into believers through appearances on the festival circuit at Bonnaroo, Firefly, Hardly Strictly Bluegrass, Voodoo Music Experience and many more.

On May 19th, the band will unleash their most rambunctious, raucous, and righteous recording to date in the form of The Weather Below, which features the band’s roster of her brother, Jackson Kincheloe (harmonica), Sasha Brown (guitar), Josh Myers (bass), Phil Rodriguez (trumpet), and Brian Graham (saxophones), and Dan Boyden (drums).

So, what is it about this “hard soul collective,” as Arleigh so eloquently puts it, that has engendered such passion from both the press and the people?  “It’s loud, fun, and it’s supposed to make you feel good,” she declares. “That’s the goal.”

Sister Sparrow & The Dirty Birds accomplish that goal tenfold with a saucy sonic brew of rock, blues, gospel, and soul. In order to perfect that signature amalgam, the band retreated to the iconic Bear Creek Studio (James Brown, Eric Clapton), just outside Seattle, WA. Locked in the studio for three weeks, they worked closely with producer Ryan Hadlock (The Lumineers, Vance Joy) and cooked up ten irresistible anthems.

“In the past, we did every other record while we were still on the road,” says Arleigh. “This time, we blocked out time to immerse ourselves in the recording process. We lived at the studio and worked for 15 hours a day. Ryan was everything I’d hoped for. He saw my vision and added his own flavor. Plus, the studio is so beautiful. We were in a barn in the woods, which was very reminiscent of the Catskill Mountains for me. I felt right at home.”

The group takes flight on the first single “Mama Knows.” Bolstered by boisterous horns and bluesy grit, the track serves as a soulfully sweet ode to moms everywhere. “The idea for the chorus popped into my head when I was hanging out with my sister,” Arleigh recalls. “We were thinking about our mom. She’s a huge influence on why I sing. She was my role model. She sang too, and I’d attend her gigs as a little kid. She was so powerful and beautiful—just a queen in my eyes. On the flip side, she raised us to be really humble. I wanted to do something to show my appreciation to her and mothers like her everywhere.”

Ultimately, Sister Sparrow & The Dirty Birds stand poised to shake up rock ‘n’ roll all around the world. “This all stems back to why I loved performing and singing to begin with,” Arleigh leaves off. “I want to make crowds happy and see them smile and dance. Singing brings me so much joy. I hope our music does the same for everyone.”

Aug
2
Sun
Nashville Sunday Night Presents: Jackie Greene @ 3rd and Lindsley
Aug 2 @ 8:00 PM – 10:00 PM

We live in such a fast-paced, hectic environment, I wanted to make a record that would invite people to step back and take their time to listen,” Jackie Greene says of Back to Birth, his first album in five years. “I wanted to make a record that would reward people who are willing to sit down and give it a couple of serious listens.”

Back to Birth – Greene’s seventh album and his Yep Roc Records debut – is more than worthy of some serious attention. The 11-song set showcases the multitalented artist’s uncanny knack for synthesizing his deep affinity for American roots styles into timeless, personally-charged music. Armed with a persuasive voice, a vivid songwriting skill and an instinctive mastery of several instruments, Greene has carved out a unique musical niche, and the album marks another creative landmark in his already compelling body of work.

Produced by Los Lobos member and frequent Greene collaborator Steve Berlin, Back to Birth underlines Greene’s remarkable evolution as a performer and writer. With such new compositions as “Silver Lining,” “Trust Somebody,” “Now I Can See For Miles,” and the stirring title track, the artist’s distinctive melodic sensibility is matched with thoughtful, introspective lyrics that confront some profound philosophical issues with plainspoken eloquence.

Although Back to Birth is Greene’s first new solo release in five years, he’s hardly been idle. In fact, he’s spent much of the past few years engaging in a series of collaborative musical adventures that have teamed him with several notable veterans.

In 2013, Greene joined the reunited Black Crowes as lead guitarist on their worldwide tour, and the following year released the self-titled debut album of supergroup Trigger Hippy, which Greene is a member of along with Joan Osborne and Crowes drummer Steve Gorman. Greene continues to be a frequent member of Grateful Dead bassist Phil Lesh’s touring ensemble Phil Lesh & Friends, for which he has contributed lead guitar and vocals since 2007. Greene also toured as part of WRG, an acoustic trio with the Grateful Dead’s Bob Weir and Black Crowes frontman Chris Robinson, and he performed with Levon Helm as part of Helm’s fabled Midnight Ramble shows.

Although he’s already racked up a multitude of impressive musical achievements, Greene isn’t one to look back. Instead, he continues to look to the future – and looks forward to getting back on the road to bring Back to Birth’s soulful songcraft to the loyal, wildly diverse fan base that he’s built through talent, vision and hard work.

“I still plan on making a lot of different kinds of records in the future, but I can’t tell you what they’re going to sound like, because I really have no idea,” he asserts. “All I can do is write songs and make music as honestly as I can. That’s what I believe people appreciate about what I do. They trust me to be honest with them, and I’d never want to abuse that trust.”

0 Comments