Langhorne Slim & The Law – The Way We Move

There is nothing like the challenges and camaraderie of the road to inspire a songwriter who thrives upon the emotional energy and exhilaration only travel can deliver. Some singers are devoted to the pursuit of perpetual motion, and Langhorne Slim releases his wild soul in ways that come out of the discipline of live performance.

The 13 songs that compose Langhorne Slim & The Law’s new The Way We Move are road-tested, rollicking and very rock ‘n’ rolling tunes that the songwriter perfected with his loyal band, and come out of the kind of good times and bad experiences that songwriters of Langhorne’s lofty stature can turn into life-affirming rock ‘n’ roll. You could also call what Langhorne Slim does folk music, but then there’s his sly, charming and open-hearted feel for pop music—those summertime melodies that nudge you into a grin even when the song is about something bad.

For Langhorne Slim—Pennsylvania-born self-taught guitarist who moves to Brooklyn at 18, begins feeling out his place in a burgeoning punk-folk scene, wends his way to the West Coast, and finds himself celebrated from Newport to Portland as one of today’s most original singers and songwriters—The Way We Move represents the sound of a band devoted to living in the moment. Riding the success of his 2009 full-length Be Set Free, Langhorne went through some changes over the last three years—he lost his beloved grandfather, who is the subject of the new record’s moving “Song for Sid,” and moved on from a relationship that had lasted five years.

And there was the physical moving—the literal side of the record’s title. Pulling up stakes from his home of two years, Portland, Ore., Langhorne also has been touring non-stop with The Law. As he says, “I’m in a bit of a transitional period—currently, the road will be home. That’s just kind of my spirit, to be slightly restless.” Perfecting their rangy sound out on the endless grey ribbon, Langhorne and The Law— bassist Jeff Ratner, drummer Malachi DeLorenzo and banjo player and keyboardist David Moore—went down to rural Texas in the summer of 2011 to work on new material. With some 30 tunes to consider, the quartet soaked up the Lone Star sunshine and developed arrangements and approaches for Langhorne’s latest batch of songs.

Jeff Ratner had joined the group at the time of Be Set Free, and brought on multi-instrumentalist David Moore not long after. Moore and Ratner go way back, having moved to New York around the same time, and they’ve played together in what Jeff estimates are 15 bands. Langhorne’s association with Malachi is equally deep. As the group played together through tours with the Drive-By Truckers and the Avett Brothers, and made appearances at the Newport Folk Festival and Bonnaroo, their bond became ever stronger, their music more confident. This is what you hear on The Way We Move—forward motion meeting deep cohesion, all in the service of Langhorne’s amazing songs and compelling vocals.

Read more

0 Comments

Indie Underground on 6/9/12

Metric – Youth Without Youth (Synthetica, Mom+Pop)
Crocodiles – Sunday (Psychic Conversation #9) (Endless Flowers, Frenchkiss)
Kelly Hogan – We Can’t Have Nice Things (I Like To Keep Myself In Pain, Anti-)
Bobby Womack – Please Forgive My Heart (The Bravest Man In The Universe, XL)
Regina Spektor – Small Town Moon (What We Saw From The Cheap Seats, Sire)
The Walkmen – Heaven (Heaven, Fat Possum)
Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros – Dear Believer (Here, Community/Vagrant)
JBM – Forests (Stray Ashes, Western Vinyl)
Julia Stone – Bloodbuzz Ohio (By The Horns, Nettwerk)
Exitmusic – The Night (Passage, Dead Oceans)
The Hives – Go Right Ahead (Lex Hives, No Fun)
PUJOL – Black Rabbit (United States Of Being, Saddle Creek)
Langhorne Slim – The Way We Move (The Way We Move, Ramseur Records)

0 Comments

« Older Entries